SkyView Surveys

Frequency vs Data Pixel Resolution plot of all SkyView Surveys

Plot of all surveys by resolution/frequency resolution
Click image to add survey names.

The diversity of SkyView surveys is shown here. Data ranges over about 18 orders of magnitude in energy and about 5 orders of magnitude in resolution. See our SkyView Blog post for more information.


Introduction

This document gives a short overview of each of the surveys included in SkyView. The descriptions include textual description which describe special properties of these surveys and a short table giving basic information for the survey.

The table includes:


Radio surveys
GTEE 0035 MHz Radio Survey
GMRT 150 MHz All-sky Radio Survey
Bonn 1420 MHz Survey
Effelsberg-Bonn HI Survey
HI All-Sky Continuum Survey
4850 MHz Survey/GB6
CO Galactic Plane Survey
FIRST
Dickey and Lockman HI map
NVSS
Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey
VLA Low-frequency Sky Survey
Westerbork Northern Sky Survey
GOODS North Observations with the VLA

Millimeter surveys
Planck 030 GHz Survey
Planck 044 GHz Survey
Planck 070 GHz Survey
Planck 100 GHz Survey
Planck 143 GHz Survey
Planck 217 GHz Survey
Planck 353 GHz Survey
Planck 545 GHz Survey
Planck 857 GHz Survey
LABOCA Extended Chandra Deep Field South Submillimetre Survey

Infrared surveys
Two Micron All Sky Survey (H-Band)
Two Micron All Sky Survey (J-Band)
Two Micron All Sky Survey (K-Band)
WISE 3.4 All-Sky Release Survey
WISE 4.6 All-Sky Release Survey
WISE 12 Micron All-Sky Survey
WISE 22 Micron All-Sky Survey
AKARI WIDE-S
AKARI N160
Cosmic Background Explorer DIRBE Annual Average Map
Cosmic Background Explorer DIRBE Zodi-Subtracted Mission Average
IRAS Sky Survey Atlas: 100 micron
IRAS Sky Survey Atlas: 12 micron
IRAS Sky Survey Atlas: 25 micron
IRAS Sky Survey Atlas: 60 micron
Improved Reprocessing of the IRAS Survey: 100
Improved Reprocessing of the IRAS Survey: 12
Improved Reprocessing of the IRAS Survey: 25
Improved Reprocessing of the IRAS Survey: 60
Schlegel, Finkbeiner and Davis 100 micron survey
Schlegel, Finkbeiner and Davis Dust Survey
UKIRT Infrared Deep Survey H-band
UKIRT Infrared Deep Survey J-band
UKIRT Infrared Deep Survey K-band
UKIRT Infrared Deep Survey Y-band
WMAP Five Year Galaxy Removed
WMAP Five Year Ka-Band
WMAP Five Year K-Band
WMAP Five Year Q-Band
WMAP Five Year V-Band
WMAP Five Year W-band

Optical surveys
Original Digitized Sky Survey
First Digitized Sky Survey: Blue Plates
First Digitized Sky Survey: Red Plates
2nd Digitized Sky Survey (Blue)
2nd Digitized Sky Survey (Infrared)
2nd Digitized Sky Survey (Red)
Mellinger All Sky Mosaic: Blue
Mellinger All Sky Mosaic: Green
Mellinger All Sky Mosaic: Red
H-alpha Full Sky Map
Near-Earth Asteriod Tracking System Archive
Sloan Digitized Sky Survey G-band
Sloan Digitzed Sky Survey I-band
Sloan Digitzed Sky Survey R-band
Sloan Digitzed Sky Survey U-band
Sloan Digitzed Sky Survey Z-band
The Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas: Continuum
The Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas: Continuum-Corrected
The Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas: H-alpha
The Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas: Smoothed
GOODS HST ACS V Filter
GOODS HST ACS I Filter
GOODS HST ACS B Filter
GOODS HST ACS Z Filter

Ultraviolet surveys
Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer: 83 A
Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer: 171 A
Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer: 405 A
Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer: 555 A
Galaxy Explorer All Sky Survey: Far UV
Galaxy Explorer All Sky Survey: Near UV
ROSAT Wide Field Camera: F1
ROSAT Wide Field Camera: F2

X-ray surveys
Swift BAT All-Sky Survey: Flux and Significance
GRANAT/SIGMA Flux
GRANAT/SIGMA
HEAO 1A
ROSAT High Resolution Image Pointed Observations Mosaic: Intensity
INTEGRAL/Spectral Imager Galactic Center Survey
PSPC summed pointed observations, 1 degree cutoff, intensity
PSPC summed pointed observations, 2 degree cutoff, counts
PSPC summed pointed observations, 2 degree cutoff, exposure
PSPC summed pointed observations, 2 degree cutoff, intensity
ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey Broad Band
ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey Hard Band
ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey Soft Band
ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Background Survey: Bands 1
ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Background Survey: Bands 2
ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Background Survey: Bands 3
ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Background Survey: Bands 4
ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Background Survey: Bands 5
ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Background Survey: Bands 6
ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Background Survey: Bands 7
ROSAT All-Sky Broad Band Intensity
ROSAT All-Sky Hard Band Intensity
ROSAT All-Sky Broad Band Intensity
RXTE Allsky 3-20keV Significance
RXTE Allsky 3-8keV Significance
RXTE Allsky 8-20keV Significance
Nine Year INTEGRAL IBIS 17-35 keV Galactic Plane Survey: Flux
Nine Year INTEGRAL IBIS 17-60 keV Galactic Plane Survey: Flux
Nine Year INTEGRAL IBIS 35-80 keV Galactic Plane Survey: Flux
GOODS ACIS: Hard band (2-8 keV)
GOODS ACIS: Soft band (0.5-2 keV)
GOODS ACIS: Full band (0.5-8 keV)

Gamma ray surveys
CGRO Compton Telescope: 3 channel data
Energetic Gamma-Ray Event Telescope: 10 channel data
Energetic Gamma-Ray Event Telescope: Hard
Energetic Gamma-Ray Event Telescope: Soft
Fermi Map: Band 1
Fermi Map: Band 2
Fermi Map: Band 3
Fermi Map: Band 4
Fermi Map: Band 5

Radio surveys

Bonn 1420 MHz Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey: 1420MHz, 1420MHz (Bonn)

Description
This survey was taken with the Bonn Stockert 25m telescope. It was distributed on the NRAO Images from the Radio Sky CD-ROM. This image was delivered as a four map mosaic but was combined into a single map before being included in SkyView.

Provenance Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, generated by P. Reich and W. Reich
Copyright Max-Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie (permission for educational and private non-commercial use granted without further request)
Regime Radio
NSurvey 1
Frequency 1420 MHz
Bandpass 1418.8-1421.2 MHz
Coverage Declination > -16
PixelScale 0.25 deg/pixel
PixelUnits millikelvins
Resolution 34'
CoordinateSystem Equatorial
Equinox 1950
Projection Rectangular (CAR)
Epoch 1972-09 to 1973-05, 1973-08 to 1974-04
Reference Reich, 1982, A&AS48, 219. Reich and Reich, 1986, A&AS63, 205 (ADS)

HI All-Sky Continuum Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey: 408MHz,0408MHz

Description
This survey is a mosaic of data taken at Jodrell Bank, Effelsberg and Parkes telescopes. The data was distributed in the NRAO Images from the Radio Sky CD ROM.

Provenance Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, generated by Glyn Haslam
Copyright Max-Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie (permission for educational and private non-commercial use granted without further request)
Regime Radio
NSurvey 1
Frequency 408 MHz
Bandpass 406.25-409.75 MHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.3515 degrees/pixel
PixelUnits Kelvins
Resolution 0.85 degrees
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection Rectangular (CAR)
Epoch Jodrell Bank: 1965-11 to 1966-02 and 1978-08 to 1979-09
MPI: 1971-07 to 1972-02
PKS: 1973-12 to 1975-05
Reference Haslam et al., 1982,A&AS47, 1 (ADS).

4850 MHz Survey - GB6/PMN

Short name[s] used to specify survey: 4850MHz,GB6/PMN,PMN,GB6,GB6 (4850MHz)

Description
The 4850MHz data is a combination of data from three different surveys: Parkes-MIT-NRAO (PMN) Southern (-88° to -37° declination) and tropical surveys (-29° to -9° declination, and (86+87) Green Bank survey (0° to +75° declination). The data contains gaps between -27° to -39°, -9° to 0°, and +77° to +90° declination. The 4850MHz survey data were obtained by tape from J.J. Condon and are comprised of 576 images and are used by permission. Full information pertaining to these surveys are found in the references.

Provenance NRAO, generated by J.J. Condon, J.J. Broderick and G.A. Seielstad, Douglas, K., and Gregory, P.C.
Copyright Used by permission of J.J. Condon
Regime Radio
NSurvey 2
Frequency 4850 MHz continuum
Bandpass 4550 - 5150 MHz
Coverage RA: 0d - 360d, DEC: -88d to +75d
PixelScale 1'/pixel (PMN), and 0.66' /pixel ((86+87) GB)
PixelUnits janskies/beam (ca. 200,000 beams/steradian)
Resolution 3.5' FWHM
CoordinateSystem Equatorial
Equinox 1950
Epoch Greenbank: 1986-11,1987-10
PMN: 1990
Projection Orthographic (SIN)
Reference Condon, et al., 1991; 1993, 1994

LABOCA Extended Chandra Deep Field South Submillimetre Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:CDFS LESS, CDFS: LESS

Description
The LABOCA Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) Submillimetre Survey (LESS) is a public legacy survey of the ECDFS at 870 ??m using the LABOCA camera (Siringo et al. 2009) on the APEX telescope.

The LABOCA data presented here were obtained between 2007 May and 2008 November in excellent conditions using time from both ESO and Max Planck allocations. The mapping pattern was designed to uniformly cover the 30'x30' extent of the ECDFS, centered on 03:32:29.0, -27:48:47.0 (J2000). The project used a total of 310 hrs of observations to achieve a beam-smoothed noise of 1.2 mJy/beam over 900 sq. arcmin (and <1.6mJy/beam over 1260 sq. arcmin). The flux calibration of the map came from observations of Mars, Uranus and Neptune (as well as secondary calibrators) and is accurate to within 8.5%.

Regime Radio
Frequency 345 GHz
Bandwidth 315-375 GHz
Provenance Data downloaded from ESO archive
Copyright Data freely available from ESO archive. When using data products provided in this release, it is requested that authors refer to the publication Weiss et al. 2009, ApJ, 707, 1201 In addition, please also use the following statement in articles using these data: "Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under programmes 078.F-9028(A), 079.F-9500(A), 080.A-3023(A), and 081.F-9500(A)."
NSurvey 1
Coverage 30'x30' in Chandra deep field south.
Resolution 19.2"
PixelSize6"
CoordinateSystemJ2000
ProjectionGnomonic
PixelUnitsJy/beam
Epoch2007-07-12/2008-10-04
Reference Paper and web site.>

CO Galactic Plane Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey: CO2D,CO

Description
New large-scale CO surveys of the first and second Galactic quadrants and the nearby molecular cloud complexes in Orion and Taurus, obtained with the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 1.2 m telescope, have been combined with 31 other surveys obtained over the past two decades with that instrument and a similar telescope on Cerro Tololo in Chile, to produce a new composite CO survey of the entire Milky Way. The survey consists of 488,000 spectra that Nyquist or beamwidth (1/8 deg) sample the entire Galactic plane over a strip 4 deg-10 deg wide in latitude, and beamwidth or 1/4 deg sample nearly all large local clouds at higher latitudes. Compared with the previous composite CO survey of Dame et al. (1987), the new survey has 16 times more spectra, up to 3.4 times higher angular resolution, and up to 10 times higher sensitivity per unit solid angle.

Users should be aware that both the angular resolution and the sensitivity varies from region to region in the velocity-integrated map. The component surveys were integrated individually using clipping or moment masking in order to display nearly all statistically significant emission but little noise above a level of ~1.5 K km/s. See the reference below and the Millimeter-Wave Group site for more details

Provenance Data taken by two nearly-identical 1.2 m telescopes in Cambridge, MA and on Cerro Tololo, Chile combined into a complete survey of the Milky Way with CO integrated over all velocities.
Copyright Permission is granted for publication and reproduction of this material for research or educational purposes so long as the reference (see below) is included.
Regime Radio
NSurvey 1
Frequency 115 GHz
Bandpass 114.89 - 115.12 GHz
Coverage 9,853 sq. deg; All galactic longitudes, irregular bands between -35 and +35 latitudes
PixelScale 0.125d/pixel
Resolution 9-18'
PixelUnits Pixel values are velocity-integrated main beam brightness temperature, in units of K km/s
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection Rectangular
Epoch 1980 to 2000
Reference Dame, T. M., Hartmann, Dap, Thaddeus, P., ApJ, 2001 (ADS)

Effelsberg-Bonn HI Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:EBHIS, EBHIS(NHI)

Description
The Effelsberg-Bonn HI Survey (EBHIS) is a 21-cm survey performed with the 100-m telescope at Effelsberg. It covers the whole northern sky out to a redshift of z ~ 0.07 and comprises HI line emission from the Milky Way and the Local Volume. This dataset is the atomic neutral hydrogen (HI) column density map derived from the Milky-Way part of EBHIS (|Vlsr| < 600 km/s).

Provenance Argelander-Institut für Astronomie (AIfA) and Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR); data provided by B. Winkel
Regime Radio
Copyright Permission is granted for publication and reproduction of this material for scientific, scholarly, educational, and private non-commercial use by the Argelander-Institut für Astronomie (AIfA) and the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR), Germany. In addition, please also use the following statement in articles using the data: "The EBHIS data are based on observations performed with the 100-m telescope of the MPIfR at Effelsberg. EBHIS was funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the grants KE757/7-1 to 7-3."
Frequency 1420 MHz
Coverage All sky where δ > -5
Bandpass 1417.5 - 1423.5 MHz
PixelScale 1.5'
PixelUnit atoms/cm2
Sensitivity 4.7 x 1018 cm-2
Resolution 10.8'
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 2009-2013
Reference Winkel et al., AA 585, A41, 2016; Kerp et al., 2011, AN 332, 637.

FIRST

Short name[s] used to specify survey:FIRST, VLA FIRST (1.4 GHz)

Description
The VLA FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-centimeters) is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. The FIRST home page has details of the instrumentation, status of the project, and data available. Currently about 5000 images of approximately .775x.58 degrees are available.

These FIRST data have been retrieved from the FIRST FTP archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute.

The FIRST survey is included on the SkyView High Resolution Radio Coverage map. This map shows coverage on an Aitoff projection of the sky in equatorial coordinates.

ProvenanceThe FIRST project team: R.J. Becker, D.H. Helfand, R.L. White M.D. Gregg. S.A. Laurent-Muehleisen.
Copyright 1994, University of California. Permission is granted for publication and reproduction of this material for scholarly, educational, and private non-commercial use. Inquiries for potential commercial uses should be addressed to:
              Robert Becker,                                
              Physics Dept,                               
              University of California,                     
              Davis, CA  95616
Regime Radio
NSurvey 1
Frequency 1.4 GHz Continuum
Bandpass 1.3635 - 1.4365 GHz
Coverage Eventually will cover entire North Galactic Polar region (about 10,000 square degrees). See Status of FIRST Survey Observations
PixelScale 1.8"/pixel
PixelUnits Janskies/beam
Resolution 5"
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Orthographic
Epoch 1993-2004, 2009-2011
Reference FIRST home page
Becker et al., 1995 (ADS)

GOODS North Observations with the VLA

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODSNVLA,GOODS: VLA North,GOODS N VLA

Description
A combination of VLA measurements in all four configurations combined to generate a very deep image of the GOODS North region. A total of about 150 hours of VLA time was used. Data are sensitive to about 5 microJanskies in the central region. A total of 1230 discrete sources where found in the 40'x40' region.

Provenance VLA Observations taken by Morrison et al. as provided through their web site.
CopyrightPublic domain
RegimeRadio
Frequency 1.4 GHz
Bandpass 1.365-1.435 GHz
PixelScale 0.5"
PixelUnitsJy/beam
NSurvey 1
Resolution1.7"
Coverage North GOODS field ~0.01% of sky
Projection Sin
Coordinates ICRS
Epoch1996-11/1996-12, 2005-2,2005-8,2005-12
Reference Morrison, et al, 2010

GTEE 0035 MHz Radio survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:0035MHz,35MHz,GTEE,GEETEE,GTEE 35MHz

Description
This survey is a mosaic of data taken at the low frequency T-array near Gauribidanur, India. The data was distributed in the NRAO Images from the Radio Sky CD ROM.

The original 287x101 tiles had only 1 pixel overlap. To allow higher order resampling, the data were retiled into two hemisphere files of 1726x600 pixels with an overlap of 10 pixels.

The southernmost tiles were only 287x100 pixels. We assumed that bottom row of these tiles (as compared with the others) was truncated.

CopyrightPublic domain
Regime Radio
Frequency 34.5 MHz
Bandpass 34.3 - 34.7 MHz
Coverage Complete between -50 and +70 degrees
PixelScale 0.105 x 0.20 degrees
PixelUnits Kelvins
Resolution 26' x 42'/cos(dec-14)
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 1950
Projection Rectangular
Epoch January 1987
Reference K.S. Dwarakanath and N. Udaya Shankar 1990, J. Astrophys. Astr., 11 323. (ADS)

The HI 4-PI Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:HI4PI,HI4PI(NHI)

Description
The HI 4-PI Survey (HI4PI) is a 21-cm all-sky survey of neutral atomic hydrogen. It is constructed from the Effelsberg-Bonn HI Survey (EBHIS), made with the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg/Germany, and the Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS), observed with the Parkes 64-m dish in Australia. HI4PI comprises HI line emission from the Milky Way. This dataset is the atomic neutral hydrogen (HI) column density map derived from HI4PI (|Vlsr| < 600 km/s).

Provenance Argelander-Institut f??r Astronomie (AIfA), Max-Planck-Institut f??r Radioastronomie (MPIfR), and CSIRO/Australia; data provided by B. Winkel
Regime Radio
Copyright Permission is granted for publication and reproduction of this material for scientific and educational purposes. When using data products provided in this release, it is requested that authors refer to the HI4PI publication. We also ask that publications making use of these data include the following acknowledgement: "The Parkes Radio Telescope is part of the Australia Telescope National Facility which is funded by the Australian Government for operation as a National Facility managed by CSIRO. The EBHIS data are based on observations performed with the 100-m telescope of the MPIfR at Effelsberg. EBHIS was funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the grants KE757/7-1 to 7-3.
Frequency 1420 MHz
Coverage All sky
Bandpass 1417.5 - 1423.5 MHz
PixelScale 1.5'
PixelUnit atoms/cm2
Sensitivity 2.3 x 1018 cm-2
Resolution 16.2'
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 2005-2013
Reference HI4PI Collaboration, AA 594, 116, 2016

Dickey and Lockman HI map

Short name[s] used to specify survey:nH,HI map

Description
This survey is derived from the 21cm maps presented by Dickey and Lockman in the ARAA 28, p215. The nH is derived assuming optically thin emission. The nH given should be considered a lower limit when the nH is greater than several times 1020.

Provenance provided by S. Snowden from data by Dickey and Lockman
Regime Radio
Copyright Public domain
Frequency 1420 MHz line survey
Bandpass 1418.8 - 1421.2 MHz
PixelScale 40'
PixelUnit atoms/cm^2
Resolution 1 degree
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Aitoff
Epoch 1980 to 1990
Reference Dickey and Lockman, ARAA 28, 1990, 215 (ADS)

NRA) VLA Sky Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey: NVSS,N-VSS

Description
SkyView has copied the NVSS intensity data from the NRAO FTP site. The full NVSS survey data includes information on other Stokes parameters.

Observations for the 1.4 GHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) began in 1993 September and should cover the sky north of -40 deg declination (82% of the celestial sphere) before the end of 1996. The principal data products are:

  1. A set of 2326 continuum map "cubes," each covering 4 deg X 4 deg with three planes containing Stokes I, Q, and U images. These maps were made with a relatively large restoring beam (45 arcsec FWHM) to yield the high surface-brightness sensitivity needed for completeness and photometric accuracy. Their rms brightness fluctuations are about 0.45 mJy/beam = 0.14 K (Stokes I) and 0.29 mJy/beam = 0.09 K (Stokes Q and U). The rms uncertainties in right ascension and declination vary from 0.3 arcsec for strong (S > 30 mJy) point sources to 5 arcsec for the faintest (S = 2.5 mJy) detectable sources.
  2. Lists of discrete sources.
The NVSS is being made as a service to the astronomical community, and the data products are being released as soon as they are produced and verified.

The NVSS survey is included on the SkyView High Resolution Radio Coverage map. This map shows coverage on an Aitoff projection of the sky in equatorial coordinates.

Provenance National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The NVSS project includes J. J. Condon, W. D. Cotton, E. W. Greisen, Q. F. Yin, R. A. Perley (NRAO), and J. J. Broderick (VPI).
Copyright Copyright 1994, Associated Universities, Inc., National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Permission is granted for publication and reproduction of this material for scholarly, educational, and private non-commerical use. 1994 Associated Universities, Inc. Inquiries for potential commercial uses should be addressed to: NRAO 520 Edgemont Road Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475

Regime Radio
NSurvey 1
Frequency 1.4 GHz Continuum
Bandpass 1.3628 - 1.4472 GHz
Coverage Declinations @gt; -40
PixelScale 15"/pixel
PixelUnits Janskies/beam
Resolution 45"
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Orthographic
Epoch 1993-1997
Reference NVSS home page Condon et al. 1998 (ADS)

VLA Survey of SDSS Stripe 82

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Stripe82VLA,Stripe 82 VLA

Description
This survey is a deep, high resolution radio survey of a relatively small region that has particularly deep coverage in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. As described in the reference abstract: This is a high-resolution radio survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Southern Equatorial Stripe, a.k.a., Stripe 82. This 1.4 GHz survey was conducted from 2007 to 2009 with the Very Large Array primarily in the A-configuration, with supplemental B-configuration data to increase sensitivity to extended structure. The survey has an angular resolution of 1.8" and achieves a median rms noise of 53 microJy/beam over 92 square degrees. This is the deepest 1.4 GHz survey to achieve this large of an area filling in the phase space between small&deep and large&shallow surveys.

The astrometric accuracy of the data is excellent with errors in observed sources of 0.10" in both RA and declination. A comparison with the SDSS DR7 Quasar Catalog confirms that the astrometry is well tied to the optical reference frame with mean offsets of 0.02+/-0.01" in RA and 0.01+/-0.02 in declination.

Provenance TBD
Regime Radio
NSurvey 1
Frequency 1.4 GHz Continuum
Bandpass 1.3635 - 1.4365 GHz
Coverage 92 square degrees (0.23%)
PixelScale 0.6"
PixelUnits Janskies/beam
Sensitivity 0.52 microJy/beam
Resolution 1.8"
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Orthographic
Epoch 2007-2009
Reference Survey paper: Hodge et al., AJ 142, 3, 2011

Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey: SUMSS, SUMSS 843 MHz

Description
The Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) is a deep radio survey at 843 MHz of the entire sky south of declination -30°, made using the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope ( MOST ), located near Canberra, Australia. The images from the SUMSS are produced as 4 x 4 degree mosaics of up to seventeen individual observations, to ensure even sensitivity across the sky. The mosaics slightly overlap each other. Data were last updated on January 28, 2015.

Images can also be obtained from the SUMSS Postage Stamp Server.

The SUMSS is intended to complement the NRAO-VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) which covered the sky between +90 and -40 deg declination, at a frequency of 1400MHz.

Provenance The SUMSS project team, University of Sydney
Copyright 1997-2000 School of Physics, The University of Sydney.
Permission is granted for publication and reproduction of this material for scholarly, educational, and private non-commerical use. Inquiries for potential commercial uses should be addressed to:

Dr. R.W. Hunstead or Dr. E.M. Sadler
Astrophysics Department, A29
University of Sydney
Sydney, NSW 2006
Australia
email: sumss@physics.usyd.edu.au
Regime Radio
NSurvey 1
Frequency 843 MHz
Bandpass 841.5 - 844.5 MhZ
Coverage Declination < -30°.
PixelScale 11" x 11" cosec (|Dec|). Default scale for retrieval is 11" x 11"
PixelUnits Janskys/beam
Resolution 45" (RA) x 45" cosec (|Dec|)
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Orthographic (SIN) representation of the NCP projection plane
Epoch 1997 to 2007
Reference ADS
SUMSS home page

GMRT 150 MHz All-sky Radio Survey: First Alternative Data Release

Short name[s] used to specify survey:TGSS, TGSS ADR1, TGSS_ADR1

Description
The first full release of a survey of the 150 MHz radio sky observed with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope between April 2010 and March 2012 as part of the TGSS project. Aimed at producing a reliable compact source survey, the automated data reduction pipeline efficiently processed more than 2000 hours of observations with minimal human interaction. Through application of innovative techniques such as image-based flagging, direction-dependent calibration of ionospheric phase errors, correcting for systematic offsets in antenna pointing, and improving the primary beam model, good quality images were created for over 95 percent of the 5336 pointings. This data release covers 36,900 square degrees (or 3.6 pi steradians) of the sky between -53 deg and +90 deg DEC, which is 90 percent of the total sky. The majority of pointing images have a background RMS noise below 5 mJy/beam with an approximate resolution of 25" x 25" (or 25" x 25" / cos (DEC - 19 deg) for pointings south of 19 deg DEC). The associated catalog has 640 thousand radio sources derived from an initial, high reliability source extraction at the 7 sigma level. The measured overall astrometric accuracy is better than 2" in RA and DEC, while the flux density accuracy is estimated at ~10 percent. Data is stored as 5336 mosaic images (5 deg x 5 deg).

SkyView uses Lanczos resampling and Sqrt image scaling by default for this survey.

ProvenanceTGS ADR Team
Copyright

© Public Domain.

If you are using the TGSS ADR survey products for your research, please add this reference (Intema et al. 2016) in your publication. Please also add the standard GMRT acknowledgement:
"We thank the staff of the GMRT that made these observations possible. GMRT is run by the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research."

Regime Radio
NSurvey 1
Frequency 150 MHz (2 meters)
Bandpass 140-156 MHz
Coverage All sky north of declination -53. (0.9 of all sky)
PixelScale 6.2"
PixelUnits μJy
Resolution 25"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Sine
Epoch April 2010 to March 2012
Reference Intema, et al., 2016, or TGSS web site.

VLA Low-frequency Sky Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:VLSSr,4MASS,VLSS

Description
The VLA Low-Frequency Sky Survey (VLSS) is a 74 MHz continuum survey covering the entire sky north of -30 degrees declination. Using the VLA in BnA and B-configurations, it will map the entire survey region at a resolution of 80" and with an average rms noise of 0.1 Jy/beam.

This version include the data from the VLSS redux which increased the coverage region slightly and substantially improved the data reduction. Details are in the Lane et al. (2012) reference.

Provenance VLSS Team: R.A. Perley, J.J. Condon, W.D. Cotton (NRAO); A.S. Cohen, W.M. Lane (NRC/NRL), N.E. Kassim, T.J.W. Lazio (NRL), W.C. Erickson (UMd)
Copyright
Regime Radio
NSurvey 1
Frequency 74 MHz
Bandpass 73.02-74.58 MHz
Coverage Declinations above -30 degrees
PixelScale 25"/pixel
PixelUnits Janskies/beam
Resolution 75"
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Orthographic (Sin)
Epoch ca. 2006
Reference VLSS download page . Details of the VLSSr reduction including comparisons with the original VLSS data are given in Lane et al. (2012)

Westerbork Northern Sky Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey: WENSS,W-NSS

Description
The Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) is a low-frequency radio survey that covers the whole sky north of delta=30 degree at a wavelength of 92 cm to a limiting flux density of approximately 18 mJy (5 sigma). This survey has a resolution of 54" x 54" cosec (delta) and a positional accuracy for strong sources of 1.5''.

Further information on the survey including links to catalogs derived from the survey is available at the WENSS web site.

The WENSS survey is included on the SkyView High Resolution Radio Coverage map. This map shows coverage on an Aitoff projection of the sky in equatorial coordinates.

Provenance WENSS Team. Data downloaded from WENSS FTP site 1999-03-18. The WENSS project is a collaboration between the Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy (NFRA/ASTRON) and the Leiden Observatory.
Copyright WENSS team. Anyone using data from the WENSS database in publications is asked to acknowledge this.
Regime Radio
NSurvey 1
Frequency 325 MHz Continuum
Bandpass 322.5 - 327.5 MHz
Coverage North of declination +30.
PixelScale 21"/pixel
PixelUnits Janskies/beam
Resolution 54" cosec(declination)
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 1950
Projection Orthographic
Epoch ca. 1991-1996
Reference Rengelink et al., 1997, A&A Supp. 124, p 259. ADS

Millimeter surveys

Planck 353 GHz Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Planck353,Planck 353,Planck-353

Description
Planck is ESA's third generation space based cosmic microwave background experiment, operating at nine frequencies between 30 and 857 GHz and was launched May 2009. Planck provides all-sky survey data at all nine frequencies with higher resolution at the 6 higher frequencies. It provides substantially higher resolution and sensitivity than WMAP. Planck orbits in the L2 Lagrange point. These data come from Release 1 of the Planck mission.

The original data are stored in HEALPix pixels. SkyView treats HEALPix as a standard projection but assumes that the HEALPix data is in a projection plane with a rotation of -45 degrees. The rotation transforms the HEALPix pixels from diamonds to squares so that the boundaries of the pixels are treated properly. The special HealPixImage class is used so that SkyView can use the HEALPix FITS files directly. The HealPixImage simulates a rectangular image but translates the pixels from that image to the nested HEALPix structure that is used by the HEALPix data. Users of the SkyView Jar will be able to access this survey through the web but performance may be poor since the FITS files are 150 to 600 MB in size and must be completely read in. SkyView will not automatically cache these files on the user machine as is done for non-HEALPix surveys.

Data from the frequencies of 100 GHz or higher are stored in a HEALPix file with a resolution of approximately 1.7' while lower frequencies are stored with half that resolution, approximately 3.4'.

Provenance Planck Team
Copyright
Regime Millimeter
NSurvey 9
Frequency 353 GHz
Bandpass 310-410 GHz
Coverage AllSky
PixelScale 1.7'
PixelUnits K
Resolution 5.0'
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection HEALPix
Epoch 2009-2013
Reference Planck Release 1 results

Planck 217 GHz Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Planck217,Planck 217,Planck-217

Description
Planck is ESA's third generation space based cosmic microwave background experiment, operating at nine frequencies between 30 and 857 GHz and was launched May 2009. Planck provides all-sky survey data at all nine frequencies with higher resolution at the 6 higher frequencies. It provides substantially higher resolution and sensitivity than WMAP. Planck orbits in the L2 Lagrange point. These data come from Release 1 of the Planck mission.

The original data are stored in HEALPix pixels. SkyView treats HEALPix as a standard projection but assumes that the HEALPix data is in a projection plane with a rotation of -45 degrees. The rotation transforms the HEALPix pixels from diamonds to squares so that the boundaries of the pixels are treated properly. The special HealPixImage class is used so that SkyView can use the HEALPix FITS files directly. The HealPixImage simulates a rectangular image but translates the pixels from that image to the nested HEALPix structure that is used by the HEALPix data. Users of the SkyView Jar will be able to access this survey through the web but performance may be poor since the FITS files are 150 to 600 MB in size and must be completely read in. SkyView will not automatically cache these files on the user machine as is done for non-HEALPix surveys.

Data from the frequencies of 100 GHz or higher are stored in a HEALPix file with a resolution of approximately 1.7' while lower frequencies are stored with half that resolution, approximately 3.4'.

Provenance Planck Team
Copyright
Regime Millimeter
NSurvey 9
Frequency 217 GHz
Bandpass 190-250 GHz
Coverage AllSky
PixelScale 1.7'
PixelUnits K
Resolution 5.5'
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection HEALPix
Epoch 2009-2013
Reference Planck Release 1 results

Planck 143 GHz Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Planck143,Planck 143,Planck-143

Description
Planck is ESA's third generation space based cosmic microwave background experiment, operating at nine frequencies between 30 and 857 GHz and was launched May 2009. Planck provides all-sky survey data at all nine frequencies with higher resolution at the 6 higher frequencies. It provides substantially higher resolution and sensitivity than WMAP. Planck orbits in the L2 Lagrange point. These data come from Release 1 of the Planck mission.

The original data are stored in HEALPix pixels. SkyView treats HEALPix as a standard projection but assumes that the HEALPix data is in a projection plane with a rotation of -45 degrees. The rotation transforms the HEALPix pixels from diamonds to squares so that the boundaries of the pixels are treated properly. The special HealPixImage class is used so that SkyView can use the HEALPix FITS files directly. The HealPixImage simulates a rectangular image but translates the pixels from that image to the nested HEALPix structure that is used by the HEALPix data. Users of the SkyView Jar will be able to access this survey through the web but performance may be poor since the FITS files are 150 to 600 MB in size and must be completely read in. SkyView will not automatically cache these files on the user machine as is done for non-HEALPix surveys.

Data from the frequencies of 100 GHz or higher are stored in a HEALPix file with a resolution of approximately 1.7' while lower frequencies are stored with half that resolution, approximately 3.4'.

Provenance Planck Team
Copyright
Regime Millimeter
NSurvey 9
Frequency 143 GHz
Bandpass 130-160 GHz
Coverage AllSky
PixelScale 1.7'
PixelUnits K
Resolution 7.1'
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection HEALPix
Epoch 2009-2013
Reference Planck Release 1 results

Planck 545 GHz Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Planck545,Planck 545,Planck-545

Description
Planck is ESA's third generation space based cosmic microwave background experiment, operating at nine frequencies between 30 and 857 GHz and was launched May 2009. Planck provides all-sky survey data at all nine frequencies with higher resolution at the 6 higher frequencies. It provides substantially higher resolution and sensitivity than WMAP. Planck orbits in the L2 Lagrange point. These data come from Release 1 of the Planck mission.

The original data are stored in HEALPix pixels. SkyView treats HEALPix as a standard projection but assumes that the HEALPix data is in a projection plane with a rotation of -45 degrees. The rotation transforms the HEALPix pixels from diamonds to squares so that the boundaries of the pixels are treated properly. The special HealPixImage class is used so that SkyView can use the HEALPix FITS files directly. The HealPixImage simulates a rectangular image but translates the pixels from that image to the nested HEALPix structure that is used by the HEALPix data. Users of the SkyView Jar will be able to access this survey through the web but performance may be poor since the FITS files are 150 to 600 MB in size and must be completely read in. SkyView will not automatically cache these files on the user machine as is done for non-HEALPix surveys.

Data from the frequencies of 100 GHz or higher are stored in a HEALPix file with a resolution of approximately 1.7' while lower frequencies are stored with half that resolution, approximately 3.4'.

Provenance Planck Team
Copyright
Regime Millimeter
NSurvey 9
Frequency 545 GHz
Bandpass 450-650 GHz
Coverage AllSky
PixelScale 1.7'
PixelUnits MJy/sr
Resolution 5.0'
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection HEALPix
Epoch 2009-2013
Reference Planck Release 1 results

Planck 030 GHz Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Planck030,Planck 030,Planck-030

Description
Planck is ESA's third generation space based cosmic microwave background experiment, operating at nine frequencies between 30 and 857 GHz and was launched May 2009. Planck provides all-sky survey data at all nine frequencies with higher resolution at the 6 higher frequencies. It provides substantially higher resolution and sensitivity than WMAP. Planck orbits in the L2 Lagrange point. These data come from Release 1 of the Planck mission.

The original data are stored in HEALPix pixels. SkyView treats HEALPix as a standard projection but assumes that the HEALPix data is in a projection plane with a rotation of -45 degrees. The rotation transforms the HEALPix pixels from diamonds to squares so that the boundaries of the pixels are treated properly. The special HealPixImage class is used so that SkyView can use the HEALPix FITS files directly. The HealPixImage simulates a rectangular image but translates the pixels from that image to the nested HEALPix structure that is used by the HEALPix data. Users of the SkyView Jar will be able to access this survey through the web but performance may be poor since the FITS files are 150 to 600 MB in size and must be completely read in. SkyView will not automatically cache these files on the user machine as is done for non-HEALPix surveys.

Data from the frequencies of 100 GHz or higher are stored in a HEALPix file with a resolution of approximately 1.7' while lower frequencies are stored with half that resolution, approximately 3.4'.

Provenance Planck Team
Copyright
Regime Millimeter
NSurvey 9
Frequency 030 GHz
Bandpass 20-33 GHz
Coverage AllSky
PixelScale 3.4'
PixelUnits K
Resolution 33'
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection HEALPix
Epoch 2009-2013
Reference Planck Release 1 results

Planck 100 GHz Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Planck100,Planck 100,Planck-100

Description
Planck is ESA's third generation space based cosmic microwave background experiment, operating at nine frequencies between 30 and 857 GHz and was launched May 2009. Planck provides all-sky survey data at all nine frequencies with higher resolution at the 6 higher frequencies. It provides substantially higher resolution and sensitivity than WMAP. Planck orbits in the L2 Lagrange point. These data come from Release 1 of the Planck mission.

The original data are stored in HEALPix pixels. SkyView treats HEALPix as a standard projection but assumes that the HEALPix data is in a projection plane with a rotation of -45 degrees. The rotation transforms the HEALPix pixels from diamonds to squares so that the boundaries of the pixels are treated properly. The special HealPixImage class is used so that SkyView can use the HEALPix FITS files directly. The HealPixImage simulates a rectangular image but translates the pixels from that image to the nested HEALPix structure that is used by the HEALPix data. Users of the SkyView Jar will be able to access this survey through the web but performance may be poor since the FITS files are 150 to 600 MB in size and must be completely read in. SkyView will not automatically cache these files on the user machine as is done for non-HEALPix surveys.

Data from the frequencies of 100 GHz or higher are stored in a HEALPix file with a resolution of approximately 1.7' while lower frequencies are stored with half that resolution, approximately 3.4'.

Provenance Planck Team
Copyright
Regime Millimeter
NSurvey 9
Frequency 100 GHz
Bandpass 85-130 GHz
Coverage AllSky
PixelScale 1.7'
PixelUnits K
Resolution 10'
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection HEALPix
Epoch 2009-2013
Reference Planck Release 1 results

Planck 070 GHz Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Planck070,Planck 070,Planck-070

Description
Planck is ESA's third generation space based cosmic microwave background experiment, operating at nine frequencies between 30 and 857 GHz and was launched May 2009. Planck provides all-sky survey data at all nine frequencies with higher resolution at the 6 higher frequencies. It provides substantially higher resolution and sensitivity than WMAP. Planck orbits in the L2 Lagrange point. These data come from Release 1 of the Planck mission.

The original data are stored in HEALPix pixels. SkyView treats HEALPix as a standard projection but assumes that the HEALPix data is in a projection plane with a rotation of -45 degrees. The rotation transforms the HEALPix pixels from diamonds to squares so that the boundaries of the pixels are treated properly. The special HealPixImage class is used so that SkyView can use the HEALPix FITS files directly. The HealPixImage simulates a rectangular image but translates the pixels from that image to the nested HEALPix structure that is used by the HEALPix data. Users of the SkyView Jar will be able to access this survey through the web but performance may be poor since the FITS files are 150 to 600 MB in size and must be completely read in. SkyView will not automatically cache these files on the user machine as is done for non-HEALPix surveys.

Data from the frequencies of 100 GHz or higher are stored in a HEALPix file with a resolution of approximately 1.7' while lower frequencies are stored with half that resolution, approximately 3.4'.

Provenance Planck Team
Copyright
Regime Millimeter
NSurvey 9
Frequency 070 GHz
Bandpass 60-80 GHz
Coverage AllSky
PixelScale 3.4'
PixelUnits K
Resolution 14'
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection HEALPix
Epoch 2009-2013
Reference Planck Release 1 results

Planck 857 GHz Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Planck857,Planck 857,Planck-857

Description
Planck is ESA's third generation space based cosmic microwave background experiment, operating at nine frequencies between 30 and 857 GHz and was launched May 2009. Planck provides all-sky survey data at all nine frequencies with higher resolution at the 6 higher frequencies. It provides substantially higher resolution and sensitivity than WMAP. Planck orbits in the L2 Lagrange point. These data come from Release 1 of the Planck mission.

The original data are stored in HEALPix pixels. SkyView treats HEALPix as a standard projection but assumes that the HEALPix data is in a projection plane with a rotation of -45 degrees. The rotation transforms the HEALPix pixels from diamonds to squares so that the boundaries of the pixels are treated properly. The special HealPixImage class is used so that SkyView can use the HEALPix FITS files directly. The HealPixImage simulates a rectangular image but translates the pixels from that image to the nested HEALPix structure that is used by the HEALPix data. Users of the SkyView Jar will be able to access this survey through the web but performance may be poor since the FITS files are 150 to 600 MB in size and must be completely read in. SkyView will not automatically cache these files on the user machine as is done for non-HEALPix surveys.

Data from the frequencies of 100 GHz or higher are stored in a HEALPix file with a resolution of approximately 1.7' while lower frequencies are stored with half that resolution, approximately 3.4'.

Provenance Planck Team
Copyright
Regime Millimeter
NSurvey 9
Frequency 857 GHz
Bandpass 750-1000 GHz
Coverage AllSky
PixelScale 1.7'
PixelUnits MJy/sr
Resolution 5.0'
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection HEALPix
Epoch 2009-2013
Reference Planck Release 1 results

Planck 044 GHz Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Planck044,Planck 044,Planck-044

Description
Planck is ESA's third generation space based cosmic microwave background experiment, operating at nine frequencies between 30 and 857 GHz and was launched May 2009. Planck provides all-sky survey data at all nine frequencies with higher resolution at the 6 higher frequencies. It provides substantially higher resolution and sensitivity than WMAP. Planck orbits in the L2 Lagrange point. These data come from Release 1 of the Planck mission.

The original data are stored in HEALPix pixels. SkyView treats HEALPix as a standard projection but assumes that the HEALPix data is in a projection plane with a rotation of -45 degrees. The rotation transforms the HEALPix pixels from diamonds to squares so that the boundaries of the pixels are treated properly. The special HealPixImage class is used so that SkyView can use the HEALPix FITS files directly. The HealPixImage simulates a rectangular image but translates the pixels from that image to the nested HEALPix structure that is used by the HEALPix data. Users of the SkyView Jar will be able to access this survey through the web but performance may be poor since the FITS files are 150 to 600 MB in size and must be completely read in. SkyView will not automatically cache these files on the user machine as is done for non-HEALPix surveys.

Data from the frequencies of 100 GHz or higher are stored in a HEALPix file with a resolution of approximately 1.7' while lower frequencies are stored with half that resolution, approximately 3.4'.

Provenance Planck Team
Copyright
Regime Millimeter
NSurvey 9
Frequency 044 GHz
Bandpass 39-58 GHz
Coverage AllSky
PixelScale 3.4'
PixelUnits K
Resolution 24'
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection HEALPix
Epoch 2009-2013
Reference Planck Release 1 results

Infrared surveys

Two Micron All Sky Survey (H-Band)

Short name[s] used to specify survey:2MASSH,2MASS-H

Description
2MASS data were collected by uniformly scanning the entire sky in three near-infrared bands to detect and characterize point sources brighter than about 1 mJy in each band, with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) greater than 10, using a pixel size of 2.0". This achieves an 80,000-fold improvement in sensitivity relative to earlier surveys. 2MASS used two new, highly-automated 1.3-m telescopes, one at Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and one at CTIO, Chile. Each telescope is equipped with a three-channel camera, each channel consisting of a 256 by 256 array of HgCdTe detectors, capable of observing the sky simultaneously at J (1.25 microns), H (1.65 microns), and Ks (2.17 microns).

2MASS images and other data products can be obtained at the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive

Provenance The Two Micron All Sky Survey is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation.
Copyright Researchers are asked to include the following acknowledgment in any published material that makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS):

"This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation."

Regime Infrared
NSurvey 3
Frequency 180 THz (1.65 microns)
Bandpass 167-197 THz
Coverage All sky
PixelScale 1"/pixel
PixelUnits
Resolution 4"
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Orthographic (SIN)
Epoch 1997 - 2002
Reference 2MASS web site

Two Micron All Sky Survey (J-Band)

Short name[s] used to specify survey:2MASSJ,2MASS-J

Description
2MASS data were collected by uniformly scanning the entire sky in three near-infrared bands to detect and characterize point sources brighter than about 1 mJy in each band, with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) greater than 10, using a pixel size of 2.0". This achieves an 80,000-fold improvement in sensitivity relative to earlier surveys. 2MASS used two new, highly-automated 1.3-m telescopes, one at Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and one at CTIO, Chile. Each telescope is equipped with a three-channel camera, each channel consisting of a 256 by 256 array of HgCdTe detectors, capable of observing the sky simultaneously at J (1.25 microns), H (1.65 microns), and Ks (2.17 microns).

2MASS images and other data products can be obtained at the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive

Provenance The Two Micron All Sky Survey is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation.
Copyright Researchers are asked to include the following acknowledgment in any published material that makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS):

"This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation."

Regime Infrared
NSurvey 3
Frequency 240 THz (1.25 microns)
Bandpass 222-375 THz
Coverage All sky
PixelScale 1"/pixel
PixelUnits
Resolution 4"
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Orthographic (SIN)
Epoch 1997 - 2002
Reference 2MASS web site

Two Micron All Sky Survey (K-Band)

Short name[s] used to specify survey:2MASSK,2MASS-K

Description
2MASS data were collected by uniformly scanning the entire sky in three near-infrared bands to detect and characterize point sources brighter than about 1 mJy in each band, with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) greater than 10, using a pixel size of 2.0". This achieves an 80,000-fold improvement in sensitivity relative to earlier surveys. 2MASS used two new, highly-automated 1.3-m telescopes, one at Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and one at CTIO, Chile. Each telescope is equipped with a three-channel camera, each channel consisting of a 256 by 256 array of HgCdTe detectors, capable of observing the sky simultaneously at J (1.25 microns), H (1.65 microns), and Ks (2.17 microns).

2MASS images and other data products can be obtained at the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive

Provenance The Two Micron All Sky Survey is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation.
Copyright Researchers are asked to include the following acknowledgment in any published material that makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS):

"This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation."

Regime Infrared
NSurvey 3
Frequency 137 THz (2.17 microns)
Bandpass 129-222 THz
Coverage All sky
PixelScale 1"/pixel
PixelUnits
Resolution 4"
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Orthographic (SIN)
Epoch 1997 - 2002
Reference 2MASS web site

AKARI N160

Short name[s] used to specify survey:AKARI N160, AKARI-N160, AKARI_N160

Description
The AKARI (formerly Astro-F) mission is a Japanese second generation all-sky infrared survey mission. SkyView currently includes surveys from the four bands of the FIS instrument: N60, WIDE-S, WIDE-L and N160.

These surveys cover 99% of the sky in four photometric bands centred at 65??m, 90??m, 140??m, and 160??m, with spatial resolutions ranging from 1-1.5'.

These data provide crucial information on the investigation and characterisation of the proper- ties of dusty material in the interstellar medium (ISM), since a significant portion of its energy is emitted between ???50 and 200 ??m. The large-scale distribution of interstellar clouds, their thermal dust temperatures, and their column densities can be investigated with the improved spatial resolution compared to earlier all-sky survey observations. In addition to the point source distribution, the large-scale distribution of ISM cirrus emis- sion, and its filamentary structure, are well traced.

Data are obtained using using the JVO AKARI Simple Image Access Service.

Provenance AKARI FIS map making team [Univ of Tokyo, ISAS/JAXA, Tohoku Univ, Tsukuba Univ, The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, The Open Univ]
Copyright
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency1.7 x 1012
Bandpass 1.3-2.1 x 1012
Coverage All Sky
PixelScale 44.2"
PixelUnits MJy/sr
Resolution 88"
Coordinates Ecliptic
Projection Tangent plane
Epoch 2006-2007
ReferenceDoi, et al., 2016 and Takita, et al. 2015

AKARI N60

Short name[s] used to specify survey:AKARI N60, AKARI-N60, AKARI_N60

Description
The AKARI (formerly Astro-F) mission is a Japanese second generation all-sky infrared survey mission. SkyView currently includes surveys from the four bands of the FIS instrument: N60, WIDE-S, WIDE-L and N160.

These surveys cover 99% of the sky in four photometric bands centred at 65??m, 90??m, 140??m, and 160??m, with spatial resolutions ranging from 1-1.5'.

These data provide crucial information on the investigation and characterisation of the proper- ties of dusty material in the interstellar medium (ISM), since a significant portion of its energy is emitted between ???50 and 200 ??m. The large-scale distribution of interstellar clouds, their thermal dust temperatures, and their column densities can be investigated with the improved spatial resolution compared to earlier all-sky survey observations. In addition to the point source distribution, the large-scale distribution of ISM cirrus emis- sion, and its filamentary structure, are well traced.

Data are obtained using using the JVO AKARI Simple Image Access Service.

Provenance AKARI FIS map making team [Univ of Tokyo, ISAS/JAXA, Tohoku Univ, Tsukuba Univ, The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, The Open Univ]
Copyright
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency5 x 1012
Bandpass 3.7-6.0 x 1012
Coverage All Sky
PixelScale 26.8"
PixelUnits MJy/sr
Resolution 63"
Coordinates Ecliptic
Projection Tangent plane
Epoch 2006-2007
ReferenceDoi, et al., 2016 and Takita, et al. 2015

AKARI WIDE-L

Short name[s] used to specify survey:AKARI WIDE-L, AKARI-WIDE-L, AKARI_WIDE-L

Description
The AKARI (formerly Astro-F) mission is a Japanese second generation all-sky infrared survey mission. SkyView currently includes surveys from the four bands of the FIS instrument: N60, WIDE-S, WIDE-L and N160.

These surveys cover 99% of the sky in four photometric bands centred at 65??m, 90??m, 140??m, and 160??m, with spatial resolutions ranging from 1-1.5'.

These data provide crucial information on the investigation and characterisation of the proper- ties of dusty material in the interstellar medium (ISM), since a significant portion of its energy is emitted between ???50 and 200 ??m. The large-scale distribution of interstellar clouds, their thermal dust temperatures, and their column densities can be investigated with the improved spatial resolution compared to earlier all-sky survey observations. In addition to the point source distribution, the large-scale distribution of ISM cirrus emis- sion, and its filamentary structure, are well traced.

Data are obtained using using the JVO AKARI Simple Image Access Service.

Provenance AKARI FIS map making team [Univ of Tokyo, ISAS/JAXA, Tohoku Univ, Tsukuba Univ, The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, The Open Univ]
Copyright
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency2.14 x 1012
Bandpass 1.7-2.7 x 1012
Coverage All Sky
PixelScale 44.2"
PixelUnits MJy/sr
Resolution 88"
Coordinates Ecliptic
Projection Tangent plane
Epoch 2006-2007
ReferenceDoi, et al., 2016 and Takita, et al. 2015

AKARI WIDE-S

Short name[s] used to specify survey:AKARI WIDE-S, AKARI-WIDE-S, AKARI_WIDE-S

Description
The AKARI (formerly Astro-F) mission is a Japanese second generation all-sky infrared survey mission. SkyView currently includes surveys from the four bands of the FIS instrument: N60, WIDE-S, WIDE-L and N160.

These surveys cover 99% of the sky in four photometric bands centred at 65??m, 90??m, 140??m, and 160??m, with spatial resolutions ranging from 1-1.5'.

These data provide crucial information on the investigation and characterisation of the proper- ties of dusty material in the interstellar medium (ISM), since a significant portion of its energy is emitted between ???50 and 200 ??m. The large-scale distribution of interstellar clouds, their thermal dust temperatures, and their column densities can be investigated with the improved spatial resolution compared to earlier all-sky survey observations. In addition to the point source distribution, the large-scale distribution of ISM cirrus emis- sion, and its filamentary structure, are well traced.

Data are obtained using using the JVO AKARI Simple Image Access Service.

Provenance AKARI FIS map making team [Univ of Tokyo, ISAS/JAXA, Tohoku Univ, Tsukuba Univ, The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, The Open Univ]
Copyright
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency3.3 x 1012
Bandpass 2.7-5.0 x 1012
Coverage All Sky
PixelScale 26.8"
PixelUnits MJy/sr
Resolution 78"
Coordinates Ecliptic
Projection Tangent plane
Epoch 2006-2007
ReferenceDoi, et al., 2016 and Takita, et al. 2015

Cosmic Background Explorer DIRBE Annual Average Map

Short name[s] used to specify survey: COBEAAM, COBE DIRBE/AAM

Description
The DIRBE Project Data Sets cover the whole sky and provide photometric data in 10 bands ranging in wavelength from 1.25 to 240 microns. SkyView has supported three maps: an early averaged map including including zodiacal and Galactic components (COBE DIRBE (OLD)), a more recent cleaner version of that data (COBE DIRBE/AAM) and a map with the zodaical light subtracted out (COBE DIRBE/ZSMA). The early data is no longer supported. Please contact us if you want access to these data.

Detailed descriptions of the DIRBE, the data processing, and the data products are given in an Explanatory Supplement. A Small Source Spectral Energy Distribution Browser can be used to assess the visibility of an unresolved or small extended source in the DIRBE data and see its spectral energy distribution. As noted in section 5.6.6 of the Explanatory Supplement, the DIRBE Time-ordered Data are required to derive definitive point source fluxes.

These maps provide an estimate of the infrared intensity at each pixel and wavelength band based on an interpolation of the observations made at various times at solar elongations close to 90°.

These COBE DIRBE maps are a combination original ten band passes with the following wavelengths:

The default two dimensional array uses Band 8 (100 µm).

The COBE DIRBE/Annual Average Maps (AAM) is the cumulative weighted average of the photometry. This average is calculated using the weighted number of observations from each Weekly Averaged Map ( WtNumObs from the Weekly Averaged Map) as the weight, such that annual_average =sum( weekly_average * weekly_weight )/ sum( weekly_weight )

COBE DIRBE/Zodi-Subtracted Mission Average (ZSMA) Skymap represents the extra-Solar system sky brightness. It is the average residual map that results after the modelled interplanetary dust (IPD) signal is subtracted from each of the DIRBE Weekly Skymaps from the cryogenic mission. Individual weekly residual maps can be reconstructed from the data supplied in the DIRBE Sky and Zodi Atlas (DSZA).

Provenance COBE Team
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 2 (10 bands)
Frequency 1.25-240 THz
Frequency Bands
BandCentralMin
10 1.2491 THz 1.0016 THz 1.4966 THz
9 2.1414 THz 1.8394 THz 2.1717 THz
8 2.9979 THz 2.5159 THz 3.4799 THz
7 4.9965 THz 3.8365 THz 6.1565 THz
6 11.992 THz 9.9270 THz 14.057 THz
5 24.983 THz 18.333 THz 31.633 THz
4 61.182 THz 57.087 THz 65.277 THz
3 85.655 THz 74.655 THz 96.655 THz
2 136.70 THz 1.2550 THz 147.90 THz
1 239.83 THz 210.08 THz 269.58 THz
Coverage All-sky
Scale 0.32 deg/pix
Units MJy/sr
Resolution ca. .75 deg
Coordinates Ecliptic
Projection CobeCube (CSC)
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1989-1990
Reference COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) Explanatory Supplement ed. M.G. Hauser, T. Kelsall, D. Leisawitz, and J. Weiland COBE Ref. Pub. No. 97-A (Greenbelt, MD: NASA/GSFC) available in electronic form (in a slightly more up-to-date version) from the COBE Web page. Specific DIRBE information is available including an instrument description (PostScript).

Cosmic Background Explorer DIRBE Zodi-Subtracted Mission Average

Short name[s] used to specify survey: COBEZSMA, COBE DIRBE/ZSMA

Description
The DIRBE Project Data Sets cover the whole sky and provide photometric data in 10 bands ranging in wavelength from 1.25 to 240 microns. SkyView has supported three maps: an early averaged map including including zodiacal and Galactic components (COBE DIRBE (OLD)), a more recent cleaner version of that data (COBE DIRBE/AAM) and a map with the zodaical light subtracted out (COBE DIRBE/ZSMA). The early data is no longer supported. Please contact us if you want access to these data.

Detailed descriptions of the DIRBE, the data processing, and the data products are given in an Explanatory Supplement. A Small Source Spectral Energy Distribution Browser can be used to assess the visibility of an unresolved or small extended source in the DIRBE data and see its spectral energy distribution. As noted in section 5.6.6 of the Explanatory Supplement, the DIRBE Time-ordered Data are required to derive definitive point source fluxes.

These maps provide an estimate of the infrared intensity at each pixel and wavelength band based on an interpolation of the observations made at various times at solar elongations close to 90°.

These COBE DIRBE maps are a combination original ten band passes with the following wavelengths:

The default two dimensional array uses Band 8 (100 µm).

The COBE DIRBE/Annual Average Maps (AAM) is the cumulative weighted average of the photometry. This average is calculated using the weighted number of observations from each Weekly Averaged Map ( WtNumObs from the Weekly Averaged Map) as the weight, such that annual_average =sum( weekly_average * weekly_weight )/ sum( weekly_weight )

COBE DIRBE/Zodi-Subtracted Mission Average (ZSMA) Skymap represents the extra-Solar system sky brightness. It is the average residual map that results after the modelled interplanetary dust (IPD) signal is subtracted from each of the DIRBE Weekly Skymaps from the cryogenic mission. Individual weekly residual maps can be reconstructed from the data supplied in the DIRBE Sky and Zodi Atlas (DSZA).

Provenance COBE Team
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 2 (10 bands)
Frequency 1.25-240 THz
Frequency Bands
BandCentralMin
10 1.2491 THz 1.0016 THz 1.4966 THz
9 2.1414 THz 1.8394 THz 2.1717 THz
8 2.9979 THz 2.5159 THz 3.4799 THz
7 4.9965 THz 3.8365 THz 6.1565 THz
6 11.992 THz 9.9270 THz 14.057 THz
5 24.983 THz 18.333 THz 31.633 THz
4 61.182 THz 57.087 THz 65.277 THz
3 85.655 THz 74.655 THz 96.655 THz
2 136.70 THz 1.2550 THz 147.90 THz
1 239.83 THz 210.08 THz 269.58 THz
Coverage All-sky
Scale 0.32 deg/pix
Units MJy/sr
Resolution ca. .75 deg
Coordinates Ecliptic
Projection CobeCube (CSC)
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1989-1990
Reference COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) Explanatory Supplement ed. M.G. Hauser, T. Kelsall, D. Leisawitz, and J. Weiland COBE Ref. Pub. No. 97-A (Greenbelt, MD: NASA/GSFC) available in electronic form (in a slightly more up-to-date version) from the COBE Web page. Specific DIRBE information is available including an instrument description (PostScript).

2nd Digitized Sky Survey-Near Infrared

Short name[s] used to specify survey:DSS2IR, DSS2 IR

Description
This survey was generated by scanning Schmidt near-IR plates of the sky at 1" resolution. Scanning and compression was performed at the Space Telescope Science Institute. See the ST DSS site for further details.

The native projection of these data is described as a high-order polynomial distortion of a gnomonic projection using the same terms as the DSS.

SkyView has a copy of the compressed images which cover the entire sky. In previous versions of SkyView (prior to July 2007), this survey was served as a remote survey and data was retrieved in tiles from the ST ScI web site. Image generation using the local copy should be much faster at the SkyView web site. However data from this survey is not currently cached when it is used in the SkyView-in-a-Jar application so that data will be downloaded from the SkyView web site whenever an image is requested. Future updates to SkyView-in-a-Jar should address this caching issue.

.
Provenance Data taken by ROE, AAO, and CalTech, Compression and distribution by Space Telescope Science Institute.
Copyright There are multiple copyright holders depending upon the source plate or plates. See full copyright notices The coverage link below describes the coverage for each element of the surveys when the original plate used is not included in the SkyView files.
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 1
Frequency 353 THz
Bandpass 327-422 THz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 1"
PixelUnits Pixel values are given as scaled densities
Resolution Depends on plate. Typically 2-3".
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Schmidt
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1987-2002
Reference Some information on the DSS2 is given in McLean, 2000, The Second Generation Guide Star Catalog.
Characteristics of the DSS surveys are summarized in this document.

GOODS Herschel 100 micron, DR1 data release

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODSHerschel1, GOODS Herschel 100, GOODS: Herschel 100

Description
GOODS-Herschel is an open time key program of more than 360 hours of observation with the Hershel, SPIRE and PACS, from 100 um and 500.

North and South GOODS data is available for 100 and 160 microns (using PACS) but only the northern field is available at 250, 350 and 500 microns (using SPIRE).

Note that the scale and resolution of the underlying pixels is different in each band.

RegimeInfrared
Frequency3 THz
Bandpass2.5-3.5 THz
Provenance Downloaded from the Herschel Database in Marseille. Release DR1.
Copyright All papers using GOODS-Herschel data downloaded from HeDaM should include the following acknowledgements: The GOODS-Herschel data was accessed through the Herschel Database in Marseille (HeDaM) - http://hedam.lam.fr - operated by CeSAM and hosted by the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille.
NSurvey 5
PixelScale 1.2"
Resolution 6.7"
PixelUnits Jy/pixel
CoverageNorth and South GOODS Fields. 1.5e-6
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
Epoch2009/2011
Reference Elbaz, et al 2011

GOODS Herschel 160 micron, DR1 data release

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODSHerschel2, GOODS Herschel 160, GOODS: Herschel 160

Description
GOODS-Herschel is an open time key program of more than 360 hours of observation with the Hershel, SPIRE and PACS, from 100 um and 500.

North and South GOODS data is available for 100 and 160 microns (using PACS) but only the northern field is available at 250, 350 and 500 microns (using SPIRE).

Note that the scale and resolution of the underlying pixels is different in each band.

RegimeInfrared
Frequency1.9 THz
Bandpass1.6-2.2 THz
Provenance Downloaded from the Herschel Database in Marseille. Release DR1.
Copyright All papers using GOODS-Herschel data downloaded from HeDaM should include the following acknowledgements: The GOODS-Herschel data was accessed through the Herschel Database in Marseille (HeDaM) - http://hedam.lam.fr - operated by CeSAM and hosted by the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille.
NSurvey 5
PixelScale 2.4"
Resolution 11.0"
PixelUnits Jy/pixel
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
CoverageNorth and South GOODS fields: 1.e-5
Epoch2009/2011
Reference Elbaz, et al 2011

GOODS Herschel 250 micron, DR1 data release

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODSHerschel3, GOODS Herschel 250, GOODS: Herschel 250

Description
GOODS-Herschel is an open time key program of more than 360 hours of observation with the Hershel, SPIRE and PACS, from 100 um and 500.

North and South GOODS data is available for 100 and 160 microns (using PACS) but only the northern field is available at 250, 350 and 500 microns (using SPIRE).

Note that the scale and resolution of the underlying pixels is different in each band.

RegimeInfrared
Frequency1.2 THz
Bandpass1.0-1.4 THz
Provenance Downloaded from the Herschel Database in Marseille. Release DR1.
Copyright All papers using GOODS-Herschel data downloaded from HeDaM should include the following acknowledgements: The GOODS-Herschel data was accessed through the Herschel Database in Marseille (HeDaM) - http://hedam.lam.fr - operated by CeSAM and hosted by the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille.
NSurvey 5
PixelScale 3.6"
Resolution 18.1"
PixelUnits Jy/pixel
CoverageExtended North GOODS Fields. 1.6e-5
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
Epoch2009/2011
Reference Elbaz, et al 2011

GOODS Herschel 350 micron, DR1 data release

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODSHerschel4, GOODS Herschel 350, GOODS: Herschel 350

Description
GOODS-Herschel is an open time key program of more than 360 hours of observation with the Hershel, SPIRE and PACS, from 100 um and 500.

North and South GOODS data is available for 100 and 160 microns (using PACS) but only the northern field is available at 250, 350 and 500 microns (using SPIRE).

Note that the scale and resolution of the underlying pixels is different in each band.

RegimeInfrared
Frequency860 MHz
Bandpass740-1000 MHz
Provenance Downloaded from the Herschel Database in Marseille. Release DR1.
Copyright All papers using GOODS-Herschel data downloaded from HeDaM should include the following acknowledgements: The GOODS-Herschel data was accessed through the Herschel Database in Marseille (HeDaM) - http://hedam.lam.fr - operated by CeSAM and hosted by the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille.
NSurvey 5
PixelScale 4.8"
Resolution 24.9"
PixelUnits Jy/pixel
CoverageExtended North GOODS Fields. 1.6e-5
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
Epoch2009/2011
Reference Elbaz, et al 2011

GOODS Herschel 500 micron, DR1 data release

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODSHerschel5, GOODS Herschel 500, GOODS: Herschel 500

Description
GOODS-Herschel is an open time key program of more than 360 hours of observation with the Hershel, SPIRE and PACS, from 100 um and 500.

North and South GOODS data is available for 100 and 160 microns (using PACS) but only the northern field is available at 250, 350 and 500 microns (using SPIRE).

Note that the scale and resolution of the underlying pixels is different in each band.

RegimeInfrared
Frequency600 MHz
Bandpass510-700 MHz
Provenance Downloaded from the Herschel Database in Marseille. Release DR1.
Copyright All papers using GOODS-Herschel data downloaded from HeDaM should include the following acknowledgements: The GOODS-Herschel data was accessed through the Herschel Database in Marseille (HeDaM) - http://hedam.lam.fr - operated by CeSAM and hosted by the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille.
NSurvey 5
PixelScale 7.2"
Resolution 36.6"
PixelUnits Jy/pixel
CoverageExtended North GOODS Fields. 1.6e-5
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
Epoch2009/2011
Reference Elbaz, et al 2011

Spitzer IRAC GOODS 3.6 micron data, channel 1

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODSIRAC 1, GOODS IRAC 1, GOODS IRAC 3.6, GOODS: Spitzer IRAC 3.6

Description
Spitzer IRAC medium infrared observations taken in all four IRAC channels in both the north and south GOODS fields.

Provenance IRAC Goods Team, IRSA data center
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 8.33 THz
Bandpass 7.58-9.43 THz
Coverage GOODS North and South (approximately 0.01% of sky).
PixelScale0.5"
PixelUnitsDN/s
Resolution 1.7" in bands 1-3, 1.9" in band 4
CoordinateSystem ICRS
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch2004-02-08/2004-05-26
Reference The IRAC observation characteristics are summarized in this analysis paper while the discussion of how the data are archived are found in data release documentation.

Spitzer IRAC GOODS 4.5 micron data, channel 2

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODSIRAC 2, GOODS IRAC 2, GOODS IRAC 4.5, GOODS: Spitzer IRAC 4.5

Description
Spitzer IRAC medium infrared observations taken in all four IRAC channels in both the north and south GOODS fields.

Provenance IRAC Goods Team, IRSA data center
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 6.66 THz
Bandpass 5.98-7.59 THz
Coverage GOODS North and South (approximately 0.01% of sky).
PixelScale0.5"
PixelUnitsDN/s
Resolution 1.7" in bands 1-3, 1.9" in band 4
CoordinateSystem ICRS
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch2004-02-08/2004-05-26
Reference The IRAC observation characteristics are summarized in this analysis paper while the discussion of how the data are archived are found in data release documentation.

Spitzer IRAC GOODS 5.8 micron data, channel 3

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODSIRAC 3, GOODS IRAC 3, GOODS IRAC 5.8, GOODS: Spitzer IRAC 5.8

Description
Spitzer IRAC medium infrared observations taken in all four IRAC channels in both the north and south GOODS fields.

Provenance IRAC Goods Team, IRSA data center
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 5.17 THz
Bandpass 4.65-5.98 THz
Coverage GOODS North and South (approximately 0.01% of sky).
PixelScale0.5"
PixelUnitsDN/s
Resolution 1.7" in bands 1-3, 1.9" in band 4
CoordinateSystem ICRS
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch2004-02-08/2004-05-26
Reference The IRAC observation characteristics are summarized in this analysis paper while the discussion of how the data are archived are found in data release documentation.

Spitzer IRAC GOODS 8.0 micron data, channel 4

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODSIRAC 4, GOODS IRAC 4, GOODS IRAC 8.0, GOODS: Spitzer IRAC 8.0

Description
Spitzer IRAC medium infrared observations taken in all four IRAC channels in both the north and south GOODS fields.

Provenance IRAC Goods Team, IRSA data center
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 3.75 THz
Bandpass 3.21-4.65 THz
Coverage GOODS North and South (approximately 0.01% of sky).
PixelScale0.5"
PixelUnitsDN/s
Resolution 1.7" in bands 1-3, 1.9" in band 4
CoordinateSystem ICRS
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch2004-02-08/2004-05-26
Reference The IRAC observation characteristics are summarized in this analysis paper while the discussion of how the data are archived are found in data release documentation.

Southern GOODS Field: VLT ISAAC Observations, H band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODS ISAAC H, GOODS: VLT ISAAC H

Description
As part of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), near-infrared imaging observations of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) were carried out in J, H, Ks bands, using the ISAAC instrument mounted at the Antu Unit Telescope of the VLT at ESO's Cerro Paranal Observatory, Chile.

These data were obtained as part of the ESO Large Programme 168.A-0485 (PI: C. Cesarsky). Data covering four ISAAC fields in J and Ks bands were also drawn from the ESO programmes 64.O-0643, 66.A-0572 and 68.A-0544 (PI: E.Giallongo), which were part of the previous data releases.

This data release covers 172.4, 159.6, and 173.1 arcmin2 of the GOODS/CDF-S region in J, H and Ks respectively. More than 50% of the images reach a 5-sigma depth for point sources of at least 25.2 mag (J), 24.7 mag (H and Ks) in the AB system ("median depth").

This final GOODS/ISAAC data release accumulates observational data which have been acquired in 12814 science integrations between October 1999 and January 2007 totaling 1.3 Msec integration time. [Above adapted from reference Web site.]

SkyView uses the mosaic files provided in this delivery. The Version 1.5 mosaic is used for the KS band.

Regime Infrared
Frequency 183 THz
Bandwidth 168-202 THz
Provenance Data downloaded from VLT archive
CopyrightData freely available
NSurvey 3
Resolution 0.3-0.6"
PixelSize0.15"
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
PixelUnitsADU/s
Epoch October 1999 to January 2007
Reference Paper and web site.

Southern GOODS Field: VLT ISAAC Observations, J band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODS ISAAC J, GOODS: VLT ISAAC J

Description
As part of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), near-infrared imaging observations of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) were carried out in J, H, Ks bands, using the ISAAC instrument mounted at the Antu Unit Telescope of the VLT at ESO's Cerro Paranal Observatory, Chile.

These data were obtained as part of the ESO Large Programme 168.A-0485 (PI: C. Cesarsky). Data covering four ISAAC fields in J and Ks bands were also drawn from the ESO programmes 64.O-0643, 66.A-0572 and 68.A-0544 (PI: E.Giallongo), which were part of the previous data releases.

This data release covers 172.4, 159.6, and 173.1 arcmin2 of the GOODS/CDF-S region in J, H and Ks respectively. More than 50% of the images reach a 5-sigma depth for point sources of at least 25.2 mag (J), 24.7 mag (H and Ks) in the AB system ("median depth").

This final GOODS/ISAAC data release accumulates observational data which have been acquired in 12814 science integrations between October 1999 and January 2007 totaling 1.3 Msec integration time. [Above adapted from reference Web site.]

SkyView uses the mosaic files provided in this delivery. The Version 1.5 mosaic is used for the KS band.

Regime Infrared
Frequency 245 THz
Bandwidth 225-270 THz
Provenance Data downloaded from VLT archive
CopyrightData freely available
NSurvey 3
Resolution 0.3-0.6"
PixelSize0.15"
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
PixelUnitsADU/s
Epoch October 1999 to January 2007
Reference Paper and web site.

Southern GOODS Field: VLT ISAAC Observations, KS band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODS ISAAC KS, GOODS: VLT ISAAC KS

Description
As part of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), near-infrared imaging observations of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) were carried out in J, H, Ks bands, using the ISAAC instrument mounted at the Antu Unit Telescope of the VLT at ESO's Cerro Paranal Observatory, Chile.

These data were obtained as part of the ESO Large Programme 168.A-0485 (PI: C. Cesarsky). Data covering four ISAAC fields in J and Ks bands were also drawn from the ESO programmes 64.O-0643, 66.A-0572 and 68.A-0544 (PI: E.Giallongo), which were part of the previous data releases.

This data release covers 172.4, 159.6, and 173.1 arcmin2 of the GOODS/CDF-S region in J, H and Ks respectively. More than 50% of the images reach a 5-sigma depth for point sources of at least 25.2 mag (J), 24.7 mag (H and Ks) in the AB system ("median depth").

This final GOODS/ISAAC data release accumulates observational data which have been acquired in 12814 science integrations between October 1999 and January 2007 totaling 1.3 Msec integration time. [Above adapted from reference Web site.]

SkyView uses the mosaic files provided in this delivery. The Version 1.5 mosaic is used for the KS band.

Regime Infrared
Frequency 137 THz
Bandwidth 125-150 THz
Provenance Data downloaded from VLT archive
CopyrightData freely available
NSurvey 3
Resolution 0.3-0.6"
PixelSize0.15"
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
PixelUnitsADU/s
Epoch October 1999 to January 2007
Reference Paper and web site.

Spitzer MIPS GOODS 24 Micron Data

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODSMIPS, GOODS MIPS, GOODS: Spitzer MIPS, GOODS: Spitzer MIPS 24

Description
Spitzer MIPS observations of the GOODS North and South fields in the 24 micron channel.

ProvenanceIRSA, GOODS team
Copyright Public domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 1
Frequency12.5 THz (24 microns)
Bandpass 10.2-14.7 THz
Coverage GOODS regions, 0.01% of sky
PixelScale1.2"
PixelUnitsDN/s
Resolution5"
CoordinateSystemICRS
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 2004-5/2004-8
ReferenceSee release documentation for data.

GOODS NICMOS Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODSNICMOS, GNS, GOODS: HST NICMOS

Description
The GOODS NICMOS Survey (GNS) is a 180 orbit Hubble Space Telescope survey consisting of 60 pointings with the NICMOS-3 near-infrared camera. Each pointing is centred on a massive galaxy (M* > 1011 Msun) in the redshift range 1.7 < z < 3, selected by their optical-to-infrared colours (Papovich+06,Yan+04,Daddi+07) from the GOODS (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey) fields.

The positions of the 60 GNS pointings were optimised to contain as many massive galaxies as possible and are partly overlapping, covering a total area of about 45 arcmin2. The field of view of the NICMOS-3 camera is 51.2 ?? 51.2 arcsec with a resolution of about 0.1 arcsec/pixel. The PSF has a width of about 0.3 arcsec FWHM. The limiting magnitude in H band reached at 5?? is HAB = 26.8, about 2 magnitudes fainter than in available ground based data of the GOODS fields. [Taken from reference web site.]

ProvenanceUniversity of Nottingham, GNS group.
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 1
Frequency187 THz
Bandpass167-214 THz
Coverage About 10% of the GOODS fields or about 3 x 10-7 of the sky
Resolution 0.3"
PixelScale 0.1"
CoordinateSystemJ2000
ProjectionGnomonic
Epoch2007-02-14/2008-04-27
Reference Web site and reference paper

The Hawaii Hubble Deep Field North: Band I

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Hawaii HDF I, Hawaii: HDF I

Description
The Hawaii-HDF-N is an intensive multi-color imaging survey of 0.2 sq. degrees centered on the HDF-N. Data were collected on the NOAO 4m Mayall telescope, the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan 8.2m Subaru telescope and the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope. Deep U, B, V, R, I, and z' data were obtained over the whole field and deep HK' data over the Chandra Deep Field North. Details are available in the references. [Adapted from reference web site.]

Two different images are given in the V band (V0201 and V0401) from observations separated by about a month that had substantial differences in seeing.

Provenance Data downloaded from the reference web site. A formatting error in the FITS files was corrected.
Copyright Public Domain. Users are requested to include a reference to Capak, et al. 2004 when using these data.
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 8
Frequency375 THz
Bandpass358-395 THz
Coverage0.000005
Resolution 0.67-1.26"
PixelScale0.3"
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
Epoch1999/2002
Reference 2004AJ....127..180C or the web site.

The Hawaii Hubble Deep Field North: Band Z

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Hawaii HDF Z, Hawaii: HDF Z

Description
The Hawaii-HDF-N is an intensive multi-color imaging survey of 0.2 sq. degrees centered on the HDF-N. Data were collected on the NOAO 4m Mayall telescope, the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan 8.2m Subaru telescope and the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope. Deep U, B, V, R, I, and z' data were obtained over the whole field and deep HK' data over the Chandra Deep Field North. Details are available in the references. [Adapted from reference web site.]

Two different images are given in the V band (V0201 and V0401) from observations separated by about a month that had substantial differences in seeing.

Provenance Data downloaded from the reference web site. A formatting error in the FITS files was corrected.
Copyright Public Domain. Users are requested to include a reference to Capak, et al. 2004 when using these data.
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 8
Frequency330 THz
Bandpass317-345 THz
Coverage0.000005
Resolution 0.67-1.26"
PixelScale0.3"
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
Epoch1999/2002
Reference 2004AJ....127..180C or the web site.

VLT ISAAC Ks Observations of the Southern Hubble Ultradeep Field

Short name[s] used to specify survey:HUDFISAAC, HUDF: VLT ISAAC Ks

Description
A very deep Ks observation of the Hubble Ultradeep Field. This observation is approximately 0.6 magnitudes deeper than the GOODS ISAAC Ks image but covers only small fraction of the area.

Regime Infrared
Frequency 137 THz
Bandwidth 125-150 THz
Provenance Data downloaded from VLT archive
CopyrightData freely available
NSurvey 1
Resolution 0.3-0.6"
PixelSize0.15"
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
PixelUnitsADU/s
Reference Paper and Web site

IRAS Sky Survey Atlas: 100 micron

Short name[s] used to specify survey: IRAS100, IRAS 100 micron, IRAS 100, IRAS 100

Description
The IRAS data include all data distributed as part of the IRAS Sky Survey Atlas. Data from the four IRAS bands are shown as individual surveys in SkyView. Users should be aware that IPAC does not encourage the use of data near the ecliptic plane as they feel that contribution from local cirrus emission is significant.

The data are distributed in sets of 430 maps. Each map covers approximately 12.5x12.5 degrees, and the map centers are offset by 5 degrees so that there is a 2.5 degree overlap. IPAC has processed to a uniform standard so that excellent mosaics of the maps can be made. Users should be cautious of data in saturated regions. Known problems in the analysis mean that data values are unlikely to be correct. Note that IPAC has optimized the processing of these data for features of 5' or more although the resolution of the data is closer to the 1.5' pixel size.

There are occasional pixels in the IRAS maps which are given as NULL values. Unless these are explicitly trapped by user software, these data will appear as large negative values. SkyView ignores these pixels when determining the color scale to display an image.

Essentially the entire sky is covered by the survey. However there are a few regions not surveyed and the data values in these regions are suspect. These are given to users as delivered from IPAC.

Provenance NASA IPAC/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 3 THz
Bandpass 2.5-3.6 THz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.025 deg/pix
Units MJy/sr
Resolution 2'
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic(TAN)
Equinox 1950
Epoch 1983
Reference Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Explanatory Supplement

IRAS Sky Survey Atlas: 12 micron

Short name[s] used to specify survey: IRAS12, IRAS 12 micron, IRAS 12, IRAS 12

Description
The IRAS data include all data distributed as part of the IRAS Sky Survey Atlas. Data from the four IRAS bands are shown as individual surveys in SkyView. Users should be aware that IPAC does not encourage the use of data near the ecliptic plane as they feel that contribution from local cirrus emission is significant.

The data are distributed in sets of 430 maps. Each map covers approximately 12.5x12.5 degrees, and the map centers are offset by 5 degrees so that there is a 2.5 degree overlap. IPAC has processed to a uniform standard so that excellent mosaics of the maps can be made. Users should be cautious of data in saturated regions. Known problems in the analysis mean that data values are unlikely to be correct. Note that IPAC has optimized the processing of these data for features of 5' or more although the resolution of the data is closer to the 1.5' pixel size.

There are occasional pixels in the IRAS maps which are given as NULL values. Unless these are explicitly trapped by user software, these data will appear as large negative values. SkyView ignores these pixels when determining the color scale to display an image.

Essentially the entire sky is covered by the survey. However there are a few regions not surveyed and the data values in these regions are suspect. These are given to users as delivered from IPAC.

Provenance NASA IPAC/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 25 THz
Bandpass 20-35 THz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.025 deg/pix
Units MJy/sr
Resolution 2'
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic(TAN)
Equinox 1950
Epoch 1983
Reference Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Explanatory Supplement

IRAS Sky Survey Atlas: 25 micron

Short name[s] used to specify survey: IRAS25, IRAS 25 micron, IRAS 25, IRAS 25

Description
The IRAS data include all data distributed as part of the IRAS Sky Survey Atlas. Data from the four IRAS bands are shown as individual surveys in SkyView. Users should be aware that IPAC does not encourage the use of data near the ecliptic plane as they feel that contribution from local cirrus emission is significant.

The data are distributed in sets of 430 maps. Each map covers approximately 12.5x12.5 degrees, and the map centers are offset by 5 degrees so that there is a 2.5 degree overlap. IPAC has processed to a uniform standard so that excellent mosaics of the maps can be made. Users should be cautious of data in saturated regions. Known problems in the analysis mean that data values are unlikely to be correct. Note that IPAC has optimized the processing of these data for features of 5' or more although the resolution of the data is closer to the 1.5' pixel size.

There are occasional pixels in the IRAS maps which are given as NULL values. Unless these are explicitly trapped by user software, these data will appear as large negative values. SkyView ignores these pixels when determining the color scale to display an image.

Essentially the entire sky is covered by the survey. However there are a few regions not surveyed and the data values in these regions are suspect. These are given to users as delivered from IPAC.

Provenance NASA IPAC/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 12 THz
Bandpass 10-15.8 THz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.025 deg/pix
Units MJy/sr
Resolution 2'
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic(TAN)
Equinox 1950
Epoch 1983
Reference Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Explanatory Supplement

IRAS Sky Survey Atlas: 60 micron

Short name[s] used to specify survey: IRAS60, IRAS 60 micron, IRAS 60, IRAS 60

Description
The IRAS data include all data distributed as part of the IRAS Sky Survey Atlas. Data from the four IRAS bands are shown as individual surveys in SkyView. Users should be aware that IPAC does not encourage the use of data near the ecliptic plane as they feel that contribution from local cirrus emission is significant.

The data are distributed in sets of 430 maps. Each map covers approximately 12.5x12.5 degrees, and the map centers are offset by 5 degrees so that there is a 2.5 degree overlap. IPAC has processed to a uniform standard so that excellent mosaics of the maps can be made. Users should be cautious of data in saturated regions. Known problems in the analysis mean that data values are unlikely to be correct. Note that IPAC has optimized the processing of these data for features of 5' or more although the resolution of the data is closer to the 1.5' pixel size.

There are occasional pixels in the IRAS maps which are given as NULL values. Unless these are explicitly trapped by user software, these data will appear as large negative values. SkyView ignores these pixels when determining the color scale to display an image.

Essentially the entire sky is covered by the survey. However there are a few regions not surveyed and the data values in these regions are suspect. These are given to users as delivered from IPAC.

Provenance NASA IPAC/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 5 THz
Bandpass 3.75-6.5 THz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.025 deg/pix
Units MJy/sr
Resolution 2'
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic(TAN)
Equinox 1950
Epoch 1983
Reference Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Explanatory Supplement

Improved Reprocessing of the IRAS Survey: 100

Short name[s] used to specify survey: IRIS100, IRIS 100 micron,IRIS 100, IRIS 100

Description
The IRIS data is a reprocessing of the IRAS data set and has the same geometry as the IRAS Sky Survey Atlas (ISSA, labeled as IRAS nnn micron in SkyView) surveys. This new generation of IRAS images, called IRIS, benefits from a better zodiacal light subtraction, from a calibration and zero level compatible with DIRBE, and from a better destriping. At 100 micron the IRIS product is also a significant improvement from the Schlegel et al. (1998) maps. IRIS keeps the full ISSA resolution, it includes well calibrated point sources and the diffuse emission calibration at scales smaller than 1 degree was corrected for the variation of the IRAS detector responsivity with scale and brightness. The uncertainty on the IRIS calibration and zero level are dominated by the uncertainty on the DIRBE calibration and on the accuracy of the zodiacal light model.

More information about the IRIS dataset is available at the IRIS Web site whence most of the preceding description came.

Provenance Original IRAS data: NASA/JPL IPAC,
IRIS Reprocessing: Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics/Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale
See the IRIS Web site.
Copyright Public
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 3 THz
Bandpass 2.5-3.6 THz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.025 deg/pix
Units MJy/sr
Resolution 2'
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic(TAN)
Equinox 1950
Epoch 1983
Reference M. Miville-Deschenes and G. Lagache, IRIS: A New Generation of IRAS Maps, Ap.J.Supplement 157, 302, 2005

Improved Reprocessing of the IRAS Survey: 12

Short name[s] used to specify survey: IRIS12, IRIS 12 micron,IRIS 12, IRIS 12

Description
The IRIS data is a reprocessing of the IRAS data set and has the same geometry as the IRAS Sky Survey Atlas (ISSA, labeled as IRAS nnn micron in SkyView) surveys. This new generation of IRAS images, called IRIS, benefits from a better zodiacal light subtraction, from a calibration and zero level compatible with DIRBE, and from a better destriping. At 100 micron the IRIS product is also a significant improvement from the Schlegel et al. (1998) maps. IRIS keeps the full ISSA resolution, it includes well calibrated point sources and the diffuse emission calibration at scales smaller than 1 degree was corrected for the variation of the IRAS detector responsivity with scale and brightness. The uncertainty on the IRIS calibration and zero level are dominated by the uncertainty on the DIRBE calibration and on the accuracy of the zodiacal light model.

More information about the IRIS dataset is available at the IRIS Web site whence most of the preceding description came.

Provenance Original IRAS data: NASA/JPL IPAC,
IRIS Reprocessing: Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics/Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale
See the IRIS Web site.
Copyright Public
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 25 THz
Bandpass 20-35 THz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.025 deg/pix
Units MJy/sr
Resolution 2'
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic(TAN)
Equinox 1950
Epoch 1983
Reference M. Miville-Deschenes and G. Lagache, IRIS: A New Generation of IRAS Maps, Ap.J.Supplement 157, 302, 2005

Improved Reprocessing of the IRAS Survey: 25

Short name[s] used to specify survey: IRIS25, IRIS 25 micron,IRIS 25, IRIS 25

Description
The IRIS data is a reprocessing of the IRAS data set and has the same geometry as the IRAS Sky Survey Atlas (ISSA, labeled as IRAS nnn micron in SkyView) surveys. This new generation of IRAS images, called IRIS, benefits from a better zodiacal light subtraction, from a calibration and zero level compatible with DIRBE, and from a better destriping. At 100 micron the IRIS product is also a significant improvement from the Schlegel et al. (1998) maps. IRIS keeps the full ISSA resolution, it includes well calibrated point sources and the diffuse emission calibration at scales smaller than 1 degree was corrected for the variation of the IRAS detector responsivity with scale and brightness. The uncertainty on the IRIS calibration and zero level are dominated by the uncertainty on the DIRBE calibration and on the accuracy of the zodiacal light model.

More information about the IRIS dataset is available at the IRIS Web site whence most of the preceding description came.

Provenance Original IRAS data: NASA/JPL IPAC,
IRIS Reprocessing: Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics/Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale
See the IRIS Web site.
Copyright Public
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 12 THz
Bandpass 10-15.8 THz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.025 deg/pix
Units MJy/sr
Resolution 2'
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic(TAN)
Equinox 1950
Epoch 1983
Reference M. Miville-Deschenes and G. Lagache, IRIS: A New Generation of IRAS Maps, Ap.J.Supplement 157, 302, 2005

Improved Reprocessing of the IRAS Survey: 60

Short name[s] used to specify survey: IRIS60, IRIS 60 micron,IRIS 60, IRIS 60

Description
The IRIS data is a reprocessing of the IRAS data set and has the same geometry as the IRAS Sky Survey Atlas (ISSA, labeled as IRAS nnn micron in SkyView) surveys. This new generation of IRAS images, called IRIS, benefits from a better zodiacal light subtraction, from a calibration and zero level compatible with DIRBE, and from a better destriping. At 100 micron the IRIS product is also a significant improvement from the Schlegel et al. (1998) maps. IRIS keeps the full ISSA resolution, it includes well calibrated point sources and the diffuse emission calibration at scales smaller than 1 degree was corrected for the variation of the IRAS detector responsivity with scale and brightness. The uncertainty on the IRIS calibration and zero level are dominated by the uncertainty on the DIRBE calibration and on the accuracy of the zodiacal light model.

More information about the IRIS dataset is available at the IRIS Web site whence most of the preceding description came.

Provenance Original IRAS data: NASA/JPL IPAC,
IRIS Reprocessing: Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics/Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale
See the IRIS Web site.
Copyright Public
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 5 THz
Bandpass 3.75-6.5 THz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.025 deg/pix
Units MJy/sr
Resolution 2'
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic(TAN)
Equinox 1950
Epoch 1983
Reference M. Miville-Deschenes and G. Lagache, IRIS: A New Generation of IRAS Maps, Ap.J.Supplement 157, 302, 2005

Schlegel, Finkbeiner and Davis 100 Micron survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey: SFD100m,SFD 100m, SFD 100 Micron

Description
The full sky 100 micron map is a reprocessed composite of the COBE/DIRBE and IRAS/ISSA maps, with the zodiacal foreground and confirmed point sources removed. Artifacts from the IRAS scan pattern were removed. The result of these manipulations is a map with DIRBE-quality calibration and IR AS resolution.

Provenance David J. Schlegel, Douglas P. Finkbeiner and Marc Davis, Princeton University and University of California, Berkeley
Copyright Public domain
Regime Infrared
Frequency 3 THz
Bandpass 2.519 - 3.612 THz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.4'/pixel
PixelUnits MJy/sr MegaJanskies per steradian (100 micron map) and E(B-V) reddening (Dust map)
Resolution 6' full-width half-maximum
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Zenith Equal Area
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1983
Reference David J. Schlegel, Douglas P. Finkbeiner, & Marc Davis , 1998, Maps of Dust Infrared Emission for Use in Estimation of Reddening and Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Foregrounds (ADS). See also Dirbe/IRAS Dust Maps

Schlegel, Finkbeiner and Davis dust map survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey: SFDdust,SFD dust, SFD dust map

Description
The full sky 100 micron map is a reprocessed composite of the COBE/DIRBE and IRAS/ISSA maps, with the zodiacal foreground and confirmed point sources removed. Artifacts from the IRAS scan pattern were removed. The result of these manipulations is a map with DIRBE-quality calibration and IR AS resolution.

Provenance David J. Schlegel, Douglas P. Finkbeiner and Marc Davis, Princeton University and University of California, Berkeley
Copyright Public domain
Regime Infrared
Frequency 3 THz
Bandpass 2.519 - 3.612 THz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.4'/pixel
PixelUnits E(B-V) MegaJanskies per steradian (100 micron map) and E(B-V) reddening (Dust map)
Resolution 6' full-width half-maximum
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Zenith Equal Area
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1983
Reference David J. Schlegel, Douglas P. Finkbeiner, & Marc Davis , 1998, Maps of Dust Infrared Emission for Use in Estimation of Reddening and Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Foregrounds (ADS). See also Dirbe/IRAS Dust Maps

UKIRT Infrared Deep Survey H-band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:UKIDSS-H,UKIDSSH,UKIDSS H

Description
The UKIDSS survey is the next generation infrared survey, a successor to 2MASS. It will ultimately cover 7000 square degrees in the northern sky at both high and low Galactic latitudes and goes about three magnitudes deeper than 2MASS in the coverage area. Most data is taken in the J, H and K bands. A Y band is available in some regions.

UKIDSS is comprised of several distinct surveys in different regions of the sky. Of primary interest to SkyView users (since they have the largest sky coverage) are the Large Area Survey, the Galactic Plane Survey, and the Galactic Clusters Survey. There are deep and ultadeep surveys which cover much smaller fractions of the sky. The planned coverage for the UKIDSS surveys may be seen at the UKIDSS survey page. All UKIDSS data products are published by the Wide-Field Astronomy Unit (WFAU) at the University of Edinburgh through the WFCAM Science Archive (WSA) which includes more detailed coverage information for each data release.

SkyView currently uses the DR8 data release except for the Galactic Plane Survey region where the DR7 is the latest public release. Many thanks to the WSA team at WFAU for providing an interface to make all the latest data easily accessed. Note that coverage is not uniform across the different bands so that at a given point there might be H and K band data, but nothing in the J band.

ProvenanceUKIDSS Project
Copyright The UKIDSS team requests that text similar to the following be included when UKIDSS data is used:
The UKIDSS project is defined in Lawrence et al (2007). UKIDSS uses the UKIRT Wide Field Camera (WFCAM; Hewett et al (2006), and the calibration is described in Hodgkin et al. (2009). The pipeline processing and science archive are described in Irwin et al (2009, in prep) and Hambly et al (2008).
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 184 THz
Bandpass 168-201 THz
Coverage 0.17 (7000 square degrees
PixelScale 0.4"
PixelUnits
Resolution 1"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Zenithal Polynomial
Epoch 2005-2012
Reference See the UKIDSS web site or Lawrence et al (2007).

UKIRT Infrared Deep Survey J-band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:UKIDSS-J,UKIDSSJ,UKIDSS J

Description
The UKIDSS survey is the next generation infrared survey, a successor to 2MASS. It will ultimately cover 7000 square degrees in the northern sky at both high and low Galactic latitudes and goes about three magnitudes deeper than 2MASS in the coverage area. Most data is taken in the J, H and K bands. A Y band is available in some regions.

UKIDSS is comprised of several distinct surveys in different regions of the sky. Of primary interest to SkyView users (since they have the largest sky coverage) are the Large Area Survey, the Galactic Plane Survey, and the Galactic Clusters Survey. There are deep and ultadeep surveys which cover much smaller fractions of the sky. The planned coverage for the UKIDSS surveys may be seen at the UKIDSS survey page. All UKIDSS data products are published by the Wide-Field Astronomy Unit (WFAU) at the University of Edinburgh through the WFCAM Science Archive (WSA) which includes more detailed coverage information for each data release.

SkyView currently uses the DR8 data release except for the Galactic Plane Survey region where the DR7 is the latest public release. Many thanks to the WSA team at WFAU for providing an interface to make all the latest data easily accessed. Note that coverage is not uniform across the different bands so that at a given point there might be H and K band data, but nothing in the J band.

ProvenanceUKIDSS Project
Copyright The UKIDSS team requests that text similar to the following be included when UKIDSS data is used:
The UKIDSS project is defined in Lawrence et al (2007). UKIDSS uses the UKIRT Wide Field Camera (WFCAM; Hewett et al (2006), and the calibration is described in Hodgkin et al. (2009). The pipeline processing and science archive are described in Irwin et al (2009, in prep) and Hambly et al (2008).
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 240 THz
Bandpass 225-260 THz
Coverage 0.17 (7000 square degrees
PixelScale 0.4"
PixelUnits
Resolution 1"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Zenithal Polynomial
Epoch 2005-2012
Reference See the UKIDSS web site or Lawrence et al (2007).

UKIRT Infrared Deep Survey K-band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:UKIDSS-K,UKIDSSK,UKIDSS K

Description
The UKIDSS survey is the next generation infrared survey, a successor to 2MASS. It will ultimately cover 7000 square degrees in the northern sky at both high and low Galactic latitudes and goes about three magnitudes deeper than 2MASS in the coverage area. Most data is taken in the J, H and K bands. A Y band is available in some regions.

UKIDSS is comprised of several distinct surveys in different regions of the sky. Of primary interest to SkyView users (since they have the largest sky coverage) are the Large Area Survey, the Galactic Plane Survey, and the Galactic Clusters Survey. There are deep and ultadeep surveys which cover much smaller fractions of the sky. The planned coverage for the UKIDSS surveys may be seen at the UKIDSS survey page. All UKIDSS data products are published by the Wide-Field Astronomy Unit (WFAU) at the University of Edinburgh through the WFCAM Science Archive (WSA) which includes more detailed coverage information for each data release.

SkyView currently uses the DR8 data release except for the Galactic Plane Survey region where the DR7 is the latest public release. Many thanks to the WSA team at WFAU for providing an interface to make all the latest data easily accessed. Note that coverage is not uniform across the different bands so that at a given point there might be H and K band data, but nothing in the J band.

ProvenanceUKIDSS Project
Copyright The UKIDSS team requests that text similar to the following be included when UKIDSS data is used:
The UKIDSS project is defined in Lawrence et al (2007). UKIDSS uses the UKIRT Wide Field Camera (WFCAM; Hewett et al (2006), and the calibration is described in Hodgkin et al. (2009). The pipeline processing and science archive are described in Irwin et al (2009, in prep) and Hambly et al (2008).
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 136 THz
Bandpass 126-148 THz
Coverage 0.17 (7000 square degrees
PixelScale 0.4"
PixelUnits
Resolution 1"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Zenithal Polynomial
Epoch 2005-2012
Reference See the UKIDSS web site or Lawrence et al (2007).

UKIRT Infrared Deep Survey Y-band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:UKIDSS-Y,UKIDSSY,UKIDSS Y

Description
The UKIDSS survey is the next generation infrared survey, a successor to 2MASS. It will ultimately cover 7000 square degrees in the northern sky at both high and low Galactic latitudes and goes about three magnitudes deeper than 2MASS in the coverage area. Most data is taken in the J, H and K bands. A Y band is available in some regions.

UKIDSS is comprised of several distinct surveys in different regions of the sky. Of primary interest to SkyView users (since they have the largest sky coverage) are the Large Area Survey, the Galactic Plane Survey, and the Galactic Clusters Survey. There are deep and ultadeep surveys which cover much smaller fractions of the sky. The planned coverage for the UKIDSS surveys may be seen at the UKIDSS survey page. All UKIDSS data products are published by the Wide-Field Astronomy Unit (WFAU) at the University of Edinburgh through the WFCAM Science Archive (WSA) which includes more detailed coverage information for each data release.

SkyView currently uses the DR8 data release except for the Galactic Plane Survey region where the DR7 is the latest public release. Many thanks to the WSA team at WFAU for providing an interface to make all the latest data easily accessed. Note that coverage is not uniform across the different bands so that at a given point there might be H and K band data, but nothing in the J band.

ProvenanceUKIDSS Project
Copyright The UKIDSS team requests that text similar to the following be included when UKIDSS data is used:
The UKIDSS project is defined in Lawrence et al (2007). UKIDSS uses the UKIRT Wide Field Camera (WFCAM; Hewett et al (2006), and the calibration is described in Hodgkin et al. (2009). The pipeline processing and science archive are described in Irwin et al (2009, in prep) and Hambly et al (2008).
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 290 THz
Bandpass 280-310 THz
Coverage 0.17 (7000 square degrees
PixelScale 0.4"
PixelUnits
Resolution 1"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Zenithal Polynomial
Epoch 2005-2012
Reference See the UKIDSS web site or Lawrence et al (2007).

WISE 3.4 Micron All-Sky Survey>: All-WISE data release

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Wise W1,Wise 3.4, WiseW1, Wise3.4

Description
From the WISE mission site:.
NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 micrometers in 2010 with an angular resolution of 6.1", 6.4", 6.5" and 12.0" in the four bands. WISE achieved a 5 sigma point source sensitivities better and 0.08, 0.11 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in the four bands. Sensitivity improves toward the ecliptic poles due to denser coverage and lower zodaical background.

The WISE All-WISE includes all data taking during the WISE full cryogenic phase, from January 7, 2010 to August 6, 2010, that were processed with improved calibrations and reduction algorithms and combines this with the NEOWISE postcryogenic survey to form the most comprehensive view of the full mid-infrared sky. bibcode=1995ApJ...451..564V,2010ApJ...713..912W


SkyView includes the four WISE bands as separate surveys. Many non-image data products are available at the WISE site. Note that WISE data is distributed in relatively large (>50 MB) image files. When SkyView generates an image for a part of the sky where it has not yet cached the data from the IPAC server there may be a delay as full tiles are downloaded even when only a small fraction of a tile is needed. Images in cached regions, are generated much faster. Access to the WISE data uses the VO SIA interface maintained at IPAC. Even when data is cached, the SIA service must still be available for successful queries.

ProvenanceWISE Archive (IRSA/IPAC)
Copyright WISE data is in the public domain but publications are requested to include the statment:
This publication makes use of data products from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, which is a joint project of the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 88 THz (3.4 micrometers)
Bandpass 78-107 THz
Coverage All sky
PixelScale 1.375"
PixelUnits DN
Resolution 6.1"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Sine
Epoch January 2010 to February 2011
Reference The main All-Sky survey is described in Wright et al (2010) The NEOWISE data is discussed in Mainzer et al.

WISE 4.6 Micron All-Sky Survey>: All-WISE data release

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Wise W2,Wise 4.6, WiseW2, Wise4.6

Description
From the WISE mission site:.
NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 micrometers in 2010 with an angular resolution of 6.1", 6.4", 6.5" and 12.0" in the four bands. WISE achieved a 5 sigma point source sensitivities better and 0.08, 0.11 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in the four bands. Sensitivity improves toward the ecliptic poles due to denser coverage and lower zodaical background.

The WISE All-WISE includes all data taking during the WISE full cryogenic phase, from January 7, 2010 to August 6, 2010, that were processed with improved calibrations and reduction algorithms and combines this with the NEOWISE postcryogenic survey to form the most comprehensive view of the full mid-infrared sky. bibcode=1995ApJ...451..564V,2010ApJ...713..912W


SkyView includes the four WISE bands as separate surveys. Many non-image data products are available at the WISE site. Note that WISE data is distributed in relatively large (>50 MB) image files. When SkyView generates an image for a part of the sky where it has not yet cached the data from the IPAC server there may be a delay as full tiles are downloaded even when only a small fraction of a tile is needed. Images in cached regions, are generated much faster. Access to the WISE data uses the VO SIA interface maintained at IPAC. Even when data is cached, the SIA service must still be available for successful queries.

ProvenanceWISE Archive (IRSA/IPAC)
Copyright WISE data is in the public domain but publications are requested to include the statment:
This publication makes use of data products from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, which is a joint project of the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 65 THz (4.6 micrometers)
Bandpass 58-74 THz
Coverage All sky
PixelScale 1.375"
PixelUnits DN
Resolution 6.4"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Sine
Epoch January 2010 to February 2011
Reference The main All-Sky survey is described in Wright et al (2010) The NEOWISE data is discussed in Mainzer et al.

WISE 12 Micron All-Sky Survey>: All-WISE data release

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Wise W3,Wise 12, WiseW3, Wise12

Description
From the WISE mission site:.
NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 micrometers in 2010 with an angular resolution of 6.1", 6.4", 6.5" and 12.0" in the four bands. WISE achieved a 5 sigma point source sensitivities better and 0.08, 0.11 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in the four bands. Sensitivity improves toward the ecliptic poles due to denser coverage and lower zodaical background.

The WISE All-WISE includes all data taking during the WISE full cryogenic phase, from January 7, 2010 to August 6, 2010, that were processed with improved calibrations and reduction algorithms and combines this with the NEOWISE postcryogenic survey to form the most comprehensive view of the full mid-infrared sky. bibcode=1995ApJ...451..564V,2010ApJ...713..912W


SkyView includes the four WISE bands as separate surveys. Many non-image data products are available at the WISE site. Note that WISE data is distributed in relatively large (>50 MB) image files. When SkyView generates an image for a part of the sky where it has not yet cached the data from the IPAC server there may be a delay as full tiles are downloaded even when only a small fraction of a tile is needed. Images in cached regions, are generated much faster. Access to the WISE data uses the VO SIA interface maintained at IPAC. Even when data is cached, the SIA service must still be available for successful queries.

ProvenanceWISE Archive (IRSA/IPAC)
Copyright WISE data is in the public domain but publications are requested to include the statment:
This publication makes use of data products from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, which is a joint project of the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 25 THz (12 micrometers)
Bandpass 18-40 THz
Coverage All sky
PixelScale 1.375"
PixelUnits DN
Resolution 6.5"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Sine
Epoch January 2010 to February 2011
Reference The main All-Sky survey is described in Wright et al (2010) The NEOWISE data is discussed in Mainzer et al.

WISE 22 Micron All-Sky Survey>: All-WISE data release

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Wise W4,Wise 22, WiseW4, Wise22

Description
From the WISE mission site:.
NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the sky at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 micrometers in 2010 with an angular resolution of 6.1", 6.4", 6.5" and 12.0" in the four bands. WISE achieved a 5 sigma point source sensitivities better and 0.08, 0.11 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in the four bands. Sensitivity improves toward the ecliptic poles due to denser coverage and lower zodaical background.

The WISE All-WISE includes all data taking during the WISE full cryogenic phase, from January 7, 2010 to August 6, 2010, that were processed with improved calibrations and reduction algorithms and combines this with the NEOWISE postcryogenic survey to form the most comprehensive view of the full mid-infrared sky. bibcode=1995ApJ...451..564V,2010ApJ...713..912W


SkyView includes the four WISE bands as separate surveys. Many non-image data products are available at the WISE site. Note that WISE data is distributed in relatively large (>50 MB) image files. When SkyView generates an image for a part of the sky where it has not yet cached the data from the IPAC server there may be a delay as full tiles are downloaded even when only a small fraction of a tile is needed. Images in cached regions, are generated much faster. Access to the WISE data uses the VO SIA interface maintained at IPAC. Even when data is cached, the SIA service must still be available for successful queries.

ProvenanceWISE Archive (IRSA/IPAC)
Copyright WISE data is in the public domain but publications are requested to include the statment:
This publication makes use of data products from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, which is a joint project of the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 4
Frequency 14 THz (22 micrometers)
Bandpass 12-15 THz
Coverage All sky
PixelScale 1.375"
PixelUnits DN
Resolution 12"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Sine
Epoch January 2010 to February 2011
Reference The main All-Sky survey is described in Wright et al (2010) The NEOWISE data is discussed in Mainzer et al.

WMAP Nine Year K-Band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:WMAPK,WMAP K,WMAP-K

Description
These data represent the 9 year co-added maps for each of the five frequency bands in the WMAP dataset. The original data are available at the LAMBDA archive.

The original data are stored in HEALPix pixels. SkyView treats HEALPix as a standard projection but assumes that the HEALPix data is in a projection plane with a rotation of -45 degrees. The rotation transforms the HEALPix pixels from diamonds to squares so that the boundaries of the pixels are treated properly. The special HealPixImage class is used so that SkyView can use the HEALPix FITS files directly. The HealPixImage simulates a rectangular image but translates the pixels from that image to the nested HEALPix structure that is used by the WMAP data.

Provenance WMAP Mission/LAMBDA archive
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 1
Frequency 23 GHz
Bandpass 19-25 GHz
Coverage AllSky
PixelScale 7.5'
PixelUnits millikelvins
Resolution 0.91 degrees
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection HEALPix
Epoch 2000-2009
Reference LAMBDA archive or Nine year results

WMAP Nine Year Ka-Band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:WMAPKa,WMAP Ka,WMAP-Ka

Description
These data represent the 9 year co-added maps for each of the five frequency bands in the WMAP dataset. The original data are available at the LAMBDA archive.

The original data are stored in HEALPix pixels. SkyView treats HEALPix as a standard projection but assumes that the HEALPix data is in a projection plane with a rotation of -45 degrees. The rotation transforms the HEALPix pixels from diamonds to squares so that the boundaries of the pixels are treated properly. The special HealPixImage class is used so that SkyView can use the HEALPix FITS files directly. The HealPixImage simulates a rectangular image but translates the pixels from that image to the nested HEALPix structure that is used by the WMAP data.

Provenance WMAP Mission/LAMBDA archive
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 1
Frequency 33 GHz
Bandpass 29-37 GHz
Coverage AllSky
PixelScale 7.5'
PixelUnits millikelvins
Resolution 0.69 degrees
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection HEALPix
Epoch 2000-2009
Reference LAMBDA archive or Nine year results

WMAP Nine Year Q-Band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:WMAPQ,WMAP Q,WMAP-Q

Description
These data represent the 9 year co-added maps for each of the five frequency bands in the WMAP dataset. The original data are available at the LAMBDA archive.

The original data are stored in HEALPix pixels. SkyView treats HEALPix as a standard projection but assumes that the HEALPix data is in a projection plane with a rotation of -45 degrees. The rotation transforms the HEALPix pixels from diamonds to squares so that the boundaries of the pixels are treated properly. The special HealPixImage class is used so that SkyView can use the HEALPix FITS files directly. The HealPixImage simulates a rectangular image but translates the pixels from that image to the nested HEALPix structure that is used by the WMAP data.

Provenance WMAP Mission/LAMBDA archive
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 1
Frequency 40 GHz
Bandpass 35-45 GHz
Coverage AllSky
PixelScale 7.5'
PixelUnits millikelvins
Resolution 0.54 degrees
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection HEALPix
Epoch 2000-2009
Reference LAMBDA archive or Nine year results

WMAP Nine Year V-Band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:WMAPV,WMAP V,WMAP-V

Description
These data represent the 9 year co-added maps for each of the five frequency bands in the WMAP dataset. The original data are available at the LAMBDA archive.

The original data are stored in HEALPix pixels. SkyView treats HEALPix as a standard projection but assumes that the HEALPix data is in a projection plane with a rotation of -45 degrees. The rotation transforms the HEALPix pixels from diamonds to squares so that the boundaries of the pixels are treated properly. The special HealPixImage class is used so that SkyView can use the HEALPix FITS files directly. The HealPixImage simulates a rectangular image but translates the pixels from that image to the nested HEALPix structure that is used by the WMAP data.

Provenance WMAP Mission/LAMBDA archive
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 1
Frequency 61 GHz
Bandpass 54-68 GHz
Coverage AllSky
PixelScale 7.5'
PixelUnits millikelvins
Resolution 0.37 degrees
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection HEALPix
Epoch 2000-2009
Reference LAMBDA archive or Nine year results

WMAP Nine Year W-Band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:WMAPW,WMAP W,WMAP-W

Description
These data represent the 9 year co-added maps for each of the five frequency bands in the WMAP dataset. The original data are available at the LAMBDA archive.

The original data are stored in HEALPix pixels. SkyView treats HEALPix as a standard projection but assumes that the HEALPix data is in a projection plane with a rotation of -45 degrees. The rotation transforms the HEALPix pixels from diamonds to squares so that the boundaries of the pixels are treated properly. The special HealPixImage class is used so that SkyView can use the HEALPix FITS files directly. The HealPixImage simulates a rectangular image but translates the pixels from that image to the nested HEALPix structure that is used by the WMAP data.

Provenance WMAP Mission/LAMBDA archive
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 1
Frequency 94 GHz
Bandpass 84-104 GHz
Coverage AllSky
PixelScale 7.5'
PixelUnits millikelvins
Resolution 0.26 degrees
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection HEALPix
Epoch 2000-2009
Reference LAMBDA archive or Nine year results

WMAP Nine Year Galaxy Removed

Short name[s] used to specify survey:WMAPILC,WMAP ILC,WMAP

Description
These survey represents a combination of the 9-year data combined in a way that is intended to minimize the contribution from the galaxy. The data measure the temperature deviation from a uniform black body.

The original data are available at the LAMBDA archive.

The original data are stored in HEALPix pixels. SkyView treats HEALPix as a standard projection but assumes that the HEALPix data is in a projection plane with a rotation of -45 degrees. The rotation transforms the HEALPix pixels from diamonds to squares so that the boundaries of the pixels are treated properly. The special HealPixImage class is used so that SkyView can use the HEALPix FITS files directly. The HealPixImage simulates a rectangular image but translates the pixels from that image to the nested HEALPix structure that is used by the WMAP data.

Provenance WMAP Mission/LAMBDA archive
Copyright Public Domain
Regime Infrared
NSurvey 1
Frequency 23-200 GHz
Coverage AllSky
PixelScale 7.5'
PixelUnits millikelvins
Resolution 0.88 degree beam size
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection HEALPix
Epoch 2000-2009
Reference LAMBDA archive or Seven year results

Optical surveys

Original Digitized Sky Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:DSSOld,Digitized Sky Survey,DSS

Description
This survey comprises the compressed digitization of the Southern Sky Survey and the Palomar Sky Survey E plates as distributed on CD ROM by the Space Telescope Science Institute. Coverage of the entire sky is included. This survey consists of the digititized Southern Sky Survey conducted at the UK Southern Schmidt Survey Group by the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (prior to 1988) and the Anglo-Australian Observatory (since 1988) Additional plates covering regions with bright objects are also included. The plates were digitized at the Space Telescope Science Institute and compressed using algorithms developed by R.White. These data are distributed on a set of 101 CD-ROMs.

The following data are included:

Southern hemisphere
SERC Southern Sky Survey and the SERC J Equatorial extension. These are typically deep, 3600s, IIIa-J exposures with a GG395 filter. Also included are 94 short (1200s) V exposures typically at Galactic latitudes below 15°. Special exposures are included in the regions of the Magellenic clouds.
Northern hemisphere
The northern hemisphere is covered by 644 plates from the POSS E survey. A special exposure of the M31 region that is distributed on the CD ROMs is not used in SkyView .

Provenance Data taken by ROE and AAO, CalTech, Compression and distribution by Space Telescope Science Institute.
Copyright STScI, ROE, AAO, UK-PPARC, CalTech, National Geographic Society.
Full copyright notice
Regime Optical
NSurvey 1
Frequency 560 THz (Different plates have different bands: J or E with a few exceptions)
Bandpass 422-965 THz (individual plates have smaller bandpass)
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 1.7"
Units Scaled densities
Resolution Depends on plate. Typically 2"
CoordinatesEquatorial
Projection Schmidt (distorted Tangent plane projection)
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1945-1958 north, 1980-1999 south
Reference Lasker, et al., 1990, A.J. 99
Characteristics of the DSS surveys are summarized in this document.

First Digitized Sky Survey: Blue Plates

Short name[s] used to specify survey: DSS1B,DSS1 Blue

Description
This survey uses the POSS1 Blue plates.

Provenance Data taken by CalTech, Compression and distribution by Space Telescope Science Institute.
Copyright STScI, CalTech, National Geographic Society.
Full copyright notice
Regime Optical
NSurvey 1
Frequency 638 THz
Bandpass 517-967 THz
Coverage North of -30 degrees declination
PixelScale 1.7"
Units Scaled densities
Resolution Depends on plate. Typically 2"
CoordinatesEquatorial
Projection Schmidt (distorted Tangent plane projection)
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1975-1988
Reference Lasker, et al., 1990, A.J. 99

First Digitized Sky Survey: Red Plates

Short name[s] used to specify survey:DSS1R,DSS1 Red

Description
This survey is the POSS1 Red plates from the original POSS survey. It covers the sky north of -30 degrees declination.

Provenance Data taken by CalTech Compression and distribution by Space Telescope Science Institute.
Copyright CalTech, National Geographic Society.
Full copyright notice
Regime Optical
NSurvey 1
Frequency 461 THz
Bandpass 437-491 THz
Coverage North of -30 degrees declination
PixelScale 1.7"
Units Scaled densities
Resolution Depends on plate. Typically 2"
CoordinatesEquatorial
Projection Schmidt (distorted Tangent plane projection)
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1945-1958
Reference Lasker, et al., 1990, A.J. 99
Characteristics of the DSS surveys are summarized in this document.

2nd Digitized Sky Survey (Blue)

Short name[s] used to specify survey:DSS2B, DSS2 Blue

Description

The native projection of these data is described as a high-order polynomial distortion of a gnomonic projection using the same terms as the DSS.

.
Provenance Data taken by ROE, AAO, and CalTech, Compression and distribution by Space Telescope Science Institute.
Copyright There are multiple copyright holders depending upon the source plate or plates. See full copyright notices The coverage link below describes the coverage for each element of the surveys when the original plate used is not included in the SkyView files.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 1
Frequency 637 THz
Bandpass 517-967 THz
Coverage All-sky, but some data not yet be processed.
PixelScale 1" in the north 1.7" in the south
PixelUnits Pixel values are given as scaled densities
Resolution Depends on plate. Typically better than 2".
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Schmidt
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1950-1998
Reference Some information on the DSS2 is given in McLean, 2000, The Second Generation Guide Star Catalog.
Characteristics of the DSS surveys are summarized in this document.

2nd Digitized Sky Survey (Red)

Short name[s] used to specify survey:DSS2R, DSS2 Red

Description
This survey comprises the POSS2 Red data from the north and rescanned 1" scans of UKSTU red data in the south.

The native projection of these data is described as a high-order polynomial distortion of a gnomonic projection using the same terms as the DSS.

.
Provenance Data taken by ROE, AAO, and CalTech, Compression and distribution by Space Telescope Science Institute.
Copyright There are multiple copyright holders depending upon the source plate or plates. See full copyright notices The coverage link below describes the coverage for each element of the surveys when the original plate used is not included in the SkyView files.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 1
Frequency 445 THz
Bandpass 422-564 THz
Coverage All-sky, but some data not yet be processed.
PixelScale 1"
PixelUnits Pixel values are given as scaled densities
Resolution Depends on plate. Typically 3".
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Schmidt
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1984-1999
Reference Some information on the DSS2 is given in McLean, 2000, The Second Generation Guide Star Catalog.
Characteristics of the DSS surveys are summarized in this document.

GOODS HST ACS B Filter

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODS ACS B,GOODS: HST ACS B,GOODS_ACS_B

Description
This is a SkyView rendering of the HST ACS data as described in the release document. This comprises four bands of observations of each both the north and south GOODS regions.

These data are stored in SkyView as a hierarchical image with 7 levels of pixels, each with a factor of 2 change in scale. Thus the coarsest sampling using pixels 64 times larger than the finest. As we go to coarser pixels, 4 adjacent pixels forming a square are averaged to create the pixel in the next level. The coarsest pixel scale that is at least the resolution requested is used.

The exposure times are given as: 7200
GOODS ACS exposure (s)
BandNorth>South
z8502476018232
i77585307028
V60656505450
B435
7200

Provenance Created by the GOODS team and distributed by MAST
CopyrightPublic domain
RegimeOptical
NSurvey4
Frequency 6.93 x 1014
Bandpass 6.70-7.17 x 1014
Coverage GOODS regions (0.01% of sky)
PixelScale 0.03"
PixelUnits Counts (of electrons)
Resolution 0.1"
CoordinateSystem ICRS
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 2002-07-04/2005-04-14
Reference GOODS Version 2.0 HST ACS Imaging Data

GOODS HST ACS I Filter

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODS ACS I,GOODS: HST ACS I,GOODS_ACS_I

Description
This is a SkyView rendering of the HST ACS data as described in the release document. This comprises four bands of observations of each both the north and south GOODS regions.

These data are stored in SkyView as a hierarchical image with 7 levels of pixels, each with a factor of 2 change in scale. Thus the coarsest sampling using pixels 64 times larger than the finest. As we go to coarser pixels, 4 adjacent pixels forming a square are averaged to create the pixel in the next level. The coarsest pixel scale that is at least the resolution requested is used.

The exposure times are given as: 7200
GOODS ACS exposure (s)
BandNorth>South
z8502476018232
i77585307028
V60656505450
B435
7200

Provenance Created by the GOODS team and distributed by MAST
CopyrightPublic domain
RegimeOptical
NSurvey4
Frequency 3.90 x 1014
Bandpass 3.79-4.01 x 1014
Coverage GOODS regions (0.01% of sky)
PixelScale 0.03"
PixelUnits Counts (of electrons)
Resolution 0.1"
CoordinateSystem ICRS
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 2002-07-04/2005-04-14
Reference GOODS Version 2.0 HST ACS Imaging Data

GOODS HST ACS V Filter

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODS ACS V,GOODS: HST ACS V,GOODS_ACS_V

Description
This is a SkyView rendering of the HST ACS data as described in the release document. This comprises four bands of observations of each both the north and south GOODS regions.

These data are stored in SkyView as a hierarchical image with 7 levels of pixels, each with a factor of 2 change in scale. Thus the coarsest sampling using pixels 64 times larger than the finest. As we go to coarser pixels, 4 adjacent pixels forming a square are averaged to create the pixel in the next level. The coarsest pixel scale that is at least the resolution requested is used.

The exposure times are given as: 7200
GOODS ACS exposure (s)
BandNorth>South
z8502476018232
i77585307028
V60656505450
B435
7200

Provenance Created by the GOODS team and distributed by MAST
CopyrightPublic domain
RegimeOptical
NSurvey4
Frequency 5.06 x 1014
Bandpass 4.79-5.37 x 1014
Coverage GOODS regions (0.01% of sky)
PixelScale 0.03"
PixelUnits Counts (of electrons)
Resolution 0.1"
CoordinateSystem ICRS
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 2002-07-04/2005-04-14
Reference GOODS Version 2.0 HST ACS Imaging Data

GOODS HST ACS Z Filter

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODS ACS Z,GOODS: HST ACS Z,GOODS_ACS_Z

Description
This is a SkyView rendering of the HST ACS data as described in the release document. This comprises four bands of observations of each both the north and south GOODS regions.

These data are stored in SkyView as a hierarchical image with 7 levels of pixels, each with a factor of 2 change in scale. Thus the coarsest sampling using pixels 64 times larger than the finest. As we go to coarser pixels, 4 adjacent pixels forming a square are averaged to create the pixel in the next level. The coarsest pixel scale that is at least the resolution requested is used.

The exposure times are given as: 7200
GOODS ACS exposure (s)
BandNorth>South
z8502476018232
i77585307028
V60656505450
B435
7200

Provenance Created by the GOODS team and distributed by MAST
CopyrightPublic domain
RegimeOptical
NSurvey4
Frequency 3.32 x 1014
Bandpass 3.22-3.42 x 1014
Coverage GOODS regions (0.01% of sky)
PixelScale 0.03"
PixelUnits Counts (of electrons)
Resolution 0.1"
CoordinateSystem ICRS
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 2002-07-04/2005-04-14
Reference GOODS Version 2.0 HST ACS Imaging Data

Southern GOODS Field: VLT VIMOS Observations, R band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODS VIMOS R, GOODS: VLT VIMOS R

Description
As part of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), deep imaging in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) has been carried out, using the VIMOS instrument mounted at the Melipal Unit Telescope of the VLT at ESO's Cerro Paranal Observatory, Chile.

This data release contains the coadded images in U band from the ESO large programme 168.A-0485 (P.I. C. Cesarsky) which have been obtained in service mode observations between August 2004 and fall 2006. The 1-sigma depth for VIMOS U band in the area covered by the GOODS-ACS observations is ~30 AB (within an aperture of 1" radius, ranging from 29.5 and 30.2 AB). The PSF of the VIMOS U band mosaic is ~0.8" FWHM, but varies over the field.

Also included in this data release is a coadded image in R band obtained from data retrieved from the ESO archive. Due to the different observing strategies adopted in the programmes the resulting coverage of the GOODS-ACS area is more complex than for the U band. The depth of the VIMOS R band mosaic over the ACS area ranges from ~28 AB to 29 AB (1-sigma, 1" aperture radius). The PSF of the VIMOS R band mosaic is ~0".7 FWHM and varies over the field. [Adapted from reference web site.]

Regime Optical
Frequency 455 THz
Bandwidth 412-509 THz
Provenance Data downloaded from VLT archive
Copyright Data freely available from ESO archive. When using data products provided in this release, acknowledgement should be given in the text to the ESO/GOODS programme, referring to the publication Nonino et al. 2009. In addition, please also use the following statement in your articles when using these data: "Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla or Paranal Observatories under programme number 168.A-0485."
NSurvey 2
Resolution 0.7-0.8"
PixelSize0.2"
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
PixelUnitsADU/s
Epoch2004-8-11 to 2006-10-27
Reference Paper and web site.>

H-alpha Full Sky Map

Short name[s] used to specify survey:HAlpha,HALPHA/Comp,H-Alpha Comp,H-Alpha Composite,H-alpha

Description
The full-sky H-alpha map (6' FWHM resolution) is a composite of the Virginia Tech Spectral line Survey (VTSS) in the north and the Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas (SHASSA) in the south. Stellar artifacts and bleed trails have been carefully removed from these maps. The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) survey provides a stable zero-point over 3/4 of the sky on a one degree scale. This composite map can be used to provide limits on thermal bremsstrahlung (free-free emission) from ionized gas known to contaminate microwave-background data. The map (in Rayleighs; 1R=106/4pi photons/cm2/s/sr), an error map, and a bitmask are provided in 8640x4320 Cartesian projections as well as HEALPIX (Nside 256, 512, and 1024) projections on the H-Alpha Full-Sky Map web site.

CopyrightPublic domain
Regime Optical
Frequency 456.79 THz
Bandpass 456.2-457.38 THz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.5'
PixelUnits Rayleighs (R)
Resolution 6' FWHM
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox 2000
Projection Rectangular
Epoch 1997 to 2002
Reference "A Full-Sky H-alpha Template for Microwave Foreground Prediction" Douglas P. Finkbeiner 2003. This paper may be downloaded from ADS.

The Hawaii Hubble Deep Field North: Band B

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Hawaii HDF B, Hawaii: HDF B

Description
The Hawaii-HDF-N is an intensive multi-color imaging survey of 0.2 sq. degrees centered on the HDF-N. Data were collected on the NOAO 4m Mayall telescope, the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan 8.2m Subaru telescope and the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope. Deep U, B, V, R, I, and z' data were obtained over the whole field and deep HK' data over the Chandra Deep Field North. Details are available in the references. [Adapted from reference web site.]

Two different images are given in the V band (V0201 and V0401) from observations separated by about a month that had substantial differences in seeing.

Provenance Data downloaded from the reference web site. A formatting error in the FITS files was corrected.
Copyright Public Domain. Users are requested to include a reference to Capak, et al. 2004 when using these data.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 8
Frequency677 THz
Bandpass632-728 THz
Coverage0.000005
Resolution 0.67-1.26"
PixelScale0.3"
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
Epoch1999/2002
Reference 2004AJ....127..180C or the web site.

The Hawaii Hubble Deep Field North: Band R

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Hawaii HDF R, Hawaii: HDF R

Description
The Hawaii-HDF-N is an intensive multi-color imaging survey of 0.2 sq. degrees centered on the HDF-N. Data were collected on the NOAO 4m Mayall telescope, the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan 8.2m Subaru telescope and the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope. Deep U, B, V, R, I, and z' data were obtained over the whole field and deep HK' data over the Chandra Deep Field North. Details are available in the references. [Adapted from reference web site.]

Two different images are given in the V band (V0201 and V0401) from observations separated by about a month that had substantial differences in seeing.

Provenance Data downloaded from the reference web site. A formatting error in the FITS files was corrected.
Copyright Public Domain. Users are requested to include a reference to Capak, et al. 2004 when using these data.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 8
Frequency458 THz
Bandpass436-484 THz
Coverage0.000005
Resolution 0.67-1.26"
PixelScale0.3"
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
Epoch1999/2002
Reference 2004AJ....127..180C or the web site.

The Hawaii Hubble Deep Field North: Band V0201

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Hawaii HDF V0201, Hawaii: HDF V0201

Description
The Hawaii-HDF-N is an intensive multi-color imaging survey of 0.2 sq. degrees centered on the HDF-N. Data were collected on the NOAO 4m Mayall telescope, the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan 8.2m Subaru telescope and the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope. Deep U, B, V, R, I, and z' data were obtained over the whole field and deep HK' data over the Chandra Deep Field North. Details are available in the references. [Adapted from reference web site.]

Two different images are given in the V band (V0201 and V0401) from observations separated by about a month that had substantial differences in seeing.

Provenance Data downloaded from the reference web site. A formatting error in the FITS files was corrected.
Copyright Public Domain. Users are requested to include a reference to Capak, et al. 2004 when using these data.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 8
Frequency547 THz
Bandpass520-577 THz
Coverage0.000005
Resolution 0.67-1.26"
PixelScale0.3"
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
Epoch1999/2002
Reference 2004AJ....127..180C or the web site.

The Hawaii Hubble Deep Field North: Band V0401

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Hawaii HDF V0401, Hawaii: HDF V0401

Description
The Hawaii-HDF-N is an intensive multi-color imaging survey of 0.2 sq. degrees centered on the HDF-N. Data were collected on the NOAO 4m Mayall telescope, the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan 8.2m Subaru telescope and the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope. Deep U, B, V, R, I, and z' data were obtained over the whole field and deep HK' data over the Chandra Deep Field North. Details are available in the references. [Adapted from reference web site.]

Two different images are given in the V band (V0201 and V0401) from observations separated by about a month that had substantial differences in seeing.

Provenance Data downloaded from the reference web site. A formatting error in the FITS files was corrected.
Copyright Public Domain. Users are requested to include a reference to Capak, et al. 2004 when using these data.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 8
Frequency547 THz
Bandpass520-577 THz
Coverage0.000005
Resolution 0.67-1.26"
PixelScale0.3"
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
Epoch1999/2002
Reference 2004AJ....127..180C or the web site.

Mellinger All Sky Mosaic: Blue

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Mellinger-B,Mell-B,Mellinger Blue

Description
This all sky mosaic was created by Axel Mellinger and is used in SkyView with his permission. A fuller description is available at the survey web site.

Between October 2007 and August 2009 a digital all-sky mosaic was assembled from more than 3000 individual CCD frames. Using an SBIG STL-11000 camera, 70 fields (each covering 40x27 degrees) were imaged from dark-sky locations in South Africa, Texas and Michigan. In order to increase the dynamic range beyond the 16 bits of the camera's analog-to-digital converter (of which approximately 12 bits provide data above the noise leve) three different exposure times (240s, 15s and 0.5 s) were used. Five frames were taken for each exposure time and filter setting. The frames were photometrically calibrated using standard catalog stars and sky background data from the Pioneer 10 and 11 space probes. the panorama has an image scale of 36"/pixel and a limiting magnitude of approximately 14. The survey has an 18 bit dynamic range.

The processing of these data used a custom data pipeline built using IRAF, Source Extractor and SWarp.

The data used here were converted to three independent RGB color planes of 8 bits each and provided to SkyView as a single 36000x18000x3 Cartesian projection cube. To allow users to efficiently sample data in a region of the sky, this cube was broken up into 2100x2100 pixel regions with a 50 pixel overlap between adjacent images. Tiles at the poles were 2100x2050.

In SkyView each color plane comprises a survey. The individual planes may be sampled as surveys independently as Mellinger-R, Mellinger-G and Mellinger-B. The color mosaics can be regenerated by creating an RGB image of all three surveys. Since SkyView may stretch the intensity values within each color, linear scaling and a minimum of 0 and maximum of 255 should be specified to keep the original intensity scalings.

The full spatial resolution data is used for images of less than 30 degrees on a side. If a user requests a larger region, data are sampled from a lower resolution 3600x1800x3 data cube. Please contact the survey author if you need to use the higher resolution data for larger regions. The Mellinger survey is only available in SkyView through the Web site. SkyView-in-a-Jar cannot access the underlying data.

Provenance Axel Mellinger
Copyright Axel Mellinger. Permission is granted for use in research and personal, non-commercial use. Please contact Axel Mellinger for permission for other use. Survey web site
Regime Optical
NSurvey 3
Frequency 475 THz
Bandpass 446-535 THz
Coverage All-sky
PixelSize 0.01 deg/pix
Units Byte-scaled intensity
Resolution 0.02
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Cartesian
Equinox 2000
Epoch 2008-10 to 2009-04
Reference PASP 121, 1180, 2009
Survey web site.

Mellinger All Sky Mosaic: Green

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Mellinger-G,Mell-G,Mellinger Green

Description
This all sky mosaic was created by Axel Mellinger and is used in SkyView with his permission. A fuller description is available at the survey web site.

Between October 2007 and August 2009 a digital all-sky mosaic was assembled from more than 3000 individual CCD frames. Using an SBIG STL-11000 camera, 70 fields (each covering 40x27 degrees) were imaged from dark-sky locations in South Africa, Texas and Michigan. In order to increase the dynamic range beyond the 16 bits of the camera's analog-to-digital converter (of which approximately 12 bits provide data above the noise leve) three different exposure times (240s, 15s and 0.5 s) were used. Five frames were taken for each exposure time and filter setting. The frames were photometrically calibrated using standard catalog stars and sky background data from the Pioneer 10 and 11 space probes. the panorama has an image scale of 36"/pixel and a limiting magnitude of approximately 14. The survey has an 18 bit dynamic range.

The processing of these data used a custom data pipeline built using IRAF, Source Extractor and SWarp.

The data used here were converted to three independent RGB color planes of 8 bits each and provided to SkyView as a single 36000x18000x3 Cartesian projection cube. To allow users to efficiently sample data in a region of the sky, this cube was broken up into 2100x2100 pixel regions with a 50 pixel overlap between adjacent images. Tiles at the poles were 2100x2050.

In SkyView each color plane comprises a survey. The individual planes may be sampled as surveys independently as Mellinger-R, Mellinger-G and Mellinger-B. The color mosaics can be regenerated by creating an RGB image of all three surveys. Since SkyView may stretch the intensity values within each color, linear scaling and a minimum of 0 and maximum of 255 should be specified to keep the original intensity scalings.

The full spatial resolution data is used for images of less than 30 degrees on a side. If a user requests a larger region, data are sampled from a lower resolution 3600x1800x3 data cube. Please contact the survey author if you need to use the higher resolution data for larger regions. The Mellinger survey is only available in SkyView through the Web site. SkyView-in-a-Jar cannot access the underlying data.

Provenance Axel Mellinger
Copyright Axel Mellinger. Permission is granted for use in research and personal, non-commercial use. Please contact Axel Mellinger for permission for other use. Survey web site
Regime Optical
NSurvey 3
Frequency 566 THz
Bandpass 491-631 THz
Coverage All-sky
PixelSize 0.01 deg/pix
Units Byte-scaled intensity
Resolution 0.02
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Cartesian
Equinox 2000
Epoch 2008-10 to 2009-04
Reference PASP 121, 1180, 2009
Survey web site.

Mellinger All Sky Mosaic: Red

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Mellinger-R,Mell-R,Mellinger Red

Description
This all sky mosaic was created by Axel Mellinger and is used in SkyView with his permission. A fuller description is available at the survey web site.

Between October 2007 and August 2009 a digital all-sky mosaic was assembled from more than 3000 individual CCD frames. Using an SBIG STL-11000 camera, 70 fields (each covering 40x27 degrees) were imaged from dark-sky locations in South Africa, Texas and Michigan. In order to increase the dynamic range beyond the 16 bits of the camera's analog-to-digital converter (of which approximately 12 bits provide data above the noise leve) three different exposure times (240s, 15s and 0.5 s) were used. Five frames were taken for each exposure time and filter setting. The frames were photometrically calibrated using standard catalog stars and sky background data from the Pioneer 10 and 11 space probes. the panorama has an image scale of 36"/pixel and a limiting magnitude of approximately 14. The survey has an 18 bit dynamic range.

The processing of these data used a custom data pipeline built using IRAF, Source Extractor and SWarp.

The data used here were converted to three independent RGB color planes of 8 bits each and provided to SkyView as a single 36000x18000x3 Cartesian projection cube. To allow users to efficiently sample data in a region of the sky, this cube was broken up into 2100x2100 pixel regions with a 50 pixel overlap between adjacent images. Tiles at the poles were 2100x2050.

In SkyView each color plane comprises a survey. The individual planes may be sampled as surveys independently as Mellinger-R, Mellinger-G and Mellinger-B. The color mosaics can be regenerated by creating an RGB image of all three surveys. Since SkyView may stretch the intensity values within each color, linear scaling and a minimum of 0 and maximum of 255 should be specified to keep the original intensity scalings.

The full spatial resolution data is used for images of less than 30 degrees on a side. If a user requests a larger region, data are sampled from a lower resolution 3600x1800x3 data cube. Please contact the survey author if you need to use the higher resolution data for larger regions. The Mellinger survey is only available in SkyView through the Web site. SkyView-in-a-Jar cannot access the underlying data.

Provenance Axel Mellinger
Copyright Axel Mellinger. Permission is granted for use in research and personal, non-commercial use. Please contact Axel Mellinger for permission for other use. Survey web site
Regime Optical
NSurvey 3
Frequency 697 THz
Bandpass 576-788 THz
Coverage All-sky
PixelSize 0.01 deg/pix
Units Byte-scaled intensity
Resolution 0.02
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Cartesian
Equinox 2000
Epoch 2008-10 to 2009-04
Reference PASP 121, 1180, 2009
Survey web site.

Near-Earth Asteriod Tracking System Archive

Short name[s] used to specify survey:NEAT, NEAT/SkyMorph

Description
The NEAT/SkyMorph survey provides access to the archives of the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT) project. NEAT is designed to look for potentially hazardous asteroids, i.e., those whose orbits cross the Earth's. Over 200,000 images are available in the NEAT archive. SkyMorph provides a Web interface to the NEAT images and allows users to select all images in which a given fixed or moving object is found.

Unlike most SkyView surveys, the NEAT data are extremely irregular in their spatial distribution. SkyView's algorithms for mosaicking images together to form large images are not adequate for the NEAT data, so mosaicking is surpressed. Only data within a single NEAT image will be displayed. The system attempts to find the most recent image within which has a offset in both RA and Dec of less than 0.8 degrees. If no such image is found, then an image with the minimum offset is returned, or the search may fail altogether if there are no nearby plates. The NEAT telescope uses an array of 4 CCDs. The backgrounds of the CCDs may differ significantly.

The NEAT survey covers approximately 30% of the sky. Extreme southern and low-Galactic latitude regions are unsurveyed. Coverage is otherwise particularly dense in the ecliptic plane.

NEAT data consists primarily of groups of three images taken with separations of 20 minutes and almost identical positions. SkyView will normally return the last of a 'triplet'. The SkyMorph site can be used to display an overlay of triplets to look for targets which moved during the interval between images.

A catalog of objects detected in the NEAT/SkyMorph pages is accessible through the SkyMorph pages. 'Light-curves' from all images during which an object was in the NEAT field of view can also be generated.

The NEAT data values are in arbitrary density units. To enhance the display data are transformed such that all pixels below the median values are scaled linearly to values 0-20, while all pixels above the median are shifted (but not scaled) to values greater than 20.

Provenance NEAT project
Copyright See the JPL Image Use Policy
Regime Optical
NSurvey 1
Frequency 500 THz
Bandpass 374-750 THz
Coverage Patches of the sky, approximately 30% coverage
PixelScale 1.42"
PixelUnits
Resolution Depends on image. Typically 3"
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Radially distorted gnomonic
Epoch 1995-2006
Reference href=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999AJ...117.1616P> Pravdo, et al. 1999 (ADS)

Sloan Digitized Sky Survey g-band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:SDSSg,SDSS g

Description
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is the deepest large scale survey of the sky currently available. SkyView dynamically queries the SDSS archive (currently release DR9) to retrieve information and resample it into the user requested frame. Further information on the SDSS and many additional services are available at the SDSS Web site.

ProvenanceSloan Digital Sky Survey Team
Copyright See Sloan usage document for distribution rights and acknowledgements.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 5
Frequency 646 THz
Bandpass 567-750 THz
Coverage 14,555 square degrees. The SDDS site provides coverage maps
PixelScale 0.4"
PixelUnits
Resolution 1"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Tangent
Epoch 1998 to 2011
Reference Sloan Digital Sky Survey web site or ADS

Sloan Digitized Sky Survey i-band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:SDSSi,SDSS i

Description
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is the deepest large scale survey of the sky currently available. SkyView dynamically queries the SDSS archive (currently release DR9) to retrieve information and resample it into the user requested frame. Further information on the SDSS and many additional services are available at the SDSS Web site.

ProvenanceSloan Digital Sky Survey Team
Copyright See Sloan usage document for distribution rights and acknowledgements.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 5
Frequency 403 THz
Bandpass 372-439 THz
Coverage 14,555 square degrees. The SDDS site provides coverage maps
PixelScale 0.4"
PixelUnits
Resolution 1"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Tangent
Epoch 1998 to 2011
Reference Sloan Digital Sky Survey web site or ADS

Sloan Digitized Sky Survey r-band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:SDSSr,SDSS r

Description
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is the deepest large scale survey of the sky currently available. SkyView dynamically queries the SDSS archive (currently release DR9) to retrieve information and resample it into the user requested frame. Further information on the SDSS and many additional services are available at the SDSS Web site.

ProvenanceSloan Digital Sky Survey Team
Copyright See Sloan usage document for distribution rights and acknowledgements.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 5
Frequency 490 THz
Bandpass 448-540 THz
Coverage 14,555 square degrees. The SDDS site provides coverage maps
PixelScale 0.4"
PixelUnits
Resolution 1"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Tangent
Epoch 1998 to 2011
Reference Sloan Digital Sky Survey web site or ADS

Sloan Digitized Sky Survey u-band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:SDSSu,SDSS u

Description
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is the deepest large scale survey of the sky currently available. SkyView dynamically queries the SDSS archive (currently release DR9) to retrieve information and resample it into the user requested frame. Further information on the SDSS and many additional services are available at the SDSS Web site.

ProvenanceSloan Digital Sky Survey Team
Copyright See Sloan usage document for distribution rights and acknowledgements.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 5
Frequency 834 THz
Bandpass 772-934 THz
Coverage 14,555 square degrees. The SDDS site provides coverage maps
PixelScale 0.4"
PixelUnits
Resolution 1"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Tangent
Epoch 1998 to 2011
Reference Sloan Digital Sky Survey web site or ADS

Sloan Digitized Sky Survey z-band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:SDSSz,SDSS z

Description
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is the deepest large scale survey of the sky currently available. SkyView dynamically queries the SDSS archive (currently release DR9) to retrieve information and resample it into the user requested frame. Further information on the SDSS and many additional services are available at the SDSS Web site.

ProvenanceSloan Digital Sky Survey Team
Copyright See Sloan usage document for distribution rights and acknowledgements.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 5
Frequency 337 THz
Bandpass 327-348 THz
Coverage 14,555 square degrees. The SDDS site provides coverage maps
PixelScale 0.4"
PixelUnits
Resolution 1"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Tangent
Epoch 1998 to 2011
Reference Sloan Digital Sky Survey web site or ADS

Sloan Digitized Sky Survey g-band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:SDSSdr7g,SDSSdr7 g

Description
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is the deepest large scale survey of the sky currently available. SkyView dynamically queries the SDSS archive to retrieve information and resample it into the user requested frame. Further information on the SDSS and many additional services are available at the SDSS Web site.

ProvenanceSloan Digital Sky Survey Team
Copyright See Sloan usage document for distribution rights and acknowledgements.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 5
Frequency 646 THz
Bandpass 567-750 THz
Coverage 9,583 square degrees. The SDDS site provides coverage maps
PixelScale 0.4"
PixelUnits ADUs
Resolution 1"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Tangent
Epoch ca. 2000
Reference Sloan Digital Sky Survey web site

Sloan Digitized Sky Survey i-band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:SDSSdr7i,SDSSdr7 i

Description
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is the deepest large scale survey of the sky currently available. SkyView dynamically queries the SDSS archive to retrieve information and resample it into the user requested frame. Further information on the SDSS and many additional services are available at the SDSS Web site.

ProvenanceSloan Digital Sky Survey Team
Copyright See Sloan usage document for distribution rights and acknowledgements.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 5
Frequency 403 THz
Bandpass 372-439 THz
Coverage 9,583 square degrees. The SDDS site provides coverage maps
PixelScale 0.4"
PixelUnits ADUs
Resolution 1"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Tangent
Epoch ca. 2000
Reference Sloan Digital Sky Survey web site

Sloan Digitized Sky Survey r-band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:SDSSdr7r,SDSSdr7 r

Description
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is the deepest large scale survey of the sky currently available. SkyView dynamically queries the SDSS archive to retrieve information and resample it into the user requested frame. Further information on the SDSS and many additional services are available at the SDSS Web site.

ProvenanceSloan Digital Sky Survey Team
Copyright See Sloan usage document for distribution rights and acknowledgements.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 5
Frequency 490 THz
Bandpass 448-540 THz
Coverage 9,583 square degrees. The SDDS site provides coverage maps
PixelScale 0.4"
PixelUnits ADUs
Resolution 1"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Tangent
Epoch ca. 2000
Reference Sloan Digital Sky Survey web site

Sloan Digitized Sky Survey u-band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:SDSSdr7u,SDSSdr7 u

Description
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is the deepest large scale survey of the sky currently available. SkyView dynamically queries the SDSS archive to retrieve information and resample it into the user requested frame. Further information on the SDSS and many additional services are available at the SDSS Web site.

ProvenanceSloan Digital Sky Survey Team
Copyright See Sloan usage document for distribution rights and acknowledgements.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 5
Frequency 834 THz
Bandpass 772-934 THz
Coverage 9,583 square degrees. The SDDS site provides coverage maps
PixelScale 0.4"
PixelUnits ADUs
Resolution 1"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Tangent
Epoch ca. 2000
Reference Sloan Digital Sky Survey web site

Sloan Digitized Sky Survey z-band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:SDSSdr7z,SDSSdr7 z

Description
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is the deepest large scale survey of the sky currently available. SkyView dynamically queries the SDSS archive to retrieve information and resample it into the user requested frame. Further information on the SDSS and many additional services are available at the SDSS Web site.

ProvenanceSloan Digital Sky Survey Team
Copyright See Sloan usage document for distribution rights and acknowledgements.
Regime Optical
NSurvey 5
Frequency 337 THz
Bandpass 327-348 THz
Coverage 9,583 square degrees. The SDDS site provides coverage maps
PixelScale 0.4"
PixelUnits ADUs
Resolution 1"
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Tangent
Epoch ca. 2000
Reference Sloan Digital Sky Survey web site

The Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas: Continuum

Short name[s] used to specify survey:SHASSA-C,SHASSA_C,SHASSA C

Description
The Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas is the product of a wide-angle digital imaging survey of the H-alpha emission from the warm ionized interstellar gas of our Galaxy. This atlas covers the southern hemisphere sky (declinations less than +15 degrees). The observations were taken with a robotic camera operating at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile. The atlas consists of 2168 images covering 542 fields. There are four images available for each field: H-alpha, Continuum, Continuum-Corrected (the difference of the H-alpha and Continuum images), and Smoothed (median filtered to 5 pixel, or 4.0 arcminute, resolution to remove star residuals better). The SHASSA web site has more details of the data and the status of this and related projects. Images can also be obtained from the Download Images section at the SHASSA site.

Provenance John E. Gaustad (Swarthmore College), Peter R. McCullough (University of Illinois), Wayne Rosing (Las Cumbres Observatory), and Dave Van Buren (Extrasolar Research Corporation)
Copyright Las Cumbres Observatory, Inc. See the Acknowledgement/Guidelines for Use of Images
Regime Optical
Frequency 457 THz
Bandpass 456-458 THz
Coverage All-sky south of 15
Resolution3.2'
PixelScale 0.79'
PixelUnitsdecirayleighs (dR) or 105/4pi photons/cm2/s/sr
CoordinateSystem Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1997-2000
Reference "A Robotic Wide-Angle H-alpha Survey of the Southern Sky" by J.E. Gaustad, P.R. McCullough, W. Rosing, and D. Van Buren 2001, PASP, 113, 1326. This paper may be downloaded in PDF (2.5 Mb) or Postscript (12.7 Mb) format. or ADS

The Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas: Continuum-Corrected

Short name[s] used to specify survey:SHASSA-CC,SHASSA_CC,SHASSA CC

Description
The Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas is the product of a wide-angle digital imaging survey of the H-alpha emission from the warm ionized interstellar gas of our Galaxy. This atlas covers the southern hemisphere sky (declinations less than +15 degrees). The observations were taken with a robotic camera operating at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile. The atlas consists of 2168 images covering 542 fields. There are four images available for each field: H-alpha, Continuum, Continuum-Corrected (the difference of the H-alpha and Continuum images), and Smoothed (median filtered to 5 pixel, or 4.0 arcminute, resolution to remove star residuals better). The SHASSA web site has more details of the data and the status of this and related projects. Images can also be obtained from the Download Images section at the SHASSA site.

Provenance John E. Gaustad (Swarthmore College), Peter R. McCullough (University of Illinois), Wayne Rosing (Las Cumbres Observatory), and Dave Van Buren (Extrasolar Research Corporation)
Copyright Las Cumbres Observatory, Inc. See the Acknowledgement/Guidelines for Use of Images
Regime Optical
Frequency 457 THz
Bandpass 456-458 THz
Coverage All-sky south of 15
Resolution3.2'
PixelScale 0.79'
PixelUnitsdecirayleighs (dR) or 105/4pi photons/cm2/s/sr
CoordinateSystem Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1997-2000
Reference "A Robotic Wide-Angle H-alpha Survey of the Southern Sky" by J.E. Gaustad, P.R. McCullough, W. Rosing, and D. Van Buren 2001, PASP, 113, 1326. This paper may be downloaded in PDF (2.5 Mb) or Postscript (12.7 Mb) format. or ADS

The Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas: H-Alpha

Short name[s] used to specify survey:SHASSA-H,SHASSA_H,SHASSA H

Description
The Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas is the product of a wide-angle digital imaging survey of the H-alpha emission from the warm ionized interstellar gas of our Galaxy. This atlas covers the southern hemisphere sky (declinations less than +15 degrees). The observations were taken with a robotic camera operating at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile. The atlas consists of 2168 images covering 542 fields. There are four images available for each field: H-alpha, Continuum, Continuum-Corrected (the difference of the H-alpha and Continuum images), and Smoothed (median filtered to 5 pixel, or 4.0 arcminute, resolution to remove star residuals better). The SHASSA web site has more details of the data and the status of this and related projects. Images can also be obtained from the Download Images section at the SHASSA site.

Provenance John E. Gaustad (Swarthmore College), Peter R. McCullough (University of Illinois), Wayne Rosing (Las Cumbres Observatory), and Dave Van Buren (Extrasolar Research Corporation)
Copyright Las Cumbres Observatory, Inc. See the Acknowledgement/Guidelines for Use of Images
Regime Optical
Frequency 457 THz
Bandpass 456-458 THz
Coverage All-sky south of 15
Resolution3.2'
PixelScale 0.79'
PixelUnitsdecirayleighs (dR) or 105/4pi photons/cm2/s/sr
CoordinateSystem Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1997-2000
Reference "A Robotic Wide-Angle H-alpha Survey of the Southern Sky" by J.E. Gaustad, P.R. McCullough, W. Rosing, and D. Van Buren 2001, PASP, 113, 1326. This paper may be downloaded in PDF (2.5 Mb) or Postscript (12.7 Mb) format. or ADS

The Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas: Smoothed

Short name[s] used to specify survey:SHASSA-Sm,SHASSA_Sm,SHASSA Sm

Description
The Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas is the product of a wide-angle digital imaging survey of the H-alpha emission from the warm ionized interstellar gas of our Galaxy. This atlas covers the southern hemisphere sky (declinations less than +15 degrees). The observations were taken with a robotic camera operating at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile. The atlas consists of 2168 images covering 542 fields. There are four images available for each field: H-alpha, Continuum, Continuum-Corrected (the difference of the H-alpha and Continuum images), and Smoothed (median filtered to 5 pixel, or 4.0 arcminute, resolution to remove star residuals better). The SHASSA web site has more details of the data and the status of this and related projects. Images can also be obtained from the Download Images section at the SHASSA site.

Provenance John E. Gaustad (Swarthmore College), Peter R. McCullough (University of Illinois), Wayne Rosing (Las Cumbres Observatory), and Dave Van Buren (Extrasolar Research Corporation)
Copyright Las Cumbres Observatory, Inc. See the Acknowledgement/Guidelines for Use of Images
Regime Optical
Frequency 457 THz
Bandpass 456-458 THz
Coverage All-sky south of 15
Resolution3.2'
PixelScale 0.79'
PixelUnitsdecirayleighs (dR) or 105/4pi photons/cm2/s/sr
CoordinateSystem Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1997-2000
Reference "A Robotic Wide-Angle H-alpha Survey of the Southern Sky" by J.E. Gaustad, P.R. McCullough, W. Rosing, and D. Van Buren 2001, PASP, 113, 1326. This paper may be downloaded in PDF (2.5 Mb) or Postscript (12.7 Mb) format. or ADS

Ultraviolet surveys

Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer: 171 A

Short name[s] used to specify survey:euve171, EUVE 171 A

Description
The EUVE satellite surveyed the entire sky in the extreme ultraviolet through a set of four filters. The filters include:
  • Lexan/Boron filter: peak at 83A (full range 50-180)
  • Aluminium/Carbon/Titanium : 171A (160-240)
  • Aluminium/Titanium/Antimony: 405A (345-605)
  • Tin/SiO: 555A (500-740)

The data currently in SkyView is direct from the Center for EUVE.

Provenance Center for Extreme UV Astronomy, UCB
Regime Ultraviolet
Copyright Public domain
Frequency 17.3 PHz
Bandpass 8.1-17.6 PHz
PixelScale 0.025 degrees/pixel
PixelUnits counts
Resolution ca. 3'
CoordinateSystem Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic/Tan
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1992-07 to 1993-01
Reference Boywer et al 1996 (ADS)

Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer: 405 A

Short name[s] used to specify survey:euve405, EUVE 405 A

Description
The EUVE satellite surveyed the entire sky in the extreme ultraviolet through a set of four filters. The filters include:
  • Lexan/Boron filter: peak at 83A (full range 50-180)
  • Aluminium/Carbon/Titanium : 171A (160-240)
  • Aluminium/Titanium/Antimony: 405A (345-605)
  • Tin/SiO: 555A (500-740)

The data currently in SkyView is direct from the Center for EUVE.

Provenance Center for Extreme UV Astronomy, UCB
Regime Ultraviolet
Copyright Public domain
Frequency 7.4 PHz
Bandpass 5.0-7.9 PHz
PixelScale 0.025 degrees/pixel
PixelUnits counts
Resolution ca. 3'
CoordinateSystem Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic/Tan
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1992-07 to 1993-01
Reference Boywer et al 1996 (ADS)

Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer: 555 A

Short name[s] used to specify survey:euve555, EUVE 555 A

Description
The EUVE satellite surveyed the entire sky in the extreme ultraviolet through a set of four filters. The filters include:
  • Lexan/Boron filter: peak at 83A (full range 50-180)
  • Aluminium/Carbon/Titanium : 171A (160-240)
  • Aluminium/Titanium/Antimony: 405A (345-605)
  • Tin/SiO: 555A (500-740)

The data currently in SkyView is direct from the Center for EUVE.

Provenance Center for Extreme UV Astronomy, UCB
Regime Ultraviolet
Copyright Public domain
Frequency 5.4 PHz
Bandpass 3.75-6 PHz
PixelScale 0.025 degrees/pixel
PixelUnits counts
Resolution ca. 3'
CoordinateSystem Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic/Tan
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1992-07 to 1993-01
Reference Boywer et al 1996 (ADS)

Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer: 83 A

Short name[s] used to specify survey:euve83, EUVE 83 A

Description
The EUVE satellite surveyed the entire sky in the extreme ultraviolet through a set of four filters. The filters include:
  • Lexan/Boron filter: peak at 83A (full range 50-180)
  • Aluminium/Carbon/Titanium : 171A (160-240)
  • Aluminium/Titanium/Antimony: 405A (345-605)
  • Tin/SiO: 555A (500-740)

The data currently in SkyView is direct from the Center for EUVE.

Provenance Center for Extreme UV Astronomy, UCB
Regime Ultraviolet
Copyright Public domain
Frequency 36 PHz
Bandpass 15-43 PHz
PixelScale 0.025 degrees/pixel
PixelUnits counts
Resolution ca. 3'
CoordinateSystem Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic/Tan
Equinox 2000
Epoch 1992-07 to 1993-01
Reference Boywer et al 1996 (ADS)

Galaxy Explorer All Sky Survey: Far UV

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GalexFar,GALEX Far UV

Description
The GALEX, Galaxy Explorer, mission was launched by a Pegasus-XL vehicle on April 28 2003 into a 690km altitude, 29 degree inclination, circular orbit with a 98.6 minute period. The GALEX instrument allows imaging and spectroscopic observations to be made in two ultraviolet bands, Far UV (FUV) 1350-1780A and Near UV (NUV) 1770-2730A. The instrument provides simultaneous co-aligned FUV and NUV images with spatial resolution 4.3 and 5.3 arcseconds respectively. Details of the performance of the instrument and detectors can be found in Morrissey et al. (2007) ApJS, 173, 682.

The SkyView GALEX surveys mosaic the intensity images of All-Sky Survey images. For a given pixel only the nearest image is used. Since a given GALEX observation is circular, this maximizes the coverage compared with default image finding algorithms which use the distance from edge of the image.

As of February 10, 2011 SkyView uses the GR6 data release for the entire sky.

Provenance All data is downloaded from the MAST GALEX archive.
Copyright Public domain.
Regime Ultraviolet
NSurvey 2
Frequency 1.96 PHz
Bandpass 1.68-2.23 PHz
Coverage All sky/patchy
PixelScale 1.5"
PixelUnits Intensity
Resolution 4.3"
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Tangent
Epoch 2003 to 2009
Reference The GALEX Guest Invesitigator and MAST Archive sites provide documentation and characteristics of the GALEX observatory and archive. The technical document provides instrument details.

Galaxy Explorer All Sky Survey: Near UV

Short name[s] used to specify survey: GalexNear,GALEX NEAR UV

Description
The GALEX, Galaxy Explorer, mission was launched by a Pegasus-XL vehicle on April 28 2003 into a 690km altitude, 29 degree inclination, circular orbit with a 98.6 minute period. The GALEX instrument allows imaging and spectroscopic observations to be made in two ultraviolet bands, Far UV (FUV) 1350-1780A and Near UV (NUV) 1770-2730A. The instrument provides simultaneous co-aligned FUV and NUV images with spatial resolution 4.3 and 5.3 arcseconds respectively. Details of the performance of the instrument and detectors can be found in Morrissey et al. (2007) ApJS, 173, 682.

The SkyView GALEX surveys mosaic the intensity images of All-Sky Survey images. For a given pixel only the nearest image is used. Since a given GALEX observation is circular, this maximizes the coverage compared with default image finding algorithms which use the distance from edge of the image.

As of February 10, 2011, SkyView uses the GALEX GR6 data release.

Provenance All data is downloaded from the MAST GALEX archive.
Copyright Public domain.
Regime Ultraviolet
NSurvey 2
Frequency 1.32 PHz
Bandpass 1.05-1.69 PHz
Coverage All sky/patchy
PixelScale 1.5"
PixelUnits Intensity
Resolution 5.3"
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Tangent
Epoch 2003 to 2009
Reference The GALEX Guest Invesitigator and MAST Archive sites provide documentation and characteristics of the GALEX observatory and archive. The technical document provides instrument details.

Southern GOODS Field: VLT VIMOS Observations, U band

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODS VIMOS U, GOODS: VLT VIMOS U

Description
As part of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), deep imaging in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) has been carried out, using the VIMOS instrument mounted at the Melipal Unit Telescope of the VLT at ESO's Cerro Paranal Observatory, Chile.

This data release contains the coadded images in U band from the ESO large programme 168.A-0485 (P.I. C. Cesarsky) which have been obtained in service mode observations between August 2004 and fall 2006. The 1-sigma depth for VIMOS U band in the area covered by the GOODS-ACS observations is ~30 AB (within an aperture of 1" radius, ranging from 29.5 and 30.2 AB). The PSF of the VIMOS U band mosaic is ~0.8" FWHM, but varies over the field.

Also included in this data release is a coadded image in R band obtained from data retrieved from the ESO archive. Due to the different observing strategies adopted in the programmes the resulting coverage of the GOODS-ACS area is more complex than for the U band. The depth of the VIMOS R band mosaic over the ACS area ranges from ~28 AB to 29 AB (1-sigma, 1" aperture radius). The PSF of the VIMOS R band mosaic is ~0".7 FWHM and varies over the field. [Adapted from reference web site.]

Regime Ultraviolet
Frequency 821 THz
Bandwidth 753-903 THz
Provenance Data downloaded from VLT archive
Copyright Data freely available from ESO archive. When using data products provided in this release, acknowledgement should be given in the text to the ESO/GOODS programme, referring to the publication Nonino et al. 2009. In addition, please also use the following statement in your articles when using these data: "Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla or Paranal Observatories under programme number 168.A-0485."
NSurvey 2
Resolution 0.7-0.8"
PixelSize0.2"
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
PixelUnitsADU/s
Epoch2004-8-11 to 2006-10-27
Reference Paper and web site.>

The Hawaii Hubble Deep Field North: Band U

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Hawaii HDF U, Hawaii: HDF U

Description
The Hawaii-HDF-N is an intensive multi-color imaging survey of 0.2 sq. degrees centered on the HDF-N. Data were collected on the NOAO 4m Mayall telescope, the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan 8.2m Subaru telescope and the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope. Deep U, B, V, R, I, and z' data were obtained over the whole field and deep HK' data over the Chandra Deep Field North. Details are available in the references. [Adapted from reference web site.]

Two different images are given in the V band (V0201 and V0401) from observations separated by about a month that had substantial differences in seeing.

Provenance Data downloaded from the reference web site. A formatting error in the FITS files was corrected.
Copyright Public Domain. Users are requested to include a reference to Capak, et al. 2004 when using these data.
Regime Ultraviolet
NSurvey 8
Frequency822 THz
Bandpass780-868 THz
Coverage0.000005
Resolution 0.67-1.26"
PixelScale0.3"
CoordinateSystemICRS
ProjectionGnomonic
Epoch1999/2002
Reference 2004AJ....127..180C or the web site.

ROSAT Wide Field Camera: F1

Short name[s] used to specify survey:wfcf1, ROSAT WFC F1

Description
This survey is a mosaic of images taken by the ROSAT Wide Field Camera and comprises of 12,743 seperates fields in each of two filters. Each field covers a region 2.6° x 2.6° with a 0.3° overlap. Currently, this data is not a complete coverage of the sky; regions near the northern ecliptic pole are currently not included.

Provenance University of Leicester
Copyright University of Leicester used by permission (no restrictions on not for profit use)
Regime Ultraviolet
NSurvey 2
Frequency 19.3 PHz
Bandpass 15-27 PHz
Coverage all-sky
PixelScale 1 arcminute/pixel
PixelUnit Counts
Resolution 3'
Coordinates Ecliptic
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1990-07 to 1991-01
Reference ADS

ROSAT Wide Field Camera: F2

Short name[s] used to specify survey:wfcf2, ROSAT WFC F2

Description
This survey is a mosaic of images taken by the ROSAT Wide Field Camera and comprises of 12,743 seperates fields in each of two filters. Each field covers a region 2.6° x 2.6° with a 0.3° overlap. Currently, this data is not a complete coverage of the sky; regions near the northern ecliptic pole are currently not included.

Provenance University of Leicester
Copyright University of Leicester used by permission (no restrictions on not for profit use)
Regime Ultraviolet
NSurvey 2
Frequency 30 PHz
Bandpass 21-50 PHz
Coverage all-sky
PixelScale 1 arcminute/pixel
PixelUnit Counts
Resolution 3'
Coordinates Ecliptic
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1990-07 to 1991-01
Reference ADS

X-ray surveys

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 14-20 keV: flux

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-flux-1, BAT flux 1, BAT flux 14-20

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 4.04 EHz
Bandpass 3.38-4.84 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
PixelUnits cts/s/det
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 14-20 keV: snr

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-snr-1, BAT snr 1, BAT snr 14-20

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 4.04 EHz
Bandpass 3.38-4.84 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 20-24 keV: flux

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-flux-2, BAT flux 2, BAT flux 20-24

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 5.29 EHz
Bandpass 4.84-5.80 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
PixelUnits cts/s/det
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 20-24 keV: snr

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-snr-2, BAT snr 2, BAT snr 20-24

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 5.29 EHz
Bandpass 4.84-5.80 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 24-35 keV: flux

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-flux-3, BAT flux 3, BAT flux 24-35

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 7.00 EHz
Bandpass 5.80-8.46 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
PixelUnits cts/s/det
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 24-35 keV: snr

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-snr-3, BAT snr 3, BAT snr 24-35

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 7.00 EHz
Bandpass 5.80-8.46 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 35-50 keV: flux

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-flux-4, BAT flux 4, BAT flux 35-50

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 10.1 EHz
Bandpass 8.46-12.1 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
PixelUnits cts/s/det
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 35-50 keV: snr

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-snr-4, BAT snr 4, BAT snr 35-50

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 10.1 EHz
Bandpass 8.46-12.1 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 50-75 keV: flux

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-flux-5, BAT flux 5, BAT flux 50-75

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 14.8 EHz
Bandpass 12.1-18.1 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
PixelUnits cts/s/det
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 50-75 keV: snr

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-snr-5, BAT snr 5, BAT snr 50-75

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 14.8 EHz
Bandpass 12.1-18.1 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 75-100 keV: flux

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-flux-6, BAT flux 6, BAT flux 75-100

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 20.9 EHz
Bandpass 18.1-24.2 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
PixelUnits cts/s/det
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 75-100 keV: snr

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-snr-6, BAT snr 6, BAT snr 75-100

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 20.9 EHz
Bandpass 18.1-24.2 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 100-150 keV: flux

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-flux-7, BAT flux 7, BAT flux 100-150

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 29.6 EHz
Bandpass 24.2-36.3 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
PixelUnits cts/s/det
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 100-150 keV: snr

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-snr-7, BAT snr 7, BAT snr 100-150

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 29.6 EHz
Bandpass 24.2-36.3 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 150-195 keV: flux

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-flux-8, BAT flux 8, BAT flux 150-195

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 41.4 EHz
Bandpass 36.3-48.2 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
PixelUnits cts/s/det
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 150-195 keV: snr

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-snr-8, BAT snr 8, BAT snr 150-195

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 41.4 EHz
Bandpass 36.3-48.2 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

Swift BAT 70 Month All-Sky Survey: 14-195 keV: snr

Short name[s] used to specify survey:BAT-snr-sum, BAT snr sum, BAT snr 14-195

Description
This BAT Hard X-ray Survey data is the 70-month survey product of the BAT instrument on the Swift observatory. Swift/BAT is a wide field-of-view (70x100 degrees) hard X-ray imager consisting of a coded mask and a large array of CdZnTe detectors (with an effective area of ~ 5000 cm2).

BAT is sensitive in the energy range 14-195 keV. The data are divided into 8 energy bands
BandEnergy (keV)Frequency (EHz)
1 14-20 3.38-4.84
2 20-24 4.84-5.80
3 24-35 5.80-8.46
4 35-50 8.46-12.1
5 50-75 12.1-18.1
6 75-100 18.1-24.2
7 100-150 24.2-36.3
8 150-195 36.3-47.2
Sum (SNR only)14-195 3.38-47.2
Each band is represented as as two separate surveys, a signal-to-noise (SNR) map and a flux map. (e.g., BAT-snr-1 or BAT SNR 1 or BAT SNR 14-20, or BAT-Flux-1, ...). An additional summed survey, BAT-SNR-SUM or BAT SNR SUM or BAT SNR 14-195, is also available, but there is no summed flux survey. In our Web interface only the SNR surveys are shown in the Web form. Users can get flux maps corresponding to a given SNR image from the results pages. The batch interfaces may directly query any of the surveys since the user chooses the names explicitly rather than from a selection box.

The values displayed in the significance maps are the local signal to noise ratio in each pixel. The noise in these coded-mask images follows a Gaussian distribution with center at zero and a characteristic width (sigma) of 1.0. The noise is calculated locally for each pixel by measuring the RMS value of all pixel values in an annulus around each pixel and hence includs both statistical and systematic components. Known sources are excluded from the annuli.

The signal in each pixel is taken from the flux maps.

The flux values are in the native BAT survey units of counts/sec/detector. The detector is an individual piece of CZT in the BAT array with an area of 1.6 x 10-7m2.

While the Swift mission is primarily designed to follow gamma-ray bursts, the random distribution of bursts in the sky means that these survey's sky coverage is relatively uniform with the exposure at any point varying between about 6 to 16 megaseconds. The survey limits for source detection are about 10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over about half the sky and 1.3x10-11 ergs/s/cm2 over 90%.

These data replace the 9-month BAT datasets which we have retired. If you wish access to the older data please let us know. Note that for the 9-month data we provided access through the web page to the flux data and gave links to the signal-to-noise maps. Since the existence of sources is most easily seen in the SNR maps, we decided to invert that for this release.

For the 8 band data, the source data were provided by the BAT team as 6 FITS files. Each of these contained the 8 bands in separate image extensions for a region centered at l=0,b=+/-90 or l=0,90,180,270,b=0, the centers of 6 cubic facets. However these data are not the classical cube-faced projections, e.g., as used in COBE data. The data on the facets overlap, so that this is just a convenient way to tile the sky. SkyView separated each of the FITS image extensions into a separate file, but no other modifications were made to the data. The summed image was provided as six separate files.

Provenance NASA BAT Team
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 9
Frequency 12 EHz
Bandpass 3.38-47.2 EHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 2.8'
Resolution 20'
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 2005-2010
Reference The 70-Month Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Survey, (Baumgartner et al 2013)

GOODS Chandra ACIS: Full band (0.5-8 keV)

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODSACISFB,GOODS: Chandra ACIS FB, GOODS ACIS FB

Description
This survey comprises the 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field North and 4 Ms Deep Field South ACIS observations. All observations are co-added into two fields in the north and south. Data are provided in three bands, the soft 0.5-2 keV band, the hard 2.0-8.0 keV and the full 0.5 to 8 keV band.

Provenance Taken from the Neil Brandt's PSU web sites for the the north and south.
Copyright Public domain
RegimeX-ray
Frequency 480 PHz
Bandpass 121-1900 PHz
Coverage Approximately 10.e-5 around two goods regions (roughly 0.4 square degrees)
NSurvey 3
PixelScale 0.5"
PixelUnitsCounts
CoordinateSystem ICRS
Resolution 1"
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1999/2010
Reference Published descriptions of the North and South field observations.

GOODS Chandra ACIS: Hard band (2-8 keV)

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODSACISHB,GOODS: Chandra ACIS HB, GOODS ACIS HB

Description
This survey comprises the 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field North and 4 Ms Deep Field South ACIS observations. All observations are co-added into two fields in the north and south. Data are provided in three bands, the soft 0.5-2 keV band, the hard 2.0-8.0 keV and the full 0.5 to 8 keV band.

Provenance Taken from the Neil Brandt's PSU web sites for the the north and south.
Copyright Public domain
RegimeX-ray
Frequency 960 PHz
Bandpass 480-1900 PHz
Coverage Approximately 10.e-5 around two goods regions (roughly 0.4 square degrees)
NSurvey 3
PixelScale 0.5"
PixelUnitsCounts
CoordinateSystem ICRS
Resolution 1"
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1999/2010
Reference Published descriptions of the North and South field observations.

GOODS Chandra ACIS: Soft band (0.5-2 keV)

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GOODSACISSB,GOODS: Chandra ACIS SB, GOODS ACIS SB

Description
This survey comprises the 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field North and 4 Ms Deep Field South ACIS observations. All observations are co-added into two fields in the north and south. Data are provided in three bands, the soft 0.5-2 keV band, the hard 2.0-8.0 keV and the full 0.5 to 8 keV band.

Provenance Taken from the Neil Brandt's PSU web sites for the the north and south.
Copyright Public domain
RegimeX-ray
Frequency 240 PHz
Bandpass 121-480 PHz
Coverage Approximately 10.e-5 around two goods regions (roughly 0.4 square degrees)
NSurvey 3
PixelScale 0.5"
PixelUnitsCounts
CoordinateSystem ICRS
Resolution 1"
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1999/2010
Reference Published descriptions of the North and South field observations.

GRANAT/SIGMA Flux

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GRANAT_SIGMA_Flux,GRANAT/SIGMA Flux,

Description
The Soviet orbital observatory GRANAT was launched in December 1989 and was operational till November 1998. One of the main instruments of the observatory was the French-Soviet hard X-ray coded mask telescope SIGMA (Paul et al.1 1991, Adv.Space Res., 11, 279). It was the first space telescope that used coded aperture technique for reconstruction of sky images in hard X-rays (35-1300 keV). The angular resolution of the telescope was approximately 12' and the accuracy of a source localization is approximately 2-3'.

SIGMA discovered numerous interesting hard X-ray sources including GRS 1758-258, which is located only 40' from bright soft X-ray source GX 5-1. It detected hard X-ray flux from X-ray burster A1742-294, which is very near to bright black hole binary 1E1740.7-2942. SIGMA set an upper limit on the hard X-ray flux of from the central supermassive black hole in our Galaxy.

During the period 1990-1998 SIGMA observed more that one quarter of the sky with sensitivity better than 100 mCrab. The Galactic Center region had the deepest exposure ( approximately 9 million sec), with the sensitivity to a source discovery (S/N > ~ 5) or approximately 10 mCrab.

A list of all detected sources with references to publications on them is presented in the paper of Revnivtsev et al. 2004, Astr. Lett. v.6. In these survey images (40-100 keV) all performed observations are averaged together. Transient sources that were discovered by SIGMA may not visible in the averaged image.

This survey has some features that users should keep in mind. The SIGMA telescope is a complicated instrument and is strongly dominated by the accuracy of the background subtraction. The presence of a very bright source in the field of view of the telescope sometimes cannot be fully accounted for and as a result of it some 'ghost' sources can appear. Such features can be seen in the regions near very bright sources like Crab Nebula, Cyg X-1, Nova Per 1992, Nova Mus 1991, Nova Oph 1993, and in the Galactic Center region. In addition to its nominal field of view (~17x17 deg) located around the optical axis of the telescope, SIGMA had another window of relatively high transparency of its shield, approximately 20-30° apart from the optical axis. Becuase of this a very bright sources like Cyg X-1 can cause non zero illumination of the SIGMA detector if they are located approximately 20-30° from the optical axis. The ring-like features caused by this effect, can be seen around Cyg X-1, and Nova Per 1992.

The count rate of detected sources (or upper limits) can be roughly translated into mCrab using the fact that that Crab nebula gives the count rate approximately 2.8e-3 cnts/s in the units, provided in 'flux' maps

Provenance High Energy Astrophysics Department, Space Research Institute, Moscow, Russia; CEA, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay Orme des Merisiers, France; Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, Toulouse, France; Fédération de Recherche Astroparticule et Cosmologie Université de Paris, France
Copyright Public Domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 2 (significance and flux)
Frequency 16 EHz
Bandpass 10-24 EHz
Coverage Approximately one quarter of the sky
PixelScale 3.24 arc minutes/pix
Units Statistical significance, Flux
Resolution 12 arc minutes
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic
Equinox 1950
Epoch 1983-1989
Reference Hard X-ray sky survey with the SIGMA telescope aboard GRANAT observatory, Revnivtsev M., Sunyaev R., Gilfanov M., Churazov E., Goldwurm A., Paul J., Mandrou P., Roques J.-P., Astronomy Letters 2004, v.30 (ADS)

GRANAT/SIGMA Significance

Short name[s] used to specify survey:GRANAT_SIGMA_Sig,GRANAT/SIGMA Sig, GRANAT/SIGMA

Description
The Soviet orbital observatory GRANAT was launched in December 1989 and was operational till November 1998. One of the main instruments of the observatory was the French-Soviet hard X-ray coded mask telescope SIGMA (Paul et al.1 1991, Adv.Space Res., 11, 279). It was the first space telescope that used coded aperture technique for reconstruction of sky images in hard X-rays (35-1300 keV). The angular resolution of the telescope was approximately 12' and the accuracy of a source localization is approximately 2-3'.

SIGMA discovered numerous interesting hard X-ray sources including GRS 1758-258, which is located only 40' from bright soft X-ray source GX 5-1. It detected hard X-ray flux from X-ray burster A1742-294, which is very near to bright black hole binary 1E1740.7-2942. SIGMA set an upper limit on the hard X-ray flux of from the central supermassive black hole in our Galaxy.

During the period 1990-1998 SIGMA observed more that one quarter of the sky with sensitivity better than 100 mCrab. The Galactic Center region had the deepest exposure ( approximately 9 million sec), with the sensitivity to a source discovery (S/N > ~ 5) or approximately 10 mCrab.

A list of all detected sources with references to publications on them is presented in the paper of Revnivtsev et al. 2004, Astr. Lett. v.6. In these survey images (40-100 keV) all performed observations are averaged together. Transient sources that were discovered by SIGMA may not visible in the averaged image.

This survey has some features that users should keep in mind. The SIGMA telescope is a complicated instrument and is strongly dominated by the accuracy of the background subtraction. The presence of a very bright source in the field of view of the telescope sometimes cannot be fully accounted for and as a result of it some 'ghost' sources can appear. Such features can be seen in the regions near very bright sources like Crab Nebula, Cyg X-1, Nova Per 1992, Nova Mus 1991, Nova Oph 1993, and in the Galactic Center region. In addition to its nominal field of view (~17x17 deg) located around the optical axis of the telescope, SIGMA had another window of relatively high transparency of its shield, approximately 20-30° apart from the optical axis. Becuase of this a very bright sources like Cyg X-1 can cause non zero illumination of the SIGMA detector if they are located approximately 20-30° from the optical axis. The ring-like features caused by this effect, can be seen around Cyg X-1, and Nova Per 1992.

The count rate of detected sources (or upper limits) can be roughly translated into mCrab using the fact that that Crab nebula gives the count rate approximately 2.8e-3 cnts/s in the units, provided in 'flux' maps

Provenance High Energy Astrophysics Department, Space Research Institute, Moscow, Russia; CEA, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay Orme des Merisiers, France; Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, Toulouse, France; Fédération de Recherche Astroparticule et Cosmologie Université de Paris, France
Copyright Public Domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 2 (significance and flux)
Frequency 16 EHz
Bandpass 10-24 EHz
Coverage Approximately one quarter of the sky
PixelScale 3.24 arc minutes/pix
Units Statistical significance, Flux
Resolution 12 arc minutes
Coordinates Equatorial
Projection Gnomonic
Equinox 1950
Epoch 1983-1989
Reference Hard X-ray sky survey with the SIGMA telescope aboard GRANAT observatory, Revnivtsev M., Sunyaev R., Gilfanov M., Churazov E., Goldwurm A., Paul J., Mandrou P., Roques J.-P., Astronomy Letters 2004, v.30 (ADS)

HEAO 1A

Short name[s] used to specify survey:HEAO1A, HEAO 1 A-2

Description
These data were generated at the HEASARC in 1994. Certain gaps and streaks in the image have been fixed by interpolating over the the gap. Typically these gaps are no more than a pixel or two wide. A brief description of the satellite and the data analysis follows. The map used in SkyView is the map designated 322_15_tot_ecl_samp.img in the HEASARC FTP area. Many other maps are available. These differ in epoch, resolution, energy band, coordinate system and projection, and sampling methods. Details are given in the README file in the archive.

See Allen, Jahoda, and Whitlock (1994) for full details about the available maps, their processing, and methods for converting the map intensities into familiar physical units.

Provenance NASA, HEASARC
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
Frequency 2.4 EHz
Bandpass 0.48-14.5 EHz
CoordinateSystem Ecliptic
Projection Cartesion
PixelScale 0.5x0.25 degrees
Units Counts/Secont
Coverage All-sky
NSurvey 1
Resolution Approxmately 2 degrees
Epoch 1978 to 1979
Reference Shafer, R.A. 1983, Spatial Fluctuations in the Diffuse X-Ray Background, University of Maryland Ph.D. thesis.
Allen, J., Jahoda, K., and Whitlock, L. 1994, HEAO-1 and the A2 experiment, Legacy, 5.
also
HEAO1

ROSAT High Resolution Image Pointed Observations Mosaic: Intensity

Short name[s] used to specify survey:HRIint, HRI

Description
This survey was generated from all available ROSAT HRI observations. Data were mosaicked into 1.1 degree tiles by SkyView. Exposure maps were generated for each HRI observation using the hriexpmap FTOOL. For each tile, all observations that might contribute to that tile were located and added to count and exposure map tiles. Exposures for each observation were calculated using a nearest neighbor interpolation of the center of the tile pixels to the exposure map pixels. Counts were computed by projecting the RA and Decs of each eligible photon into the appropriate tile pixel. Only photons with a PHA > 3 were included in the mosaic and within each observation only counts within the region where the exposure was greater than half the maximum exposure were included.

Provenance Data from GSFC and MPE. SkyView mosaic generated by SkyView.
Copyright Public Domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 1
Frequency 260 PHz
Bandpass 24-480 PHz
Coverage Observation patches covering ~1.8% of the sky.
PixelScale 5"
PixelUnits
Resolution 10"
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1991 to 1999
Reference The ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) Calibration Report

INTEGRAL/Spectral Imager Galactic Center Survey

Short name[s] used to specify survey:INTEGRALSPI_gc, INTEGRAL/SPI GC

Description
The INTEGRAL observatory (Winkler et al. 2003, A&A, 411, L1) was launched in October 2002. The spectrograph SPI (Vedrenne et al. 2003, A&A, 411, L63) consists of 19 Germanium detectors and is capable of imaging in the 20 - 8000 keV band because of a coded mask. Part of the core program of the INTEGRAL mission is a study of the Galactic Centre, the Galactic Centre Deep Exposure (GCDE).

The SPI significance map is based on the public GCDE data and uses data in the 20 - 40 keV energy range. The analysis of the data was done using the SPIROS software (Skinner & Connell 2003, A&A, 411, L123). This software uses the 'Iterative Removal of Sources' technique in order to find the most significant sources. In the output significance map the sources found in this process are put on top of the residual map as points with a FWHM of 1 degree.

Current data respresent the combination of all public observations as of September 1, 2004.

Provenance INTEGRAL Science Data Center, Geneva, Switzerland
Copyright Public Domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 1
Frequency 6.8 EHz
Bandpass 2.9-4.8 EHz
Coverage
PixelScale 6 arc minutes/pix
Units Statistical significance
Resolution approximately 1 degree
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Aitoff
Epoch March 2002 - May 2003
Reference INTEGRAL Guest Observer Facility
SPI Reference at (ADS)

Nine Year INTEGRAL IBIS 17-35 keV Galactic Plane Survey: Exposure

Short name[s] used to specify survey:INT GAL 17-35 Exp, INTGAL1735E

Description
This survey combines 9 years of INTEGRAL IBIS observations from December 2002 through January 2011 into a single Galactic Plane image. A total of 135 megaseconds of exposure is included in the observations used. Survey data is generated for the Galactic plane in the region |b| <= 17.5. The original flux data has been convolved with 5' seeing kernel. To minimize loss of resolution in transformations, the Lanczos sampler is suggested as the default, but may be overriden by the user. Both the preconvolved and standard convolved maps are available at the Web site.

The exposure and sensitivity vary considerably over the coverage region, but 90% of the field has a limiting sensitivity better than 2.2 x 10-11ergs s-1cm-2 or about 1.56 mCrab. Further details of the survey construction are given in the reference.

The flux and significance maps use the PSF convolved maps from the survey. The flux maps are in millicrab units. Exposure maps (with exposures in seconds) were from the exposure extension in the MAPDLD files and give the dead-time corrected exposure in seconds.

Links to the exposure and significance maps corresponding to the requested region will be given in the Web output. These maps can be generated directly in the CLI interface. For each waveband the flux, significance and exposure maps are available with just the end of the survey names distinguishing them (e.g., INT Gal 17-35 [Flux|Sig|Exp] or INTGal1735[F|S|E])

Provenance Krivonos et al., 2012
Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland and Spain), Poland, and participation of Russia and the USA.
Copyright Space Research Institute (IKI), Moscow, Russia
Regime X-ray
Frequency 6 EHz
Bandpass 4.4-8.5 EHz
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection Cartesian
PixelScale 4'
Units Flux (milliCrabs), Exposure (s) and Significance
Coverage Galactic plane, |b| < 17.5 (30% of the sky)
NSurvey 9 [(Flux,Significance,Exposure) x 3 bands]
Resolution Gaussian 5'
Epoch December 2002 to January 2011
Reference Survey paper: Krivonos et al., 2012
Web site

Nine Year INTEGRAL IBIS 17-35 keV Galactic Plane Survey: Flux

Short name[s] used to specify survey:INT GAL 17-35 Flux, INTGAL1735F

Description
This survey combines 9 years of INTEGRAL IBIS observations from December 2002 through January 2011 into a single Galactic Plane image. A total of 135 megaseconds of exposure is included in the observations used. Survey data is generated for the Galactic plane in the region |b| <= 17.5. The original flux data has been convolved with 5' seeing kernel. To minimize loss of resolution in transformations, the Lanczos sampler is suggested as the default, but may be overriden by the user. Both the preconvolved and standard convolved maps are available at the Web site.

The exposure and sensitivity vary considerably over the coverage region, but 90% of the field has a limiting sensitivity better than 2.2 x 10-11ergs s-1cm-2 or about 1.56 mCrab. Further details of the survey construction are given in the reference.

The flux and significance maps use the PSF convolved maps from the survey. The flux maps are in millicrab units. Exposure maps (with exposures in seconds) were from the exposure extension in the MAPDLD files and give the dead-time corrected exposure in seconds.

Links to the exposure and significance maps corresponding to the requested region will be given in the Web output. These maps can be generated directly in the CLI interface. For each waveband the flux, significance and exposure maps are available with just the end of the survey names distinguishing them (e.g., INT Gal 17-35 [Flux|Sig|Exp] or INTGal1735[F|S|E])

Provenance Krivonos et al., 2012
Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland and Spain), Poland, and participation of Russia and the USA.
Copyright Space Research Institute (IKI), Moscow, Russia
Regime X-ray
Frequency 6 EHz
Bandpass 4.4-8.5 EHz
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection Cartesian
PixelScale 4'
Units Flux (milliCrabs), Exposure (s) and Significance
Coverage Galactic plane, |b| < 17.5 (30% of the sky)
NSurvey 9 [(Flux,Significance,Exposure) x 3 bands]
Resolution Gaussian 5'
Epoch December 2002 to January 2011
Reference Survey paper: Krivonos et al., 2012
Web site

Nine Year INTEGRAL IBIS 17-35 keV Galactic Plane Survey: Significance

Short name[s] used to specify survey:INT GAL 17-35 Sig, INTGAL1735S

Description
This survey combines 9 years of INTEGRAL IBIS observations from December 2002 through January 2011 into a single Galactic Plane image. A total of 135 megaseconds of exposure is included in the observations used. Survey data is generated for the Galactic plane in the region |b| <= 17.5. The original flux data has been convolved with 5' seeing kernel. To minimize loss of resolution in transformations, the Lanczos sampler is suggested as the default, but may be overriden by the user. Both the preconvolved and standard convolved maps are available at the Web site.

The exposure and sensitivity vary considerably over the coverage region, but 90% of the field has a limiting sensitivity better than 2.2 x 10-11ergs s-1cm-2 or about 1.56 mCrab. Further details of the survey construction are given in the reference.

The flux and significance maps use the PSF convolved maps from the survey. The flux maps are in millicrab units. Exposure maps (with exposures in seconds) were from the exposure extension in the MAPDLD files and give the dead-time corrected exposure in seconds.

Links to the exposure and significance maps corresponding to the requested region will be given in the Web output. These maps can be generated directly in the CLI interface. For each waveband the flux, significance and exposure maps are available with just the end of the survey names distinguishing them (e.g., INT Gal 17-35 [Flux|Sig|Exp] or INTGal1735[F|S|E])

Provenance Krivonos et al., 2012
Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland and Spain), Poland, and participation of Russia and the USA.
Copyright Space Research Institute (IKI), Moscow, Russia
Regime X-ray
Frequency 6 EHz
Bandpass 4.4-8.5 EHz
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection Cartesian
PixelScale 4'
Units Flux (milliCrabs), Exposure (s) and Significance
Coverage Galactic plane, |b| < 17.5 (30% of the sky)
NSurvey 9 [(Flux,Significance,Exposure) x 3 bands]
Resolution Gaussian 5'
Epoch December 2002 to January 2011
Reference Survey paper: Krivonos et al., 2012
Web site

Nine Year INTEGRAL IBIS 17-60 keV Galactic Plane Survey: Exposure

Short name[s] used to specify survey:INT GAL 17-60 Exp, INTGAL1760E

Description
This survey combines 9 years of INTEGRAL IBIS observations from December 2002 through January 2011 into a single Galactic Plane image. A total of 135 megaseconds of exposure is included in the observations used. Survey data is generated for the Galactic plane in the region |b| <= 17.5. The original flux data has been convolved with 5' seeing kernel. To minimize loss of resolution in transformations, the Lanczos sampler is suggested as the default, but may be overriden by the user. Both the preconvolved and standard convolved maps are available at the Web site.

The exposure and sensitivity vary considerably over the coverage region, but 90% of the field has a limiting sensitivity better than 2.2 x 10-11ergs s-1cm-2 or about 1.56 mCrab. Further details of the survey construction are given in the reference.

The flux and significance maps use the PSF convolved maps from the survey. The flux maps are in millicrab units. Exposure maps (with exposures in seconds) were from the exposure extension in the MAPDLD files and give the dead-time corrected exposure in seconds.

Links to the exposure and significance maps corresponding to the requested region will be given in the Web output. These maps can be generated directly in the CLI interface. For each waveband the flux, significance and exposure maps are available with just the end of the survey names distinguishing them (e.g., INT Gal 17-35 [Flux|Sig|Exp] or INTGal1735[F|S|E])

Provenance Krivonos et al., 2012
Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland and Spain), Poland, and participation of Russia and the USA.
Copyright Space Research Institute (IKI), Moscow, Russia
Regime X-ray
Frequency 8 EHz
Bandpass 4.4-14 EHz
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection Cartesian
PixelScale 4'
Units Flux (milliCrabs), Exposure (s) and Significance
Coverage Galactic plane, |b| < 17.5 (30% of the sky)
NSurvey 9 [(Flux,Significance,Exposure) x 3 bands]
Resolution Gaussian 5'
Epoch December 2002 to January 2011
Reference Survey paper: Krivonos et al., 2012
Web site

Nine Year INTEGRAL IBIS 17-60 keV Galactic Plane Survey: Flux

Short name[s] used to specify survey:INT GAL 17-60 Flux, INTGAL1760F

Description
This survey combines 9 years of INTEGRAL IBIS observations from December 2002 through January 2011 into a single Galactic Plane image. A total of 135 megaseconds of exposure is included in the observations used. Survey data is generated for the Galactic plane in the region |b| <= 17.5. The original flux data has been convolved with 5' seeing kernel. To minimize loss of resolution in transformations, the Lanczos sampler is suggested as the default, but may be overriden by the user. Both the preconvolved and standard convolved maps are available at the Web site.

The exposure and sensitivity vary considerably over the coverage region, but 90% of the field has a limiting sensitivity better than 2.2 x 10-11ergs s-1cm-2 or about 1.56 mCrab. Further details of the survey construction are given in the reference.

The flux and significance maps use the PSF convolved maps from the survey. The flux maps are in millicrab units. Exposure maps (with exposures in seconds) were from the exposure extension in the MAPDLD files and give the dead-time corrected exposure in seconds.

Links to the exposure and significance maps corresponding to the requested region will be given in the Web output. These maps can be generated directly in the CLI interface. For each waveband the flux, significance and exposure maps are available with just the end of the survey names distinguishing them (e.g., INT Gal 17-35 [Flux|Sig|Exp] or INTGal1735[F|S|E])

Provenance Krivonos et al., 2012
Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland and Spain), Poland, and participation of Russia and the USA.
Copyright Space Research Institute (IKI), Moscow, Russia
Regime X-ray
Frequency 8 EHz
Bandpass 4.4-14 EHz
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection Cartesian
PixelScale 4'
Units Flux (milliCrabs), Exposure (s) and Significance
Coverage Galactic plane, |b| < 17.5 (30% of the sky)
NSurvey 9 [(Flux,Significance,Exposure) x 3 bands]
Resolution Gaussian 5'
Epoch December 2002 to January 2011
Reference Survey paper: Krivonos et al., 2012
Web site

Nine Year INTEGRAL IBIS 17-60 keV Galactic Plane Survey: Significance

Short name[s] used to specify survey:INT GAL 17-60 Sig, INTGAL1760S

Description
This survey combines 9 years of INTEGRAL IBIS observations from December 2002 through January 2011 into a single Galactic Plane image. A total of 135 megaseconds of exposure is included in the observations used. Survey data is generated for the Galactic plane in the region |b| <= 17.5. The original flux data has been convolved with 5' seeing kernel. To minimize loss of resolution in transformations, the Lanczos sampler is suggested as the default, but may be overriden by the user. Both the preconvolved and standard convolved maps are available at the Web site.

The exposure and sensitivity vary considerably over the coverage region, but 90% of the field has a limiting sensitivity better than 2.2 x 10-11ergs s-1cm-2 or about 1.56 mCrab. Further details of the survey construction are given in the reference.

The flux and significance maps use the PSF convolved maps from the survey. The flux maps are in millicrab units. Exposure maps (with exposures in seconds) were from the exposure extension in the MAPDLD files and give the dead-time corrected exposure in seconds.

Links to the exposure and significance maps corresponding to the requested region will be given in the Web output. These maps can be generated directly in the CLI interface. For each waveband the flux, significance and exposure maps are available with just the end of the survey names distinguishing them (e.g., INT Gal 17-35 [Flux|Sig|Exp] or INTGal1735[F|S|E])

Provenance Krivonos et al., 2012
Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland and Spain), Poland, and participation of Russia and the USA.
Copyright Space Research Institute (IKI), Moscow, Russia
Regime X-ray
Frequency 8 EHz
Bandpass 4.4-14 EHz
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection Cartesian
PixelScale 4'
Units Flux (milliCrabs), Exposure (s) and Significance
Coverage Galactic plane, |b| < 17.5 (30% of the sky)
NSurvey 9 [(Flux,Significance,Exposure) x 3 bands]
Resolution Gaussian 5'
Epoch December 2002 to January 2011
Reference Survey paper: Krivonos et al., 2012
Web site

Nine Year INTEGRAL IBIS 35-80 keV Galactic Plane Survey: Exposure

Short name[s] used to specify survey:INT GAL 35-80 Exp, INTGAL3580E

Description
This survey combines 9 years of INTEGRAL IBIS observations from December 2002 through January 2011 into a single Galactic Plane image. A total of 135 megaseconds of exposure is included in the observations used. Survey data is generated for the Galactic plane in the region |b| <= 17.5. The original flux data has been convolved with 5' seeing kernel. To minimize loss of resolution in transformations, the Lanczos sampler is suggested as the default, but may be overriden by the user. Both the preconvolved and standard convolved maps are available at the Web site.

The exposure and sensitivity vary considerably over the coverage region, but 90% of the field has a limiting sensitivity better than 2.2 x 10-11ergs s-1cm-2 or about 1.56 mCrab. Further details of the survey construction are given in the reference.

The flux and significance maps use the PSF convolved maps from the survey. The flux maps are in millicrab units. Exposure maps (with exposures in seconds) were from the exposure extension in the MAPDLD files and give the dead-time corrected exposure in seconds.

Links to the exposure and significance maps corresponding to the requested region will be given in the Web output. These maps can be generated directly in the CLI interface. For each waveband the flux, significance and exposure maps are available with just the end of the survey names distinguishing them (e.g., INT Gal 17-35 [Flux|Sig|Exp] or INTGal1735[F|S|E])

Provenance Krivonos et al., 2012
Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland and Spain), Poland, and participation of Russia and the USA.
Copyright Space Research Institute (IKI), Moscow, Russia
Regime X-ray
Frequency 12 EHz
Bandpass 7.2-20 EHz
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection Cartesian
PixelScale 4'
Units Flux (milliCrabs), Exposure (s) and Significance
Coverage Galactic plane, |b| < 17.5 (30% of the sky)
NSurvey 9 [(Flux,Significance,Exposure) x 3 bands]
Resolution Gaussian 5'
Epoch December 2002 to January 2011
Reference Survey paper: Krivonos et al., 2012
Web site

Nine Year INTEGRAL IBIS 35-80 keV Galactic Plane Survey: Flux

Short name[s] used to specify survey:INT GAL 35-80 Flux, INTGAL3580F

Description
This survey combines 9 years of INTEGRAL IBIS observations from December 2002 through January 2011 into a single Galactic Plane image. A total of 135 megaseconds of exposure is included in the observations used. Survey data is generated for the Galactic plane in the region |b| <= 17.5. The original flux data has been convolved with 5' seeing kernel. To minimize loss of resolution in transformations, the Lanczos sampler is suggested as the default, but may be overriden by the user. Both the preconvolved and standard convolved maps are available at the Web site.

The exposure and sensitivity vary considerably over the coverage region, but 90% of the field has a limiting sensitivity better than 2.2 x 10-11ergs s-1cm-2 or about 1.56 mCrab. Further details of the survey construction are given in the reference.

The flux and significance maps use the PSF convolved maps from the survey. The flux maps are in millicrab units. Exposure maps (with exposures in seconds) were from the exposure extension in the MAPDLD files and give the dead-time corrected exposure in seconds.

Links to the exposure and significance maps corresponding to the requested region will be given in the Web output. These maps can be generated directly in the CLI interface. For each waveband the flux, significance and exposure maps are available with just the end of the survey names distinguishing them (e.g., INT Gal 17-35 [Flux|Sig|Exp] or INTGal1735[F|S|E])

Provenance Krivonos et al., 2012
Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland and Spain), Poland, and participation of Russia and the USA.
Copyright Space Research Institute (IKI), Moscow, Russia
Regime X-ray
Frequency 12 EHz
Bandpass 7.2-20 EHz
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection Cartesian
PixelScale 4'
Units Flux (milliCrabs), Exposure (s) and Significance
Coverage Galactic plane, |b| < 17.5 (30% of the sky)
NSurvey 9 [(Flux,Significance,Exposure) x 3 bands]
Resolution Gaussian 5'
Epoch December 2002 to January 2011
Reference Survey paper: Krivonos et al., 2012
Web site

Nine Year INTEGRAL IBIS 35-80 keV Galactic Plane Survey: Significance

Short name[s] used to specify survey:INT GAL 35-80 Sig, INTGAL3580S

Description
This survey combines 9 years of INTEGRAL IBIS observations from December 2002 through January 2011 into a single Galactic Plane image. A total of 135 megaseconds of exposure is included in the observations used. Survey data is generated for the Galactic plane in the region |b| <= 17.5. The original flux data has been convolved with 5' seeing kernel. To minimize loss of resolution in transformations, the Lanczos sampler is suggested as the default, but may be overriden by the user. Both the preconvolved and standard convolved maps are available at the Web site.

The exposure and sensitivity vary considerably over the coverage region, but 90% of the field has a limiting sensitivity better than 2.2 x 10-11ergs s-1cm-2 or about 1.56 mCrab. Further details of the survey construction are given in the reference.

The flux and significance maps use the PSF convolved maps from the survey. The flux maps are in millicrab units. Exposure maps (with exposures in seconds) were from the exposure extension in the MAPDLD files and give the dead-time corrected exposure in seconds.

Links to the exposure and significance maps corresponding to the requested region will be given in the Web output. These maps can be generated directly in the CLI interface. For each waveband the flux, significance and exposure maps are available with just the end of the survey names distinguishing them (e.g., INT Gal 17-35 [Flux|Sig|Exp] or INTGal1735[F|S|E])

Provenance Krivonos et al., 2012
Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland and Spain), Poland, and participation of Russia and the USA.
Copyright Space Research Institute (IKI), Moscow, Russia
Regime X-ray
Frequency 12 EHz
Bandpass 7.2-20 EHz
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection Cartesian
PixelScale 4'
Units Flux (milliCrabs), Exposure (s) and Significance
Coverage Galactic plane, |b| < 17.5 (30% of the sky)
NSurvey 9 [(Flux,Significance,Exposure) x 3 bands]
Resolution Gaussian 5'
Epoch December 2002 to January 2011
Reference Survey paper: Krivonos et al., 2012
Web site

PSPC summed pointed observations, 1 degree cutoff, Counts

Short name[s] used to specify survey:PSPC1Cnt, PSPC 1.0 Deg-Cnt, PSPC 1.0 Deg-Counts

Description
The ROSAT PSPC surveys were generated by SkyView as mosaics from publically available PSPC observations. The surveys include all data available through March 1, 1997. This includes the vast majority of ROSAT PSPC observations. Filter observations and observations taken during the verification phase in 1991 were not included in either set. The details of the generation of the surveys are discussed in a companion document. Basically the counts and exposure from all observations were added and then an intensity map was generated as the ratio of the two.

The smaller cut-offs allow users to distinguish point sources in fields where a bright source may have been towards the edge of one observation and near the center of another. In these cases the source appears fuzzy due to the poor resolution of ROSAT near the edge of the field of view. This comes at the cost of a substantial reduction in the fraction of the sky covered. Counts and exposure maps are included for users who may need this information (e.g., to do statistical analysis).

The global organization of the surveys is similar to the IRAS survey. Each map covers an area of 2.5°x2.5° with a minimum overlap of 0.25°. To cover the entire sky would require over 10,000 maps. However due to lack of coverage only approximately 4000-6000 maps are actually populated. Users asking for reqions where there is no ROSAT coverage may get a blank region returned.

Detailed information regarding the creation of the ROSAT suveys can be found in the ROSAT PSPC Generation Document.

Provenance Observational data from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, mosaicking of images done by SkyView.
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 1
Frequency 240 PHz
Bandpass 24-580 PHz
Coverage Isolated pointings in the sky. Total coverage < 14%
PixelScale 15"
PixelUnits cts/s/pixel
Resolution 30" but variable across the field of view
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1991-1994
Reference ROSAT Mission Description and Data Products Guide, available through the ROSAT Guest Observer Facility, NASA GSFC.
SkyView Rosat Survey Generation description.

PSPC summed pointed observations, 1 degree cutoff, Exposure

Short name[s] used to specify survey:PSPC1Exp, PSPC 1.0 Deg-Exp, PSPC 1.0 Deg-Expos

Description
The ROSAT PSPC surveys were generated by SkyView as mosaics from publically available PSPC observations. The surveys include all data available through March 1, 1997. This includes the vast majority of ROSAT PSPC observations. Filter observations and observations taken during the verification phase in 1991 were not included in either set. The details of the generation of the surveys are discussed in a companion document. Basically the counts and exposure from all observations were added and then an intensity map was generated as the ratio of the two.

The smaller cut-offs allow users to distinguish point sources in fields where a bright source may have been towards the edge of one observation and near the center of another. In these cases the source appears fuzzy due to the poor resolution of ROSAT near the edge of the field of view. This comes at the cost of a substantial reduction in the fraction of the sky covered. Counts and exposure maps are included for users who may need this information (e.g., to do statistical analysis).

The global organization of the surveys is similar to the IRAS survey. Each map covers an area of 2.5°x2.5° with a minimum overlap of 0.25°. To cover the entire sky would require over 10,000 maps. However due to lack of coverage only approximately 4000-6000 maps are actually populated. Users asking for reqions where there is no ROSAT coverage may get a blank region returned.

Detailed information regarding the creation of the ROSAT suveys can be found in the ROSAT PSPC Generation Document.

Provenance Observational data from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, mosaicking of images done by SkyView.
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 1
Frequency 240 PHz
Bandpass 24-580 PHz
Coverage Isolated pointings in the sky. Total coverage < 14%
PixelScale 15"
PixelUnits cts/s/pixel
Resolution 30" but variable across the field of view
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1991-1994
Reference ROSAT Mission Description and Data Products Guide, available through the ROSAT Guest Observer Facility, NASA GSFC.
SkyView Rosat Survey Generation description.

PSPC summed pointed observations, 1 degree cutoff, Intensity

Short name[s] used to specify survey:PSPC1Int, PSPC 1.0 Deg-Int, PSPC 1.0 Deg-Inten

Description
The ROSAT PSPC surveys were generated by SkyView as mosaics from publically available PSPC observations. The surveys include all data available through March 1, 1997. This includes the vast majority of ROSAT PSPC observations. Filter observations and observations taken during the verification phase in 1991 were not included in either set. The details of the generation of the surveys are discussed in a companion document. Basically the counts and exposure from all observations were added and then an intensity map was generated as the ratio of the two.

The smaller cut-offs allow users to distinguish point sources in fields where a bright source may have been towards the edge of one observation and near the center of another. In these cases the source appears fuzzy due to the poor resolution of ROSAT near the edge of the field of view. This comes at the cost of a substantial reduction in the fraction of the sky covered. Counts and exposure maps are included for users who may need this information (e.g., to do statistical analysis).

The global organization of the surveys is similar to the IRAS survey. Each map covers an area of 2.5°x2.5° with a minimum overlap of 0.25°. To cover the entire sky would require over 10,000 maps. However due to lack of coverage only approximately 4000-6000 maps are actually populated. Users asking for reqions where there is no ROSAT coverage may get a blank region returned.

Detailed information regarding the creation of the ROSAT suveys can be found in the ROSAT PSPC Generation Document.

Provenance Observational data from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, mosaicking of images done by SkyView.
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 1
Frequency 240 PHz
Bandpass 24-580 PHz
Coverage Isolated pointings in the sky. Total coverage < 14%
PixelScale 15"
PixelUnits cts/s/pixel
Resolution 30" but variable across the field of view
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1991-1994
Reference ROSAT Mission Description and Data Products Guide, available through the ROSAT Guest Observer Facility, NASA GSFC.
SkyView Rosat Survey Generation description.

PSPC summed pointed observations, 2 degree cutoff, Counts

Short name[s] used to specify survey:PSPC2Cnt, PSPC 2.0 Deg-Cnt, PSPC 2.0 Deg-Counts

Description
The ROSAT PSPC surveys were generated by SkyView as mosaics from publically available PSPC observations. The surveys include all data available through March 1, 1997. This includes the vast majority of ROSAT PSPC observations. Filter observations and observations taken during the verification phase in 1991 were not included in either set. The details of the generation of the surveys are discussed in a companion document. Basically the counts and exposure from all observations were added and then an intensity map was generated as the ratio of the two.

The smaller cut-offs allow users to distinguish point sources in fields where a bright source may have been towards the edge of one observation and near the center of another. In these cases the source appears fuzzy due to the poor resolution of ROSAT near the edge of the field of view. This comes at the cost of a substantial reduction in the fraction of the sky covered. Counts and exposure maps are included for users who may need this information (e.g., to do statistical analysis).

The global organization of the surveys is similar to the IRAS survey. Each map covers an area of 2.5°x2.5° with a minimum overlap of 0.25°. To cover the entire sky would require over 10,000 maps. However due to lack of coverage only approximately 4000-6000 maps are actually populated. Users asking for reqions where there is no ROSAT coverage may get a blank region returned.

Detailed information regarding the creation of the ROSAT suveys can be found in the ROSAT PSPC Generation Document.

Provenance Observational data from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, mosaicking of images done by SkyView.
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 1
Frequency 240 PHz
Bandpass 24-580 PHz
Coverage Isolated pointings in the sky. Total coverage < 14%
PixelScale 15"
PixelUnits cts/s/pixel
Resolution 30" but variable across the field of view
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1991-1994
Reference ROSAT Mission Description and Data Products Guide, available through the ROSAT Guest Observer Facility, NASA GSFC.
SkyView Rosat Survey Generation description.

PSPC summed pointed observations, 2 degree cutoff, Exposure

Short name[s] used to specify survey:PSPC2Exp, PSPC 2.0 Deg-Exp, PSPC 2.0 Deg-Expos

Description
The ROSAT PSPC surveys were generated by SkyView as mosaics from publically available PSPC observations. The surveys include all data available through March 1, 1997. This includes the vast majority of ROSAT PSPC observations. Filter observations and observations taken during the verification phase in 1991 were not included in either set. The details of the generation of the surveys are discussed in a companion document. Basically the counts and exposure from all observations were added and then an intensity map was generated as the ratio of the two.

The smaller cut-offs allow users to distinguish point sources in fields where a bright source may have been towards the edge of one observation and near the center of another. In these cases the source appears fuzzy due to the poor resolution of ROSAT near the edge of the field of view. This comes at the cost of a substantial reduction in the fraction of the sky covered. Counts and exposure maps are included for users who may need this information (e.g., to do statistical analysis).

The global organization of the surveys is similar to the IRAS survey. Each map covers an area of 2.5°x2.5° with a minimum overlap of 0.25°. To cover the entire sky would require over 10,000 maps. However due to lack of coverage only approximately 4000-6000 maps are actually populated. Users asking for reqions where there is no ROSAT coverage may get a blank region returned.

Detailed information regarding the creation of the ROSAT suveys can be found in the ROSAT PSPC Generation Document.

Provenance Observational data from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, mosaicking of images done by SkyView.
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 1
Frequency 240 PHz
Bandpass 24-580 PHz
Coverage Isolated pointings in the sky. Total coverage < 14%
PixelScale 15"
PixelUnits cts/s/pixel
Resolution 30" but variable across the field of view
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1991-1994
Reference ROSAT Mission Description and Data Products Guide, available through the ROSAT Guest Observer Facility, NASA GSFC.
SkyView Rosat Survey Generation description.

PSPC summed pointed observations, 2 degree cutoff, Intensity

Short name[s] used to specify survey:PSPC2Int, PSPC 2.0 Deg-Int, PSPC 2.0 Deg-Inten

Description
The ROSAT PSPC surveys were generated by SkyView as mosaics from publically available PSPC observations. The surveys include all data available through March 1, 1997. This includes the vast majority of ROSAT PSPC observations. Filter observations and observations taken during the verification phase in 1991 were not included in either set. The details of the generation of the surveys are discussed in a companion document. Basically the counts and exposure from all observations were added and then an intensity map was generated as the ratio of the two.

The smaller cut-offs allow users to distinguish point sources in fields where a bright source may have been towards the edge of one observation and near the center of another. In these cases the source appears fuzzy due to the poor resolution of ROSAT near the edge of the field of view. This comes at the cost of a substantial reduction in the fraction of the sky covered. Counts and exposure maps are included for users who may need this information (e.g., to do statistical analysis).

The global organization of the surveys is similar to the IRAS survey. Each map covers an area of 2.5°x2.5° with a minimum overlap of 0.25°. To cover the entire sky would require over 10,000 maps. However due to lack of coverage only approximately 4000-6000 maps are actually populated. Users asking for reqions where there is no ROSAT coverage may get a blank region returned.

Detailed information regarding the creation of the ROSAT suveys can be found in the ROSAT PSPC Generation Document.

Provenance Observational data from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, mosaicking of images done by SkyView.
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 1
Frequency 240 PHz
Bandpass 24-580 PHz
Coverage Isolated pointings in the sky. Total coverage < 14%
PixelScale 15"
PixelUnits cts/s/pixel
Resolution 30" but variable across the field of view
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1991-1994
Reference ROSAT Mission Description and Data Products Guide, available through the ROSAT Guest Observer Facility, NASA GSFC.
SkyView Rosat Survey Generation description.

PSPC summed pointed observations, 0.6 degree cutoff, Counts

Short name[s] used to specify survey:PSPC0.6Cnt, PSPC 0.6 Deg-Cnt, PSPC 0.6 Deg-Counts

Description
The ROSAT PSPC surveys were generated by SkyView as mosaics from publically available PSPC observations. The surveys include all data available through March 1, 1997. This includes the vast majority of ROSAT PSPC observations. Filter observations and observations taken during the verification phase in 1991 were not included in either set. The details of the generation of the surveys are discussed in a companion document. Basically the counts and exposure from all observations were added and then an intensity map was generated as the ratio of the two.

The smaller cut-offs allow users to distinguish point sources in fields where a bright source may have been towards the edge of one observation and near the center of another. In these cases the source appears fuzzy due to the poor resolution of ROSAT near the edge of the field of view. This comes at the cost of a substantial reduction in the fraction of the sky covered. Counts and exposure maps are included for users who may need this information (e.g., to do statistical analysis).

The global organization of the surveys is similar to the IRAS survey. Each map covers an area of 2.5°x2.5° with a minimum overlap of 0.25°. To cover the entire sky would require over 10,000 maps. However due to lack of coverage only approximately 4000-6000 maps are actually populated. Users asking for reqions where there is no ROSAT coverage may get a blank region returned.

Detailed information regarding the creation of the ROSAT suveys can be found in the ROSAT PSPC Generation Document.

Provenance Observational data from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, mosaicking of images done by SkyView.
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 1
Frequency 240 PHz
Bandpass 24-580 PHz
Coverage Isolated pointings in the sky. Total coverage < 14%
PixelScale 15"
PixelUnits cts/s/pixel
Resolution 30" but variable across the field of view
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1991-1994
Reference ROSAT Mission Description and Data Products Guide, available through the ROSAT Guest Observer Facility, NASA GSFC.
SkyView Rosat Survey Generation description.

PSPC summed pointed observations, 0.6 degree cutoff, Exposure

Short name[s] used to specify survey:PSPC0.6Exp, PSPC 0.6 Deg-Exp, PSPC 0.6 Deg-Expos

Description
The ROSAT PSPC surveys were generated by SkyView as mosaics from publically available PSPC observations. The surveys include all data available through March 1, 1997. This includes the vast majority of ROSAT PSPC observations. Filter observations and observations taken during the verification phase in 1991 were not included in either set. The details of the generation of the surveys are discussed in a companion document. Basically the counts and exposure from all observations were added and then an intensity map was generated as the ratio of the two.

The smaller cut-offs allow users to distinguish point sources in fields where a bright source may have been towards the edge of one observation and near the center of another. In these cases the source appears fuzzy due to the poor resolution of ROSAT near the edge of the field of view. This comes at the cost of a substantial reduction in the fraction of the sky covered. Counts and exposure maps are included for users who may need this information (e.g., to do statistical analysis).

The global organization of the surveys is similar to the IRAS survey. Each map covers an area of 2.5°x2.5° with a minimum overlap of 0.25°. To cover the entire sky would require over 10,000 maps. However due to lack of coverage only approximately 4000-6000 maps are actually populated. Users asking for reqions where there is no ROSAT coverage may get a blank region returned.

Detailed information regarding the creation of the ROSAT suveys can be found in the ROSAT PSPC Generation Document.

Provenance Observational data from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, mosaicking of images done by SkyView.
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 1
Frequency 240 PHz
Bandpass 24-580 PHz
Coverage Isolated pointings in the sky. Total coverage < 14%
PixelScale 15"
PixelUnits cts/s/pixel
Resolution 30" but variable across the field of view
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1991-1994
Reference ROSAT Mission Description and Data Products Guide, available through the ROSAT Guest Observer Facility, NASA GSFC.
SkyView Rosat Survey Generation description.

PSPC summed pointed observations, 0.6 degree cutoff, Intensity

Short name[s] used to specify survey:PSPC0.6Int, PSPC 0.6 Deg-Int, PSPC 0.6 Deg-Inten

Description
The ROSAT PSPC surveys were generated by SkyView as mosaics from publically available PSPC observations. The surveys include all data available through March 1, 1997. This includes the vast majority of ROSAT PSPC observations. Filter observations and observations taken during the verification phase in 1991 were not included in either set. The details of the generation of the surveys are discussed in a companion document. Basically the counts and exposure from all observations were added and then an intensity map was generated as the ratio of the two.

The smaller cut-offs allow users to distinguish point sources in fields where a bright source may have been towards the edge of one observation and near the center of another. In these cases the source appears fuzzy due to the poor resolution of ROSAT near the edge of the field of view. This comes at the cost of a substantial reduction in the fraction of the sky covered. Counts and exposure maps are included for users who may need this information (e.g., to do statistical analysis).

The global organization of the surveys is similar to the IRAS survey. Each map covers an area of 2.5°x2.5° with a minimum overlap of 0.25°. To cover the entire sky would require over 10,000 maps. However due to lack of coverage only approximately 4000-6000 maps are actually populated. Users asking for reqions where there is no ROSAT coverage may get a blank region returned.

Detailed information regarding the creation of the ROSAT suveys can be found in the ROSAT PSPC Generation Document.

Provenance Observational data from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, mosaicking of images done by SkyView.
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 1
Frequency 240 PHz
Bandpass 24-580 PHz
Coverage Isolated pointings in the sky. Total coverage < 14%
PixelScale 15"
PixelUnits cts/s/pixel
Resolution 30" but variable across the field of view
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1991-1994
Reference ROSAT Mission Description and Data Products Guide, available through the ROSAT Guest Observer Facility, NASA GSFC.
SkyView Rosat Survey Generation description.

ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey Hard Band: Counts

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RASShbC, RASSCnt hb, RASS-Cnt Hard ,RASS Hard, RASS3hb, RASShb

Description
The ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey was obtained during 1990/1991 using the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) in combination with the ROSAT X-ray Telescope (XRT). More than 60,000 X-ray sources were detected during this time.

SkyView has multiple surveys derived from the RASS data. The surveys whose RASS are counts and exposure maps from the survey. Previously The RASSBCK maps have had the point sources removed to show the diffuse X-ray background and are presended at lower resolution.

The full-resolution RASS surveys data are organized in 1378 fields each 6.4° x 6.4° covering the whole sky. Neighboring fields overlap by at least 0.23°.

Three bands are available through SkyView

  • broad band (0.1-2.4 keV)
  • hard band (0.5-2.0 keV)
  • soft band (0.1-0.4 keV)
Data was dowloaded from the MPE FTP site.

The intensity maps are created from the exposure maps using the single exposure map available which is appropriate for the broad band images, so the intensities of the hard and soft bands are only approximate.

Provenance Max Planck Institute for Exterrestrial Physics (Garching FRG)
Copyright MPE but data may be used for scientific purposes so long as appropriate reference is included.
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 6
Frequency 240 PHz
Bandpass 120-480 PHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 45"
PixelUnits Counts,Flux
Resolution
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1990-07 to 1991-02, 1991-98
Reference The ROSAT All-Sky Survey (ADS)

ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey Broad Band: Counts

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RASSbbC, RASSCnt bb, RASS-Cnt Broad ,RASS Broad, RASS3bb, RASSbb ,RASS

Description
The ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey was obtained during 1990/1991 using the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) in combination with the ROSAT X-ray Telescope (XRT). More than 60,000 X-ray sources were detected during this time.

SkyView has multiple surveys derived from the RASS data. The surveys whose RASS are counts and exposure maps from the survey. Previously The RASSBCK maps have had the point sources removed to show the diffuse X-ray background and are presended at lower resolution.

The full-resolution RASS surveys data are organized in 1378 fields each 6.4° x 6.4° covering the whole sky. Neighboring fields overlap by at least 0.23°.

Three bands are available through SkyView

  • broad band (0.1-2.4 keV)
  • hard band (0.5-2.0 keV)
  • soft band (0.1-0.4 keV)
Data was dowloaded from the MPE FTP site.

The intensity maps are created from the exposure maps using the single exposure map available which is appropriate for the broad band images, so the intensities of the hard and soft bands are only approximate.

Provenance Max Planck Institute for Exterrestrial Physics (Garching FRG)
Copyright MPE but data may be used for scientific purposes so long as appropriate reference is included.
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 6
Frequency 240 PHz
Bandpass 24-580 PHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 45"
PixelUnits Counts,Flux
Resolution
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1990-07 to 1991-02, 1991-98
Reference The ROSAT All-Sky Survey (ADS)

ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey Soft Band: Counts

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RASSsbC, RASSCnt sb, RASS-Cnt Soft ,RASS Soft, RASS3sb, RASSsb

Description
The ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey was obtained during 1990/1991 using the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) in combination with the ROSAT X-ray Telescope (XRT). More than 60,000 X-ray sources were detected during this time.

SkyView has multiple surveys derived from the RASS data. The surveys whose RASS are counts and exposure maps from the survey. Previously The RASSBCK maps have had the point sources removed to show the diffuse X-ray background and are presended at lower resolution.

The full-resolution RASS surveys data are organized in 1378 fields each 6.4° x 6.4° covering the whole sky. Neighboring fields overlap by at least 0.23°.

Three bands are available through SkyView

  • broad band (0.1-2.4 keV)
  • hard band (0.5-2.0 keV)
  • soft band (0.1-0.4 keV)
Data was dowloaded from the MPE FTP site.

The intensity maps are created from the exposure maps using the single exposure map available which is appropriate for the broad band images, so the intensities of the hard and soft bands are only approximate.

Provenance Max Planck Institute for Exterrestrial Physics (Garching FRG)
Copyright MPE but data may be used for scientific purposes so long as appropriate reference is included.
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 6
Frequency 73 PHz
Bandpass 24-120 PHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 45"
PixelUnits Counts,Flux
Resolution
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1990-07 to 1991-02, 1991-98
Reference The ROSAT All-Sky Survey (ADS)

ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey Hard Band: Intensity

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RASShbI, RASSInt hb, RASS-Int Hard

Description
The ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey was obtained during 1990/1991 using the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) in combination with the ROSAT X-ray Telescope (XRT). More than 60,000 X-ray sources were detected during this time.

SkyView has multiple surveys derived from the RASS data. The surveys whose RASS are counts and exposure maps from the survey. Previously The RASSBCK maps have had the point sources removed to show the diffuse X-ray background and are presended at lower resolution.

The full-resolution RASS surveys data are organized in 1378 fields each 6.4° x 6.4° covering the whole sky. Neighboring fields overlap by at least 0.23°.

Three bands are available through SkyView

  • broad band (0.1-2.4 keV)
  • hard band (0.5-2.0 keV)
  • soft band (0.1-0.4 keV)
Data was dowloaded from the MPE FTP site.

The intensity maps are created from the exposure maps using the single exposure map available which is appropriate for the broad band images, so the intensities of the hard and soft bands are only approximate.

Provenance Max Planck Institute for Exterrestrial Physics (Garching FRG)
Copyright MPE but data may be used for scientific purposes so long as appropriate reference is included.
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 6
Frequency 240 PHz
Bandpass 120-480 PHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 45"
PixelUnits Counts,Flux
Resolution
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1990-07 to 1991-02, 1991-98
Reference The ROSAT All-Sky Survey (ADS)

ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey Broad Band: Intensity

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RASSbbI, RASSInt bb, RASS-Int Broad

Description
The ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey was obtained during 1990/1991 using the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) in combination with the ROSAT X-ray Telescope (XRT). More than 60,000 X-ray sources were detected during this time.

SkyView has multiple surveys derived from the RASS data. The surveys whose RASS are counts and exposure maps from the survey. Previously The RASSBCK maps have had the point sources removed to show the diffuse X-ray background and are presended at lower resolution.

The full-resolution RASS surveys data are organized in 1378 fields each 6.4° x 6.4° covering the whole sky. Neighboring fields overlap by at least 0.23°.

Three bands are available through SkyView

  • broad band (0.1-2.4 keV)
  • hard band (0.5-2.0 keV)
  • soft band (0.1-0.4 keV)
Data was dowloaded from the MPE FTP site.

The intensity maps are created from the exposure maps using the single exposure map available which is appropriate for the broad band images, so the intensities of the hard and soft bands are only approximate.

Provenance Max Planck Institute for Exterrestrial Physics (Garching FRG)
Copyright MPE but data may be used for scientific purposes so long as appropriate reference is included.
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 6
Frequency 240 PHz
Bandpass 24-580 PHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 45"
PixelUnits Counts,Flux
Resolution
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1990-07 to 1991-02, 1991-98
Reference The ROSAT All-Sky Survey (ADS)

ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey Soft Band: Intensity

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RASSsbI, RASSInt sb, RASS-Int Soft

Description
The ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Survey was obtained during 1990/1991 using the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) in combination with the ROSAT X-ray Telescope (XRT). More than 60,000 X-ray sources were detected during this time.

SkyView has multiple surveys derived from the RASS data. The surveys whose RASS are counts and exposure maps from the survey. Previously The RASSBCK maps have had the point sources removed to show the diffuse X-ray background and are presended at lower resolution.

The full-resolution RASS surveys data are organized in 1378 fields each 6.4° x 6.4° covering the whole sky. Neighboring fields overlap by at least 0.23°.

Three bands are available through SkyView

  • broad band (0.1-2.4 keV)
  • hard band (0.5-2.0 keV)
  • soft band (0.1-0.4 keV)
Data was dowloaded from the MPE FTP site.

The intensity maps are created from the exposure maps using the single exposure map available which is appropriate for the broad band images, so the intensities of the hard and soft bands are only approximate.

Provenance Max Planck Institute for Exterrestrial Physics (Garching FRG)
Copyright MPE but data may be used for scientific purposes so long as appropriate reference is included.
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 6
Frequency 73 PHz
Bandpass 24-120 PHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 45"
PixelUnits Counts,Flux
Resolution
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1990-07 to 1991-02, 1991-98
Reference The ROSAT All-Sky Survey (ADS)

ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Background Survey: Band 1

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RASSBck1,rassback1,RASS Background 1

Description
These maps present maps of ROSAT soft X-ray all-sky survey as presented in Snowden et al, ApJ 485, 125 (1997). The maps cover approximately 98% of the sky. These maps have had all point sources removed These surveys supercede the RASS0.25, RASS0.75 and RASS1.5 Kev surveys previously provided. Those surveys may still be invoked in SkyView using batch and jar tools but are not accessible on the Web page.

The seven maps correspond to ranges in the pulse height analysis of the photons detected. Since the energy resolution of the PSPC is poor, there is consider overlap between adjacent bands.

The energy range for the bands corresponds to:
BandEnergy range (keV)
Band 10.11 - 0.284
Band 20.14 - 0.284
Band 30.2 - 0.83
Band 40.44 - 1.01
Band 50.56 - 1.21
Band 60.73 - 1.56
Band 71.05 - 2.04
Note the substantial overlap between bands. Each photon detected is assigned to a band based on the pulse height analysis for that photon, but the energy resolution of the detectors is relatively poor. Also note that Band 3 was not included in the reference paper due to poor statistics and background modeling.

SkyView has several other sets of surveys derived from ROSAT data with substantially higher resolution and which include point sources. The RASS surveys are derived from the RASS all sky survey. These include count and intensity maps. The PSPC maps are dervived from the PSPC pointed observations which were combined by SkyView. The HRI survey is derived from a similar mosaicking of all HRI observations.

Provenance Max Planck Institute for Exterrestrial Physics (Garching FRG)
Copyright MPI but data may be used for scientific purposes so long as appropriate reference is included.
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 6
Frequency 41 PHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.2
PixelUnits 10-6counts/s
Resolution ca. 2°
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 1990-07 to 1991-02, 1991-8
Reference S.L. Snowden, et al., Ap,J, Vol.485 (1997), pp.125

ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Background Survey: Band 2

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RASSBck2,rassback2,RASS Background 2

Description
These maps present maps of ROSAT soft X-ray all-sky survey as presented in Snowden et al, ApJ 485, 125 (1997). The maps cover approximately 98% of the sky. These maps have had all point sources removed These surveys supercede the RASS0.25, RASS0.75 and RASS1.5 Kev surveys previously provided. Those surveys may still be invoked in SkyView using batch and jar tools but are not accessible on the Web page.

The seven maps correspond to ranges in the pulse height analysis of the photons detected. Since the energy resolution of the PSPC is poor, there is consider overlap between adjacent bands.

The energy range for the bands corresponds to:
BandEnergy range (keV)
Band 10.11 - 0.284
Band 20.14 - 0.284
Band 30.2 - 0.83
Band 40.44 - 1.01
Band 50.56 - 1.21
Band 60.73 - 1.56
Band 71.05 - 2.04
Note the substantial overlap between bands. Each photon detected is assigned to a band based on the pulse height analysis for that photon, but the energy resolution of the detectors is relatively poor. Also note that Band 3 was not included in the reference paper due to poor statistics and background modeling.

SkyView has several other sets of surveys derived from ROSAT data with substantially higher resolution and which include point sources. The RASS surveys are derived from the RASS all sky survey. These include count and intensity maps. The PSPC maps are dervived from the PSPC pointed observations which were combined by SkyView. The HRI survey is derived from a similar mosaicking of all HRI observations.

Provenance Max Planck Institute for Exterrestrial Physics (Garching FRG)
Copyright MPI but data may be used for scientific purposes so long as appropriate reference is included.
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 6
Frequency 51 PHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.2
PixelUnits 10-6counts/s
Resolution ca. 2°
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 1990-07 to 1991-02, 1991-8
Reference S.L. Snowden, et al., Ap,J, Vol.485 (1997), pp.125

ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Background Survey: Band 3

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RASSBck3,rassback3,RASS Background 3

Description
These maps present maps of ROSAT soft X-ray all-sky survey as presented in Snowden et al, ApJ 485, 125 (1997). The maps cover approximately 98% of the sky. These maps have had all point sources removed These surveys supercede the RASS0.25, RASS0.75 and RASS1.5 Kev surveys previously provided. Those surveys may still be invoked in SkyView using batch and jar tools but are not accessible on the Web page.

The seven maps correspond to ranges in the pulse height analysis of the photons detected. Since the energy resolution of the PSPC is poor, there is consider overlap between adjacent bands.

The energy range for the bands corresponds to:
BandEnergy range (keV)
Band 10.11 - 0.284
Band 20.14 - 0.284
Band 30.2 - 0.83
Band 40.44 - 1.01
Band 50.56 - 1.21
Band 60.73 - 1.56
Band 71.05 - 2.04
Note the substantial overlap between bands. Each photon detected is assigned to a band based on the pulse height analysis for that photon, but the energy resolution of the detectors is relatively poor. Also note that Band 3 was not included in the reference paper due to poor statistics and background modeling.

SkyView has several other sets of surveys derived from ROSAT data with substantially higher resolution and which include point sources. The RASS surveys are derived from the RASS all sky survey. These include count and intensity maps. The PSPC maps are dervived from the PSPC pointed observations which were combined by SkyView. The HRI survey is derived from a similar mosaicking of all HRI observations.

Provenance Max Planck Institute for Exterrestrial Physics (Garching FRG)
Copyright MPI but data may be used for scientific purposes so long as appropriate reference is included.
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 6
Frequency 100 PHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.2
PixelUnits 10-6counts/s
Resolution ca. 2°
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 1990-07 to 1991-02, 1991-8
Reference S.L. Snowden, et al., Ap,J, Vol.485 (1997), pp.125

ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Background Survey: Band 4

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RASSBck4,rassback4,RASS Background 4

Description
These maps present maps of ROSAT soft X-ray all-sky survey as presented in Snowden et al, ApJ 485, 125 (1997). The maps cover approximately 98% of the sky. These maps have had all point sources removed These surveys supercede the RASS0.25, RASS0.75 and RASS1.5 Kev surveys previously provided. Those surveys may still be invoked in SkyView using batch and jar tools but are not accessible on the Web page.

The seven maps correspond to ranges in the pulse height analysis of the photons detected. Since the energy resolution of the PSPC is poor, there is consider overlap between adjacent bands.

The energy range for the bands corresponds to:
BandEnergy range (keV)
Band 10.11 - 0.284
Band 20.14 - 0.284
Band 30.2 - 0.83
Band 40.44 - 1.01
Band 50.56 - 1.21
Band 60.73 - 1.56
Band 71.05 - 2.04
Note the substantial overlap between bands. Each photon detected is assigned to a band based on the pulse height analysis for that photon, but the energy resolution of the detectors is relatively poor. Also note that Band 3 was not included in the reference paper due to poor statistics and background modeling.

SkyView has several other sets of surveys derived from ROSAT data with substantially higher resolution and which include point sources. The RASS surveys are derived from the RASS all sky survey. These include count and intensity maps. The PSPC maps are dervived from the PSPC pointed observations which were combined by SkyView. The HRI survey is derived from a similar mosaicking of all HRI observations.

Provenance Max Planck Institute for Exterrestrial Physics (Garching FRG)
Copyright MPI but data may be used for scientific purposes so long as appropriate reference is included.
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 6
Frequency 170 PHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.2
PixelUnits 10-6counts/s
Resolution ca. 2°
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 1990-07 to 1991-02, 1991-8
Reference S.L. Snowden, et al., Ap,J, Vol.485 (1997), pp.125

ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Background Survey: Band 5

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RASSBck5,rassback5,RASS Background 5

Description
These maps present maps of ROSAT soft X-ray all-sky survey as presented in Snowden et al, ApJ 485, 125 (1997). The maps cover approximately 98% of the sky. These maps have had all point sources removed These surveys supercede the RASS0.25, RASS0.75 and RASS1.5 Kev surveys previously provided. Those surveys may still be invoked in SkyView using batch and jar tools but are not accessible on the Web page.

The seven maps correspond to ranges in the pulse height analysis of the photons detected. Since the energy resolution of the PSPC is poor, there is consider overlap between adjacent bands.

The energy range for the bands corresponds to:
BandEnergy range (keV)
Band 10.11 - 0.284
Band 20.14 - 0.284
Band 30.2 - 0.83
Band 40.44 - 1.01
Band 50.56 - 1.21
Band 60.73 - 1.56
Band 71.05 - 2.04
Note the substantial overlap between bands. Each photon detected is assigned to a band based on the pulse height analysis for that photon, but the energy resolution of the detectors is relatively poor. Also note that Band 3 was not included in the reference paper due to poor statistics and background modeling.

SkyView has several other sets of surveys derived from ROSAT data with substantially higher resolution and which include point sources. The RASS surveys are derived from the RASS all sky survey. These include count and intensity maps. The PSPC maps are dervived from the PSPC pointed observations which were combined by SkyView. The HRI survey is derived from a similar mosaicking of all HRI observations.

Provenance Max Planck Institute for Exterrestrial Physics (Garching FRG)
Copyright MPI but data may be used for scientific purposes so long as appropriate reference is included.
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 6
Frequency 190 PHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.2
PixelUnits 10-6counts/s
Resolution ca. 2°
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 1990-07 to 1991-02, 1991-8
Reference S.L. Snowden, et al., Ap,J, Vol.485 (1997), pp.125

ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Background Survey: Band 6

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RASSBck6,rassback6,RASS Background 6

Description
These maps present maps of ROSAT soft X-ray all-sky survey as presented in Snowden et al, ApJ 485, 125 (1997). The maps cover approximately 98% of the sky. These maps have had all point sources removed These surveys supercede the RASS0.25, RASS0.75 and RASS1.5 Kev surveys previously provided. Those surveys may still be invoked in SkyView using batch and jar tools but are not accessible on the Web page.

The seven maps correspond to ranges in the pulse height analysis of the photons detected. Since the energy resolution of the PSPC is poor, there is consider overlap between adjacent bands.

The energy range for the bands corresponds to:
BandEnergy range (keV)
Band 10.11 - 0.284
Band 20.14 - 0.284
Band 30.2 - 0.83
Band 40.44 - 1.01
Band 50.56 - 1.21
Band 60.73 - 1.56
Band 71.05 - 2.04
Note the substantial overlap between bands. Each photon detected is assigned to a band based on the pulse height analysis for that photon, but the energy resolution of the detectors is relatively poor. Also note that Band 3 was not included in the reference paper due to poor statistics and background modeling.

SkyView has several other sets of surveys derived from ROSAT data with substantially higher resolution and which include point sources. The RASS surveys are derived from the RASS all sky survey. These include count and intensity maps. The PSPC maps are dervived from the PSPC pointed observations which were combined by SkyView. The HRI survey is derived from a similar mosaicking of all HRI observations.

Provenance Max Planck Institute for Exterrestrial Physics (Garching FRG)
Copyright MPI but data may be used for scientific purposes so long as appropriate reference is included.
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 6
Frequency 250 PHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.2
PixelUnits 10-6counts/s
Resolution ca. 2°
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 1990-07 to 1991-02, 1991-8
Reference S.L. Snowden, et al., Ap,J, Vol.485 (1997), pp.125

ROSAT All-Sky X-ray Background Survey: Band 7

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RASSBck7,rassback7,RASS Background 7

Description
These maps present maps of ROSAT soft X-ray all-sky survey as presented in Snowden et al, ApJ 485, 125 (1997). The maps cover approximately 98% of the sky. These maps have had all point sources removed These surveys supercede the RASS0.25, RASS0.75 and RASS1.5 Kev surveys previously provided. Those surveys may still be invoked in SkyView using batch and jar tools but are not accessible on the Web page.

The seven maps correspond to ranges in the pulse height analysis of the photons detected. Since the energy resolution of the PSPC is poor, there is consider overlap between adjacent bands.

The energy range for the bands corresponds to:
BandEnergy range (keV)
Band 10.11 - 0.284
Band 20.14 - 0.284
Band 30.2 - 0.83
Band 40.44 - 1.01
Band 50.56 - 1.21
Band 60.73 - 1.56
Band 71.05 - 2.04
Note the substantial overlap between bands. Each photon detected is assigned to a band based on the pulse height analysis for that photon, but the energy resolution of the detectors is relatively poor. Also note that Band 3 was not included in the reference paper due to poor statistics and background modeling.

SkyView has several other sets of surveys derived from ROSAT data with substantially higher resolution and which include point sources. The RASS surveys are derived from the RASS all sky survey. These include count and intensity maps. The PSPC maps are dervived from the PSPC pointed observations which were combined by SkyView. The HRI survey is derived from a similar mosaicking of all HRI observations.

Provenance Max Planck Institute for Exterrestrial Physics (Garching FRG)
Copyright MPI but data may be used for scientific purposes so long as appropriate reference is included.
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 6
Frequency 370 PHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 0.2
PixelUnits 10-6counts/s
Resolution ca. 2°
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Zenithal Equal Area
Epoch 1990-07 to 1991-02, 1991-8
Reference S.L. Snowden, et al., Ap,J, Vol.485 (1997), pp.125

RXTE Allsky 3-8 keV Flux

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RXTE3_8k_flux, RXTE AllSky 3-8keV flux

Description
Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer was launched at the end of 1995 and up to now (2004) it has been successfully operating for more than 7 years. The mission was primarily designed to study the variability of X-ray sources on time scales from sub-milliseconds to years. The maneuvering capability of the satellite combined with the high photon throughput of its main detector (PCA) and high quality of background prediction (thanks to PCA intrumental group of LHEA, GSFC) has also made it possible to construct maps of the sky in energy band 3-20 keV. During its life time RXTE/PCA has collected a large amount of data from slew observations covering almost the entire sky.

We have utilized the slew parts of all RXTE/PCA observations performed from April 15, 1996-July 16, 2002 which amounts in total to approximately 50,000 observations. The exposure time at a given point in the map is typically between 200-500 seconds. The observational period before April 15, 1996 (High Voltage Epochs 1 and 2) was excluded from the analysis because during that time the PCA had significantly different gain and dependence of the effective area on energy. The data reduction was done using standard tools of the LHEASOFT with a set of packages written by M. Revnivtsev (HEAD/IKI, Moscow; MPA, Garching).

The survey has several features. It has strongly different exposure times at different points on the sky that lead to strong variability of the statistical noise on images. Because of that the only meaningful representation of images is the map in units of statistical significance. After the detection of a source flux can be determined from the map in the 'flux' units. Map resolution is determined mainly by the slew rate of the RXTE (<0.05-0.1°/sec) and the time resolution of used data (16 sec, Std2 mode of the PCA). Sources can be detected down to the level of ~6e-12 erg/s/cm2, but at this level the confusion starts to play an important role. Details of the survey are presented in the paper of Revnivtsev et al. (2004).

Provenance High Energy Astrophysics Department, Space Research Institute, Moscow, Russia; M PA, Garching, Germany
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 3
Frequency 1.2 EHz
Bandpass 0.72-1.9 EHz
Coverage All-sky |b| > 3
PixelScale .5x.5° pixel
PixelUnits Flux
Resolution
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1996-2002
Reference RXTE all-sky slew survey. Catalog of X-ray sources at |b|>10 &# 176;, M. Revnivtsev, S. Sazonov, M. Gilfanov, K. Jahoda 2004, A&A, 418, 92 7

RXTE Allsky 3-8 keV Significance

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RXTE3_8k_sig, RXTE AllSky 3-8keV sig ,RXTE AllSky 3-8keV

Description
Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer was launched at the end of 1995 and up to now (2004) it has been successfully operating for more than 7 years. The mission was primarily designed to study the variability of X-ray sources on time scales from sub-milliseconds to years. The maneuvering capability of the satellite combined with the high photon throughput of its main detector (PCA) and high quality of background prediction (thanks to PCA intrumental group of LHEA, GSFC) has also made it possible to construct maps of the sky in energy band 3-20 keV. During its life time RXTE/PCA has collected a large amount of data from slew observations covering almost the entire sky.

We have utilized the slew parts of all RXTE/PCA observations performed from April 15, 1996-July 16, 2002 which amounts in total to approximately 50,000 observations. The exposure time at a given point in the map is typically between 200-500 seconds. The observational period before April 15, 1996 (High Voltage Epochs 1 and 2) was excluded from the analysis because during that time the PCA had significantly different gain and dependence of the effective area on energy. The data reduction was done using standard tools of the LHEASOFT with a set of packages written by M. Revnivtsev (HEAD/IKI, Moscow; MPA, Garching).

The survey has several features. It has strongly different exposure times at different points on the sky that lead to strong variability of the statistical noise on images. Because of that the only meaningful representation of images is the map in units of statistical significance. After the detection of a source flux can be determined from the map in the 'flux' units. Map resolution is determined mainly by the slew rate of the RXTE (<0.05-0.1°/sec) and the time resolution of used data (16 sec, Std2 mode of the PCA). Sources can be detected down to the level of ~6e-12 erg/s/cm2, but at this level the confusion starts to play an important role. Details of the survey are presented in the paper of Revnivtsev et al. (2004).

Provenance High Energy Astrophysics Department, Space Research Institute, Moscow, Russia; M PA, Garching, Germany
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 3
Frequency 1.2 EHz
Bandpass 0.72-1.9 EHz
Coverage All-sky |b| > 3
PixelScale .5x.5° pixel
PixelUnits Significance
Resolution
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1996-2002
Reference RXTE all-sky slew survey. Catalog of X-ray sources at |b|>10 &# 176;, M. Revnivtsev, S. Sazonov, M. Gilfanov, K. Jahoda 2004, A&A, 418, 92 7

RXTE Allsky 8-20 keV Flux

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RXTE8_20k_flux, RXTE AllSky 8-20keV flux

Description
Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer was launched at the end of 1995 and up to now (2004) it has been successfully operating for more than 7 years. The mission was primarily designed to study the variability of X-ray sources on time scales from sub-milliseconds to years. The maneuvering capability of the satellite combined with the high photon throughput of its main detector (PCA) and high quality of background prediction (thanks to PCA intrumental group of LHEA, GSFC) has also made it possible to construct maps of the sky in energy band 3-20 keV. During its life time RXTE/PCA has collected a large amount of data from slew observations covering almost the entire sky.

We have utilized the slew parts of all RXTE/PCA observations performed from April 15, 1996-July 16, 2002 which amounts in total to approximately 50,000 observations. The exposure time at a given point in the map is typically between 200-500 seconds. The observational period before April 15, 1996 (High Voltage Epochs 1 and 2) was excluded from the analysis because during that time the PCA had significantly different gain and dependence of the effective area on energy. The data reduction was done using standard tools of the LHEASOFT with a set of packages written by M. Revnivtsev (HEAD/IKI, Moscow; MPA, Garching).

The survey has several features. It has strongly different exposure times at different points on the sky that lead to strong variability of the statistical noise on images. Because of that the only meaningful representation of images is the map in units of statistical significance. After the detection of a source flux can be determined from the map in the 'flux' units. Map resolution is determined mainly by the slew rate of the RXTE (<0.05-0.1°/sec) and the time resolution of used data (16 sec, Std2 mode of the PCA). Sources can be detected down to the level of ~6e-12 erg/s/cm2, but at this level the confusion starts to play an important role. Details of the survey are presented in the paper of Revnivtsev et al. (2004).

Provenance High Energy Astrophysics Department, Space Research Institute, Moscow, Russia; M PA, Garching, Germany
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 3
Frequency 2.9 EHz
Bandpass 1.9-4.8 EHz
Coverage All-sky |b| > 3
PixelScale .5x.5° pixel
PixelUnits Flux
Resolution
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1996-2002
Reference RXTE all-sky slew survey. Catalog of X-ray sources at |b|>10 &# 176;, M. Revnivtsev, S. Sazonov, M. Gilfanov, K. Jahoda 2004, A&A, 418, 92 7

RXTE Allsky 8-20 keV Significance

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RXTE8_20k_sig, RXTE AllSky 8-20keV sig ,RXTE AllSky 8-20keV

Description
Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer was launched at the end of 1995 and up to now (2004) it has been successfully operating for more than 7 years. The mission was primarily designed to study the variability of X-ray sources on time scales from sub-milliseconds to years. The maneuvering capability of the satellite combined with the high photon throughput of its main detector (PCA) and high quality of background prediction (thanks to PCA intrumental group of LHEA, GSFC) has also made it possible to construct maps of the sky in energy band 3-20 keV. During its life time RXTE/PCA has collected a large amount of data from slew observations covering almost the entire sky.

We have utilized the slew parts of all RXTE/PCA observations performed from April 15, 1996-July 16, 2002 which amounts in total to approximately 50,000 observations. The exposure time at a given point in the map is typically between 200-500 seconds. The observational period before April 15, 1996 (High Voltage Epochs 1 and 2) was excluded from the analysis because during that time the PCA had significantly different gain and dependence of the effective area on energy. The data reduction was done using standard tools of the LHEASOFT with a set of packages written by M. Revnivtsev (HEAD/IKI, Moscow; MPA, Garching).

The survey has several features. It has strongly different exposure times at different points on the sky that lead to strong variability of the statistical noise on images. Because of that the only meaningful representation of images is the map in units of statistical significance. After the detection of a source flux can be determined from the map in the 'flux' units. Map resolution is determined mainly by the slew rate of the RXTE (<0.05-0.1°/sec) and the time resolution of used data (16 sec, Std2 mode of the PCA). Sources can be detected down to the level of ~6e-12 erg/s/cm2, but at this level the confusion starts to play an important role. Details of the survey are presented in the paper of Revnivtsev et al. (2004).

Provenance High Energy Astrophysics Department, Space Research Institute, Moscow, Russia; M PA, Garching, Germany
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 3
Frequency 2.9 EHz
Bandpass 1.9-4.8 EHz
Coverage All-sky |b| > 3
PixelScale .5x.5° pixel
PixelUnits Significance
Resolution
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1996-2002
Reference RXTE all-sky slew survey. Catalog of X-ray sources at |b|>10 &# 176;, M. Revnivtsev, S. Sazonov, M. Gilfanov, K. Jahoda 2004, A&A, 418, 92 7

RXTE Allsky 3-20 keV Flux

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RXTE3_20k_flux, RXTE AllSky 3-20keV flux

Description
Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer was launched at the end of 1995 and up to now (2004) it has been successfully operating for more than 7 years. The mission was primarily designed to study the variability of X-ray sources on time scales from sub-milliseconds to years. The maneuvering capability of the satellite combined with the high photon throughput of its main detector (PCA) and high quality of background prediction (thanks to PCA intrumental group of LHEA, GSFC) has also made it possible to construct maps of the sky in energy band 3-20 keV. During its life time RXTE/PCA has collected a large amount of data from slew observations covering almost the entire sky.

We have utilized the slew parts of all RXTE/PCA observations performed from April 15, 1996-July 16, 2002 which amounts in total to approximately 50,000 observations. The exposure time at a given point in the map is typically between 200-500 seconds. The observational period before April 15, 1996 (High Voltage Epochs 1 and 2) was excluded from the analysis because during that time the PCA had significantly different gain and dependence of the effective area on energy. The data reduction was done using standard tools of the LHEASOFT with a set of packages written by M. Revnivtsev (HEAD/IKI, Moscow; MPA, Garching).

The survey has several features. It has strongly different exposure times at different points on the sky that lead to strong variability of the statistical noise on images. Because of that the only meaningful representation of images is the map in units of statistical significance. After the detection of a source flux can be determined from the map in the 'flux' units. Map resolution is determined mainly by the slew rate of the RXTE (<0.05-0.1°/sec) and the time resolution of used data (16 sec, Std2 mode of the PCA). Sources can be detected down to the level of ~6e-12 erg/s/cm2, but at this level the confusion starts to play an important role. Details of the survey are presented in the paper of Revnivtsev et al. (2004).

Provenance High Energy Astrophysics Department, Space Research Institute, Moscow, Russia; M PA, Garching, Germany
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 3
Frequency 1.9 EHz
Bandpass 0.72-4.8 EHz
Coverage All-sky |b| > 3
PixelScale .5x.5° pixel
PixelUnits Flux
Resolution
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1996-2002
Reference RXTE all-sky slew survey. Catalog of X-ray sources at |b|>10 &# 176;, M. Revnivtsev, S. Sazonov, M. Gilfanov, K. Jahoda 2004, A&A, 418, 92 7

RXTE Allsky 3-20 keV Significance

Short name[s] used to specify survey:RXTE3_20k_sig, RXTE AllSky 3-20keV sig ,RXTE AllSky 3-20keV

Description
Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer was launched at the end of 1995 and up to now (2004) it has been successfully operating for more than 7 years. The mission was primarily designed to study the variability of X-ray sources on time scales from sub-milliseconds to years. The maneuvering capability of the satellite combined with the high photon throughput of its main detector (PCA) and high quality of background prediction (thanks to PCA intrumental group of LHEA, GSFC) has also made it possible to construct maps of the sky in energy band 3-20 keV. During its life time RXTE/PCA has collected a large amount of data from slew observations covering almost the entire sky.

We have utilized the slew parts of all RXTE/PCA observations performed from April 15, 1996-July 16, 2002 which amounts in total to approximately 50,000 observations. The exposure time at a given point in the map is typically between 200-500 seconds. The observational period before April 15, 1996 (High Voltage Epochs 1 and 2) was excluded from the analysis because during that time the PCA had significantly different gain and dependence of the effective area on energy. The data reduction was done using standard tools of the LHEASOFT with a set of packages written by M. Revnivtsev (HEAD/IKI, Moscow; MPA, Garching).

The survey has several features. It has strongly different exposure times at different points on the sky that lead to strong variability of the statistical noise on images. Because of that the only meaningful representation of images is the map in units of statistical significance. After the detection of a source flux can be determined from the map in the 'flux' units. Map resolution is determined mainly by the slew rate of the RXTE (<0.05-0.1°/sec) and the time resolution of used data (16 sec, Std2 mode of the PCA). Sources can be detected down to the level of ~6e-12 erg/s/cm2, but at this level the confusion starts to play an important role. Details of the survey are presented in the paper of Revnivtsev et al. (2004).

Provenance High Energy Astrophysics Department, Space Research Institute, Moscow, Russia; M PA, Garching, Germany
Copyright Public domain
Regime X-ray
NSurvey 3
Frequency 1.9 EHz
Bandpass 0.72-4.8 EHz
Coverage All-sky |b| > 3
PixelScale .5x.5° pixel
PixelUnits Significance
Resolution
Coordinates Galactic
Equinox
Projection Gnomonic
Epoch 1996-2002
Reference RXTE all-sky slew survey. Catalog of X-ray sources at |b|>10 &# 176;, M. Revnivtsev, S. Sazonov, M. Gilfanov, K. Jahoda 2004, A&A, 418, 92 7

Gamma ray surveys

CGRO Compton Telescope: 3 channel data

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Comptel,CGRO Comptel

Description
This survey is a maximum entropy solution to the data taken by the CompTel instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The data in this survey are intended only to give the general appearance of the MeV gamma-ray sky. Fluxes, flux limits and spectra should be derived using the Compass system for the analysis of CompTel data. Compass is available at the Compton Observatory Science Support Center .

The maps were originally generated by the CompTel Instrument Team as three separate maps in the bands:

  • 1-3 MeV
  • 3-10 MeV
  • 10-30 MeV

All CompTel observations from phases 1, 2 and 3 were included in the maps (May 1991 through October 1994). These maps were combined into a single 3-D map at SkyView

Provenance CompTel Instrument Team. Maps generated by Andrew Strong, Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (Garching).
Copyright Public domain
Regime Gamma Ray
NSurvey 1 survey with 3 bands
Frequency 2.4 ZHz
Bandpass 0.24-7.2 ZHz
Coverage All-sky
PixelScale 1d
PixelUnits cts/s/cm2/steradian
Resolution ~3d
Epoch May 1991 to October 1994
CoordinateSystem Galactic
Projection Rectangular (CAR)
Reference Comptel Instrument Team Home Page

Energetic Gamma-Ray Event Telescope: Hard

Short name[s] used to specify survey:EGRETHard, EGRET1000, EGRET >100 MeV

Description
These data are from the Compton GRO EGRET team. Data are from all pointings of the EGRET instrument in the verification phase and phase 1-4 of the Compton mission. The maps exist in energies 30-100 MeV, 100-100000 MeV, and as a multi-dimensional, 10 channel survey. For the multi-dimensional survey, channels 1-3 comprise energies less than 100 MeV, and channels 4-10 comprise energies greater than 100 MeV. Note that the energies are not uniformly split among the channels.

The EGRET 3D map is comprised of ten channels with the following energy ranges:

  • Channel 1 30-50 MeV
  • Channel 2 50-70 MeV
  • Channel 3 70-100 MeV
  • Channel 4 100-150 MeV
  • Channel 5 150-300 MeV
  • Channel 6 300-500 MeV
  • Channel 7 500-1000 MeV
  • Channel 8 1000-2000 MeV
  • Channel 9 2000-4000 MeV
  • Channel 10 4000-10000 MeV

The default two dimensional image for the EGRET 3D survey is an average of Channels 4 - 10 (energies greater than 100 MeV).

Provenance EGRET Instrument team, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Copyright Public domain
Regime Gamma Ray
NSurveys 3
Frequency 72 ZHz
Bandpass 24-2400 ZHz
Coverage All-sky
Resolution ca. 5d below 100 MeV, ca. 2d above 100 MeV
PixelScale 0.5 degrees/pixel
PixelUnits cts/s/cm2/steradian
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Rectangular
Epoch 1992-1995
Reference Hartman, et al., 1999, The Third EGRET Source Catalog, ApJ Supplement, 123, 79-202

Energetic Gamma-Ray Event Telescope: Soft

Short name[s] used to specify survey:EGRETSoft, EGRET30, EGRET <100 MeV

Description
These data are from the Compton GRO EGRET team. Data are from all pointings of the EGRET instrument in the verification phase and phase 1-4 of the Compton mission. The maps exist in energies 30-100 MeV, 100-100000 MeV, and as a multi-dimensional, 10 channel survey. For the multi-dimensional survey, channels 1-3 comprise energies less than 100 MeV, and channels 4-10 comprise energies greater than 100 MeV. Note that the energies are not uniformly split among the channels.

The EGRET 3D map is comprised of ten channels with the following energy ranges:

  • Channel 1 30-50 MeV
  • Channel 2 50-70 MeV
  • Channel 3 70-100 MeV
  • Channel 4 100-150 MeV
  • Channel 5 150-300 MeV
  • Channel 6 300-500 MeV
  • Channel 7 500-1000 MeV
  • Channel 8 1000-2000 MeV
  • Channel 9 2000-4000 MeV
  • Channel 10 4000-10000 MeV

The default two dimensional image for the EGRET 3D survey is an average of Channels 4 - 10 (energies greater than 100 MeV).

Provenance EGRET Instrument team, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Copyright Public domain
Regime Gamma Ray
NSurveys 3
Frequency 15 ZHz
Bandpass 7.2-24 ZHz
Coverage All-sky
Resolution ca. 5d below 100 MeV, ca. 2d above 100 MeV
PixelScale 0.5 degrees/pixel
PixelUnits cts/s/cm2/steradian
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Rectangular
Epoch 1992-1995
Reference Hartman, et al., 1999, The Third EGRET Source Catalog, ApJ Supplement, 123, 79-202

Energetic Gamma-Ray Event Telescope: 10 channel data

Short name[s] used to specify survey:EGRET3D,EGRET(3D), EGRET (3D)

Description
These data are from the Compton GRO EGRET team. Data are from all pointings of the EGRET instrument in the verification phase and phase 1-4 of the Compton mission. The maps exist in energies 30-100 MeV, 100-10000 MeV, and as a multi-dimensional, 10 channel survey. For the multi-dimensional survey, channels 1-3 comprise energies less than 100 MeV, and channels 4-10 comprise energies greater than 100 MeV. Note that the energies are not uniformly split among the channels.

The EGRET 3D map is comprised of ten channels with the following energy ranges:

  • Channel 1 30-50 MeV
  • Channel 2 50-70 MeV
  • Channel 3 70-100 MeV
  • Channel 4 100-150 MeV
  • Channel 5 150-300 MeV
  • Channel 6 300-500 MeV
  • Channel 7 500-1000 MeV
  • Channel 8 1000-2000 MeV
  • Channel 9 2000-4000 MeV
  • Channel 10 4000-10000 MeV

The default two dimensional image for the EGRET 3D survey is an average of Channels 4 - 10 (energies greater than 100 MeV).

Provenance EGRET Instrument team, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Copyright Public domain
Regime Gamma Ray
NSurveys 3
Frequency 24 ZHz
Bandpass .24-2400 ZHz
Coverage All-sky
Resolution ca. 5d below 100 MeV, ca. 2d above 100 MeV
PixelScale 0.5 degrees/pixel
PixelUnits cts/s/cm2/steradian
Coordinates Galactic
Projection Rectangular
Epoch 1992-1995
Reference Hartman, et al., 1999, The Third EGRET Source Catalog, ApJ Supplement, 123, 79-202

Fermi Map: Band 1

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Fermi 1, Fermi1, Fermi band 1

Description
This survey sums all data observed by the Fermi mission up to week 396. This version of the Fermi survey are intensity maps where the summed counts maps are divided by the exposure for each pixel. We anticipate using the HEASARC's Hera capabilities to update this survey on a roughly quarterly basis. Data is broken into 5 energy bands
  • 30-100 MeV Band 1
  • 100-300 MeV Band 2
  • 300-1000 MeV Band 3
  • 1-3 GeV Band 4
  • 3-300 GeV Band 5
The SkyView data are based upon a Cartesian projection of the counts divided by the exposure maps. In the Cartesian projection pixels near the pole have a much smaller area than pixels on the equator, so these pixels have smaller integrated flux. When creating large scale images in other projections users may wish to make sure to compensate for this effect the flux conserving clip-resampling option.

Provenance Fermi LAT instrument team, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Copyright Public domain
Regime Gamma Ray
NSurveys 5
Frequency 12 ZHz
Bandwidth 7-24 ZHz (30-100 MeV)
Coverage All-sky
Resolution 3 degrees.
PixelScale 0.1 degrees/pixel
PixelUnits cnts/s/cm^2
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Rectangular
Epoch 2008-2012
Reference Data and survey paper (ADS)

Fermi Map: Band 2

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Fermi 2, Fermi2, Fermi band 2

Description
This survey sums all data observed by the Fermi mission up to week 396. This version of the Fermi survey are intensity maps where the summed counts maps are divided by the exposure for each pixel. We anticipate using the HEASARC's Hera capabilities to update this survey on a roughly quarterly basis. Data is broken into 5 energy bands
  • 30-100 MeV Band 1
  • 100-300 MeV Band 2
  • 300-1000 MeV Band 3
  • 1-3 GeV Band 4
  • 3-300 GeV Band 5
The SkyView data are based upon a Cartesian projection of the counts divided by the exposure maps. In the Cartesian projection pixels near the pole have a much smaller area than pixels on the equator, so these pixels have smaller integrated flux. When creating large scale images in other projections users may wish to make sure to compensate for this effect the flux conserving clip-resampling option.

Provenance Fermi LAT instrument team, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Copyright Public domain
Regime Gamma Ray
NSurveys 5
Frequency 40 ZHz
Bandwidth 24-70 ZHz (100-300 MeV)
Coverage All-sky
Resolution 2 degrees.
PixelScale 0.1 degrees/pixel
PixelUnits cnts/s/cm^2
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Rectangular
Epoch 2008-2012
Reference Data and survey paper (ADS)

Fermi Map: Band 3

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Fermi 3, Fermi3, Fermi band 3

Description
This survey sums all data observed by the Fermi mission up to week 396. This version of the Fermi survey are intensity maps where the summed counts maps are divided by the exposure for each pixel. We anticipate using the HEASARC's Hera capabilities to update this survey on a roughly quarterly basis. Data is broken into 5 energy bands
  • 30-100 MeV Band 1
  • 100-300 MeV Band 2
  • 300-1000 MeV Band 3
  • 1-3 GeV Band 4
  • 3-300 GeV Band 5
The SkyView data are based upon a Cartesian projection of the counts divided by the exposure maps. In the Cartesian projection pixels near the pole have a much smaller area than pixels on the equator, so these pixels have smaller integrated flux. When creating large scale images in other projections users may wish to make sure to compensate for this effect the flux conserving clip-resampling option.

Provenance Fermi LAT instrument team, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Copyright Public domain
Regime Gamma Ray
NSurveys 5
Frequency 150 ZHz
Bandwidth 70-240 ZHz (300-1000 MeV)
Coverage All-sky
Resolution 1 degrees.
PixelScale 0.1 degrees/pixel
PixelUnits cnts/s/cm^2
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Rectangular
Epoch 2008-2012
Reference Data and survey paper (ADS)

Fermi Map: Band 4

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Fermi 4, Fermi4, Fermi band 4

Description
This survey sums all data observed by the Fermi mission up to week 396. This version of the Fermi survey are intensity maps where the summed counts maps are divided by the exposure for each pixel. We anticipate using the HEASARC's Hera capabilities to update this survey on a roughly quarterly basis. Data is broken into 5 energy bands
  • 30-100 MeV Band 1
  • 100-300 MeV Band 2
  • 300-1000 MeV Band 3
  • 1-3 GeV Band 4
  • 3-300 GeV Band 5
The SkyView data are based upon a Cartesian projection of the counts divided by the exposure maps. In the Cartesian projection pixels near the pole have a much smaller area than pixels on the equator, so these pixels have smaller integrated flux. When creating large scale images in other projections users may wish to make sure to compensate for this effect the flux conserving clip-resampling option.

Provenance Fermi LAT instrument team, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Copyright Public domain
Regime Gamma Ray
NSurveys 5
Frequency 400 ZHz
Bandwidth 240-700 ZHz (1-3 GeV)
Coverage All-sky
Resolution 0.4 degrees.
PixelScale 0.1 degrees/pixel
PixelUnits cnts/s/cm^2
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Rectangular
Epoch 2008-2012
Reference Data and survey paper (ADS)

Fermi Map: Band 5

Short name[s] used to specify survey:Fermi 5, Fermi5, Fermi band 5

Description
This survey sums all data observed by the Fermi mission up to week 396. This version of the Fermi survey are intensity maps where the summed counts maps are divided by the exposure for each pixel. We anticipate using the HEASARC's Hera capabilities to update this survey on a roughly quarterly basis. Data is broken into 5 energy bands
  • 30-100 MeV Band 1
  • 100-300 MeV Band 2
  • 300-1000 MeV Band 3
  • 1-3 GeV Band 4
  • 3-300 GeV Band 5
The SkyView data are based upon a Cartesian projection of the counts divided by the exposure maps. In the Cartesian projection pixels near the pole have a much smaller area than pixels on the equator, so these pixels have smaller integrated flux. When creating large scale images in other projections users may wish to make sure to compensate for this effect the flux conserving clip-resampling option.

Provenance Fermi LAT instrument team, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Copyright Public domain
Regime Gamma Ray
NSurveys 5
Frequency 1400 ZHz
Bandwidth 700-70000 ZHz (3-300 GeV)
Coverage All-sky
Resolution 0.2 degrees.
PixelScale 0.1 degrees/pixel
PixelUnits cnts/s/cm^2
Coordinates Equatorial
Equinox 2000
Projection Rectangular
Epoch 2008-2012
Reference Data and survey paper (ADS)